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caldrail

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Blog Comments posted by caldrail


  1. No, because historians have identified nine seperate Arturs in the Dark Ages from all over England and Wales. The problem is that the various events and achievements of them have all sort of blurred into one aided by some very hazy and inaccurate reporting, not to mention the extraordinary retelling of british history by Geoffery of Monmouth in the 12th century.

     

    Actually your grannie was way off target. An englishman can always be found in the midday sun.


  2. There seems to be point in rulership after which everyone just accepts you're a nutter and sort of grows attached to the old bugger no matter how daft he is. The problems arise if the dictator isn't benign. Eventually it causes hatred.

     

    As for Italy, I simply do not understand their politics. Who does? I hear that one town mayor has declared independence and printed his currency which he one day hopes will be used alongside the Euro. He might just get his chance the way things are going.


  3. American cider? That's unheard of in Blighty. We've recently had tv ads for Cidre (note the spelling) which is Stella Artoia's version for cool trendy people who can't spell or bear the thought of drinking the same stuff as a down and out. Doomed to failure. Firstly it's cider by any other name, secondly it's french, which means every blue blooded englishman is autiomatically suspicious and thirdly, it'll cost too much. The beggars won't be able to afford it.


  4. Cider is something of a two faced coin here in Britain. There was a brief period in the late eighties when brewers tried to make it trendy (and thus charge four times the amount for my favourite tipple) but whilst 'fine cider' is sold alongside wines from around the world, cheap cider is usually considered the socially accepted drink of the park bench resident.

     

    Pot noodles aren't very nice anywhere :D


  5. Actually I meant he would be crashing through my front door in a pickup truck stolen for the purpose, in a blind obsession driven by his inhuman programming to seek out his objective, and he will never, ever, stop. Or have I been watching too much Hollywood? Certainly haven't been emptying your wineries of late. Far too expensive ;)


  6. Expensive certainly. Wars always are. The question of effectiveness is more difficult because security operations like this do not easily result in identifiable gains. Also the British don't seem to be too sharp on propaganda whereas the Taliban trumpet every single act they perform.

     

    When was the last time we heard anything positive? Most of the time we get a scrolling message at the bottom of the tv screen during newscasts telling us another solder has been killed in Helmand. I can only think of one report ever, the successful installation of a dam under army escort, that rated any mention. other than that we're left with occaisional documentaries also aimed at developing a sense of sympathy with our lads over there.

     

    I don't doubt for a moment that the work they do is dangerous or that it involves considerable hardship. What we lack, as civilian observers of the news, is any sense that anything is being achieved. That's the trouble with security operations - they don't necessarily generate identifiable results, although in this case the presence of NATO troops provides a focus for Taliban effort in their own back yard rather than ours, but as it happens I think preventing the spread of radical islamic power from that region does appear to be a worthwhile exercise.


  7. What? That London march? There's always a percentage of the population that don't like wars and think the world would be a better place if we all stayed at home. Personally I think war is a terrible thing. Unfortunately, that's how human beings do business and settle arguments.


  8. Yeah? And I thought it was just a means of manipulating emotional responses from the public to accept casualties in a foreign war that does not visibly result in territorial gains, or any apparent objective at all. It is therefore a means of offsetting a public reaction against what could become an unpopular and ineffective and expensive campaign.


  9. How curious.... When I was young, exams were meant to test the individual and I don't remember anyone collapsing under the strain (though a fair few of us suffered bad results - I got U in World Affairs - Ungraded)

     

    Back then of course we were put through tests every other week. The results were often read out, those who did well applauded, those who did badly humiliated mildly, and no-one worried about psychological damage of which I suspect there was very little. It seems to me that the political correctness in modern western classrooms doesn't prepare children for stress or stong demands either as young students or in later life.


  10. Oh we get most of your weather second hand. There's another ex-hurricane on it's way, so I'm told. Don't know about California though. Mostly we're stuck with the stuff from the Carribean and Atlantic. Occaisional bouts of Siberia or Mediterranean push our way sometimes. As for Blighty, it's going back to normally windy.

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