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Roman Demonology/Angelology

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Taken from the Illustrated Bible, I guess. Pretty diverse species, I must say, although the bearded guy doesn't look particularly monstrous.

Could be just some guy named Matthew visiting a zoo.

 

Too bad, as this thread was (unexpectedly) getting interesting.

Ursus, I take it we don't have a clear idea of what Lemures were supposed to look like?

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Real angels? Real angels? Do sense a mythbuster post in the offing? If you believe such entities exist, fine, but that's a matter of faith, not fact, and therefore to call them 'real' in any material sense is both incorrect and ridiculous.

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You can't help looking at pictorial representations of the Godess Victory/Victoria, and thinking she's an angel. Did the one evolve from the other?

Very plausible that modern Angels having wings was influenced by Roman mythology and it doesn't surprise me if Victoria was the basis or among the more influential Roman mythological figures influenced the modern view of Angels.

 

Real Angels look nothing warm and gentle like they're portrayed in recent literature and popular media.In fact the bible describes them as looking like TERRIFYING MONSTERS.

Here are what real angels look like.

 

33631.jpg?v=1

cherub-15080.jpg

seraph-15079.jpg

 

firstly, angles come from the persian gods. Secondly romans, etruscans and greeks did have demon, but not angles. Demons or rather daemons, as the greeks called them were the semi-divine, demi-gods/spirits not gods. they would therefore include all monsters, and creatures such as furies muses and nymphs and satires. This was my thesis by the way, so it is a well researeched ideas. I can recommend some bokks on the subject if you like.

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I can recommend some bokks on the subject if you like.

 

Welcome, Joe . . . and yes, go for it!

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Guest ParatrooperLirelou

You can't help looking at pictorial representations of the Godess Victory/Victoria, and thinking she's an angel. Did the one evolve from the other?

Very plausible that modern Angels having wings was influenced by Roman mythology and it doesn't surprise me if Victoria was the basis or among the more influential Roman mythological figures influenced the modern view of Angels.

 

Real Angels look nothing warm and gentle like they're portrayed in recent literature and popular media.In fact the bible describes them as looking like TERRIFYING MONSTERS.

Here are what real angels look like.

 

33631.jpg?v=1

cherub-15080.jpg

seraph-15079.jpg

 

firstly, angles come from the persian gods. Secondly romans, etruscans and greeks did have demon, but not angles. Demons or rather daemons, as the greeks called them were the semi-divine, demi-gods/spirits not gods. they would therefore include all monsters, and creatures such as furies muses and nymphs and satires. This was my thesis by the way, so it is a well researeched ideas. I can recommend some bokks on the subject if you like.

Please do!Much of what I read so far were exclusively on the internet and the Bible.

 

Please give me some books on the subject!

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You can't help looking at pictorial representations of the Godess Victory/Victoria, and thinking she's an angel. Did the one evolve from the other?

Very plausible that modern Angels having wings was influenced by Roman mythology and it doesn't surprise me if Victoria was the basis or among the more influential Roman mythological figures influenced the modern view of Angels.

 

Real Angels look nothing warm and gentle like they're portrayed in recent literature and popular media.In fact the bible describes them as looking like TERRIFYING MONSTERS.

Here are what real angels look like.

 

33631.jpg?v=1

cherub-15080.jpg

seraph-15079.jpg

 

firstly, angles come from the persian gods. Secondly romans, etruscans and greeks did have demon, but not angles. Demons or rather daemons, as the greeks called them were the semi-divine, demi-gods/spirits not gods. they would therefore include all monsters, and creatures such as furies muses and nymphs and satires. This was my thesis by the way, so it is a well researeched ideas. I can recommend some bokks on the subject if you like.

Please do!Much of what I read so far were exclusively on the internet and the Bible.

 

Please give me some books on the subject!

 

 

The Greek Magical Papyri in Translation: Including the Demotic Spells: Texts

Arcana Mundi: Magic and the Occult in the Greek and Roman Worlds: A Collection of Ancient Texts

Magika Hiera: Ancient Greek Magic and Religion

The Ancient Mysteries: A Sourcebook of Sacred Texts

off topic a little but very interesting is- http://www.amazon.com/Magic-Ancient-Egypt-Geraldine-Pinch/dp/0292722621/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1319820628&sr=1-1

 

and look at the works of Mary Beard

there might even be something in the golden bough,

trying to find more, but my thesis is on floppy disk! must be old. i'll post some more when i think of them.

 

Another quick point to remember is that, as the romans romanised the gods of the conquered peoples by combining them with roman gods and renaming them, the early christians did the same with many pagan gods, by turning them into demons angels and saints.

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Roman witches (at least those in literature) often called on demons to help them perform their antisocial (evil?) acts.

 

In honour of Halloween, here are list of Roman witches:

 

Canidia and Sagana - Horace wrote two poems about these witches, one slightly humorous and the other quite sinister.

 

In Satire 1.8, Canidia and Sagana are dressed in black, have pale skin, long nails and wild hair. They shriek and cackle. They come to a graveyard at night when there is a full moon and pick herbs, tear apart a lamb and pour blood on graves to conjure up spirits. They bury a wolf

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Research Daemons and Titans. They are angels and/or demons. These entities are much like average humans in that they appear angelic when benevolent & demonic when angered. They are often recalled in mythology as hero's, demigod's & lesser deities. In reality the were normal people. Through choice, perseverance of faith in themselves' and a clear willed path to ascend. Sought to be closer to the gods/god and couldn't wait around to be promoted (so to speak). They developed, each on his own, or were born with the ability to live indefinitely (immortal). This doesn't mean they couldn't die through combat, suicide and tragedy. The gods sometimes granted them the ability to resurrect if slain for this exceptional behavior. The story of Jesus is a rather well known one.

 

Archangel Michael is an example. He is often depicted slaying a dragon. This is symbolic of an internal struggle in which the illuminated part of the Daemon gains complete control over its darker side. He becomes a Saint and the protector of mankind. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucifer/Prometheus would be the dark side of Michael. I believe Michael appears in Jewish and Islamic texts as well.

 

Other names of interest that should help: Leviathan,Behemoth, The Seven Princes' of Hell, The Seven Archangels of Heaven, Roman Deities, Greek Mythology, Sumerian Religion.

 

WARNING!

"HC SVNT DRACONES"

Pursuing knowledge through this way may cause 'Carneval Brain'. Self Illumination will soon follow, keep this to yourself (it can be dangerous to publicly state what you've become), you will soon run into other Illuminatus. Because of you're new ability to see the world as it really exists. You'll literally drown in a flood of epic information inundation proportions. In these stories and myths, you may recognize yourself. This means it's time to assume your persona seeking to become immortal.

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