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omoplata

Where did Caesar Learn How to Fight?

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Agreed...for once..Could this be the start of something special?

 

Hopefully not a special commission to Cyprus, Clodius. Glad you liked Gruen's book -- it's not as anti-Caesar as I would have written it, but it's pro-republic, which is more important.

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Agreed...for once..Could this be the start of something special?

 

Hopefully not a special commission to Cyprus, Clodius. Glad you liked Gruen's book -- it's not as anti-Caesar as I would have written it, but it's pro-republic, which is more important.

I wouldn't say it was pro-republican as you put it, but instead offers an original thesis in that rather than a 'revolutionary' period, it was (almost) business as usual for the romans. As for it being anti-Caesarian or not I was pleasantly surprised to find it wasn't really anti anything, other than anti 'established' theories. Indeed, one could find plenty of material for a pro or anti whatever side you chose to support. It is without doubt a future reference book. What're your thoughts on his ideas about Curio?

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What're your thoughts on his ideas about Curio?

 

As I recall, he was rather more charitable than I would have been. Thanks for reminding me to look up his treatment.

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What're your thoughts on his ideas about Curio?

 

As I recall, he was rather more charitable than I would have been. Thanks for reminding me to look up his treatment.

In summary, he attributes the rift btwn Caesar and Pompey to Curio. The rift being in neither parties best interests, particularly Caesar's, Curio did this to enhance his own standing.

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As far as I know the only source we have for the overwhelming odds he repeatedly overcame in Gaul is, errr Caesar.
I know his own "diary" was a major source of our knowledge about the campaign against the Gauls. but is Caesar's writings the only source of our knowledge of the war really?

 

Caesar's commentaries on his Gallic adventure were not for his own private use (as in a diary), but for political propaganda. It's useful to note in this context that Caesar refers to himself in the third person ("Caesar", "he") and not in the first person ("I"). Unless Caesar were quite mad, it's unlikely he'd use the third person for himself in his own diaries. (Though this is someone who claimed to be a descendent of Venus...)

 

We do have other sources for the war, but I don't think they're really dispositive of the numbers Caesar faced. Our other sources are archaeological -- so, we can go to Gergovia (say) and excavate for Roman war machinery, but it won't tell us how many Gallic women and children were clapped in chains and sent to Rome. For that kind of information, we rely on Caesar (who claims to have enslaved a million men, women and children).

You said the commentaires was for propaganda purpose, and so think I, but the talk abput descent from venus is too of course, i dont think he really thought he was a desent from a god, but it strengthen his stand with the people.

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