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L. Quintus Sertorius

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Everything posted by L. Quintus Sertorius

  1. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Lucius Quintus Sertorius

    The same authority that Sulla wielded to reform the Roman state - the force of arms. The years following Sulla's victory were nearly anarchic outside the boundaries of the Roman pomerium. There were small Marian forces active in Italy, Greece, Asia, and obviously Spain for some time after Rome itself fell. The rift between Metellus and Pompey really only had a large effect in the early stage of the joint campaign. After the debacle at Sucro, the two commanders worked much more closely together (in effect, Pompey was given de facto command of both forces) and managed slightly better. However, I do think that Sertorius' skill as a general played a large part in his successes. Place any other general of the time period in Sertorius' shoes, and I doubt they would have been half as successful.
  2. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Lucius Quintus Sertorius

    Sulla's proscriptions and massacres after his final victory in Italy did much to ensure that there were few, if any, supporters of Marius willing to actively oppose him. Also, I'm not certain what the papers burned by Pompey contained - they may have been letters from former Marians begging Sertorius to reconcile, military directives, etc.; but I doubt highly that they were actual lists of populares in Italy. As mentioned before, there were few people actively espousing the popular tradition after Sulla's victory - no one would even do so much as publically commemorate Marius until the time of Caesar's aedileship.
  3. L. Quintus Sertorius

    A Question About A Famous Roman Quote

    I'm not sure about that one, but I remember a Polybios quote that reads something like this: "The welfare of the Roman state is based on ancient traditions, and the men who uphold them."
  4. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Lucius Quintus Sertorius

    His inattention to the skill of his subordinates. He spent little, if any, time educating his Iberian and Roman officers about the conduction of military matters - and as a result was forced to be in command at all important conflicts. His campaign would have been much more successful had he been in command of a skillful officer corps, as his style of guerilla warfare would have been less haphazard and more in tune with the actual goals of his campaign.
  5. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Could Quintus Sertorius Have Made It?

    It's mainly Plutarch, but I added some bits to his account of Arausio and several other battles that I have from my books. If I can find the time today, I'll cite them in the thread.
  6. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Could Quintus Sertorius Have Made It?

    Sertorius had a good chance of defeating Pompey and Metellus militarily, had he survived. The more important question is whether or not the Iberians would have continued his reforms and continued to singly resist Roman aggression. The answer to this, sadly, is probably not. Also, I'm working on an annotation of Plutarch's Sertorius that I hope to post on here within the next week or so.
  7. L. Quintus Sertorius

    The Lex Gabinia

    You're quite correct. Pompey's command was given to him by an extraordinary law that specifically extended his proconsular imperium to include, as I recall, unlimited authority over all of the Mediterranean Sea, and also over all land within fifty miles of the shoreline. Caesar's command was, ostensibly, a standard proconsular commission. However, the strength of his block of supporters in Rome enabled him to breach the legal standards restricting the abuse of proconsular power without facing any substantial opposition from anyone - save Cato, that is. Pompey's breach of the restrictions on his imperium were slight and, in any case, there were few restrictions to begin with. Caesar's were much more perfidious for knowingly breaking the laws governing his power, and counting on the docility of his enemies to allow him to get away with it. It is obvious that Caesar was counting on his enemies to let him get away with what he had perpetrated during his consulate of 60 B.C.E., and subsequently in his ten years in Gaul. It was their determination to uphold the rule of law that caused Caesar to launch the Bellum Civilis. Even if comparisons to the current straits of American politics are for the most part baseless, I still dislike the idea of such a precedent. EDIT - I think that when the article refers to a "special extended command" of Caesar's, he refers to the fact that no man would normally be alotted two successive proconsulates, except perhaps in times of dire need (Scipio in Spain and successively, Africa.).
  8. L. Quintus Sertorius

    When Does Antiquity End?

    The study of Roman law and writings never really halted in Lombardia. In Society and Politics in Medieval Italy: The Evolution of the Civil Life, 1000-1350, J.K. Hyde devotes the better part of a chapter to an analysis of the status of Italian cities under the Lombardic and Frankish kingdoms (the latter being better known as the Holy Roman Empire, though there was not technically such a body at the time of the Frankish conquest). Under the Gothic kings, Italian cities were encouraged to continue the bureacratic traditions of the Romans. Civic legal codes became slightly differentiated, mainly because of the lack of a codified, readily available source of written law. The introduction of Justinian's Corpus Iuris Civilis led to a new interest in the study of Roman law. Indeed, by the time of the Lombard conquests in the late 6th century, Italian lawyers and bureacrats were operating under much the same conditions and with similar procedures as their counterparts of 100 or even 200 years before. After the Lombards conquered Northern Italy, they made few attempts to learn the art of government needed to organize such a large kingdom as the one they now controlled. As such, they turned to the native Italians for legal and bureacratic advice. However, Lombard laws were slowly forced upon the cities, and the study of Justinian's Code became the enclave of specially designated advocates, or giudices. The Lombard system was even then sophisticated enough to stun the invading Franks, to whom the Lombards had been described as godless, uncultured barbarians. Roman culture survived the fall of Rome, for the most part intact, in Italy. Indeed, the great Lombard League that threw down Barbarossa swore common ground with the Pope and the S.P.Q.R. (though really now only composed of aristocratic Roman families). Even classical allusions were quite commonplace, as Hyde referenced:
  9. L. Quintus Sertorius

    UNRV American Meet 2007

    I don't live in Pennsylvania - Louisiana pride! But I also have school next year, so it will have to be sometime in the summer. Preferably not too far west, I don't want to go bankrupt for two or three days in Vegas.
  10. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Why Did The Roman Republic Fall?

    And so you postulate that, even if Sulla and Pompey had met no resistance in Italy, they still would have proscripted so many? I doubt that highly, and you're applying a varnish to Caesar's political tool of clemency that was not there at all times. Caesar's hard-won war in Spain led him to execute 5,000 captured Roman soldiers after the battle of Munda, and kill Gnaeus Pompey and Labienus. Would Caesar have been so forgiving after a long, slogging campaign down the Italian peninsula, as surely would have occurred had Pompey mustered the forces he intended to in time? Again, highly doubtful. It's also probable that, given such a firm resistance in Italy proper, Caesar would have dropped all pretenses and lashed out against his political opponents - just as Sulla did. The extent of those who stayed behind is greatly exaggerated. Almost all of the Senate and the Ordo Equester left with Pompey - there were so few Senators left that Caesar could barely muster a rump to hear his justifications when he reached Rome. And Pompey's nickname during the 1st Civil War was adulescens carnifex - teenage butcher. A nickname earned for stupendously outrageous acts during Sulla's reign. So, we have a "teenage butcher" with the backing of the legitimate government of the People of the Imperium Romanorum, and a middle-aged butcher who, having drenched his sword with blood in Gaul, decided that he'd rather drench it in Italian blood than lay it down. Of course they didn't want a civil war - but when it came down to it, they had no choice. Caesar alone had the power to disband his legions, lay down his imperium, and answer for his crimes. It was his refusal to do so that prompted the Civil War, not any speech of Cato or Cicero's. If by "poor and stubborn politicians", you mean "the legitimate and near entire governing body of the Roman Republic", then you might be somewhere near correct. And if there was a greater general among the Senate to defend the legitimate cause of the Republic than Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, feel free to point him out. I'm having trouble seeing anyone else who had the slightest chance of victory. Whose fault the whole mess was in the first place.
  11. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Translation Quicky

    I wasn't familiar with that use (mainly because I plucked mine out of my New College Latin and English Dictionary), but yours is certainly easier to pronounce.
  12. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Translation Quicky

    The verb is percutio, percutere, percutissi, percutissus The noun for smiter would be percutissor.
  13. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Why Did The Roman Republic Fall?

    If you refer to the fight against Sullan dictatorship by Sertorius as a mere revolt, then I fear you have gravely misunderstood the motivations and reasons behind his actions.
  14. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Caesar's Crimes

    I'm not sure exactly what source details Bibulus baring his neck to Caesar, but I've read it in several works on the period (Meier and Holland among them), and so will continue to search for it.
  15. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Caesar's Crimes

    I pulled 5 million off the top of my head, should have verified it before posting. My apologies, I'll amend it.
  16. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Saying Of The Day

    An old favorite: "I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand, Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose frown And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamp'd on these lifeless things, The hand that mock'd them and the heart that fed. And on the pedestal these words appear: "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!" Nothing beside remains: round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, The lone and level sands stretch far away." - Shelley. And also: "The King with half the East at heel is marched from lands of morning, His fighters drink the rivers up, their shafts benight the air; And him that stands will die for naught, and home there's no returning. The Spartans on the sea-wet rock sat down and combed their hair." - A.E. Housman And for a funny one, the last words of Vespasian - "Dear me! I think I'm becoming a god!"
  17. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Your Hidden Roman Name

    This looks like fun! I am compelled to indulge. Apologies for the long scrambles, my family is Irish-Catholic. danenrb apktrci ealrclr
  18. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Caesar's Crimes

    Though the defense may rest, the prosecution sees no reason to halt its presentation of the case. Trying to end Caesar's career by prosecuting him for the breach of a negligible law is like trying to kill an elephant with a pellet gun. Besides, Caesar had many, more devastating charges to answer for - the breach of proconsular imperium, the wanton murder of approximately 5 million innocent Gauls [edit - a more accurate number would be 1 million], the unlawful imprisonment of diplomatic envoys, the destruction of a Roman ally, and threatening the life of a consular colleague. Trying to support the position that the Late Republic was more corrupt than that of earlier generations is an impossible proposition. These breaches of electoral law had gone on since the days of Gaius Gracchus, Marius and M. Aemilius Scaurus, Cinna and Sulla; and it went on now in the days of Caesar, Cato, Cicero, and Pompey. Their violence was escalating, true, but the death of Clodius and the exile of Milo did much to calm the city in the years preceding Caesar's coup. In any case, the violence of the period is much exaggerated, mainly because the only primary source we have are Cicero's hyperbolic letters to Atticus - whereas we have little if any records from the participants in politics of earlier periods. I have no doubt that the letters of M. Aemilius Scaurus or M. Porcius Cato Maior would read much the same, save perhaps the difference in the purity of their Latin prose. I can think of a superb solution - Caesar comes back to Rome without a sword in his hand and answers for his crimes. That would have suited Rome perfectly. My comment was in answer to your supposition that any small fry could bring down Caesar in the courts, as referenced here: Too bad you failed to mention that Sallust was a staunch Caesarian, and actually accompanied Caesar in his African campaign to fight against fellow Romans. In fact, Sallust was guilty of such gross oppression and extortion as governor of Africa that only Caesar's influence saved him from prosecution and exile. He may have been there to see it all, but he certainly didn't see it clearly.
  19. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Caesar's Crimes

    And I'm also quite certain that you realize that the penalties for such crimes were negligible, if they were even implemented at all. Usually, such prosecutions followed closely on the heels of various sumptuary laws (e.g., those of Cato the Elder), and were in no way, shape, or form career-ruining convictions.
  20. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Brutus

    What are forums for if not discussion of differing opinions? One more lap around the cursus, good sir.
  21. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Brutus

    Then refute it with your own argument.
  22. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Brutus

    Brutus followed Pompey because the Senate and the cause of legitimate Roman government chose Pompey as their champion. A M. Junius Brutus, descendant of the man who slew his own sons for conspiring against the consuls, could never take the standard of an outlaw opposed to the Roman state - even if that outlaw had the best chance of revenging one's own personal grievances. The Republic came before vendetta in any case. For Brutus, much as for Cicero, "Caesar's cause lacked nothing but a cause.". And it was that lack that determined Brutus' position.
  23. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Marc Antony Quotes...

    I was actually searching the house for my copy of Tom Holland's Rubicon, as he quotes Antony and provides a footnote and reference. But alas, I found it not.
  24. L. Quintus Sertorius

    Marc Antony Quotes...

    I searched in vain for the source of that quote, so that I could have the joy of posting it - "Who cares if I'm screwing the Queen? What does it matter where you shove your erection?". But you beat me to it. I think that's one that really shows the character of Antony the man.
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