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Index of Roman Mints

The following is a list of the known mints in the Roman Empire. Included are the ancient locations, modern equivelants, and dates of operation where known.

Mints of Rome

  • Alexandria, (Egypt) 294 A.D until closed by Leo I in the mid 5th century.
  • Ambianum, (Amiens, France) 350-353 AD
  • Antioch/Antiochia, (Antakiyah, Syria) closed by Leo I
  • Aquileia, (Italy) 294-425 AD
  • Arelatum/Constantina, (Arles, France) 313-475 AD.
  • Barcino, (Barcelona, Spain) 409-411 AD under Constantine III.
  • Caesara, (Banias, Israel) Augustus to Civil Wars of 69.
  • Camulodunum, (Colchester, England) 287-296 A.D.
  • Carthage/Carthago, (near Tunis, North Africa) 296-307 and 308-311 AD.
  • Clausentum, (Bitterne, England).
  • Constantinopolis or Byzantium, (Istanbul, Turkey) 326 AD through the Byzantine Empire.
  • Cyzicus, (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) closed by Leo I.
  • Emesa, (Syria) Macrianus 260-261 C.E.
  • Heraclea, (Eregli, Turkey) 291 AD until closed by Leo I.
  • Londinium, (London, England) 287 - 325 and 383 - 388 AD.
  • Lugdunum, (Lyons, France) closed 423 AD.
  • Mediolanum, (Milan, Italy) 364 - 475 AD.
  • Nicomedia, (Izmit,Turkey) 294 AD until closed by Leo I.
  • Ostia, (Port of Rome) 308 - 313 AD.
  • Ravenna, (Italy) 5th Century until 475 AD.
  • Rome, (Italy) closed 476 AD.
  • Serdica, (Sophia, Bulgaria) 303 - 308 and 313 - 314 AD.
  • Sirmium, (near Sremska Mitrovica) 320 - 326 and 351 - 364, 379 and 393 - 395 AD.
  • Siscia, (Sisak, Croatia) closed 387 AD.
  • Thessalonica, (Salonika, Greece) 298 AD until closed by Leo I.
  • Ticinum, (Pavia, Italy) closed 326 AD.
  • Treveri, (Trier, Germany) 291 - 430 AD.
  • Viminacium, (Kostolac, Yugoslavia) under Valerian 253 - 260 AD.
  • Did you know?

    Roman generals like Caesar and Marc Anthony minted their own coins while campaigning so they could pay their men and buy supplies. The reverse side of these coins often have the name and symbols of the legion that the coins were being paid to.



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    Roman Mints Index - Related Topic: Roman Roads


    Bibliography



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