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WIN!!! Legio17: Roman Legion at War

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UPDATE by UNRV.com:

Win a free download of Legio XVII: Roman Legion at War, comment or asks the author a question below

and stand a chance to download it for free Legio XVII: Roman Legion at War

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The purpose of this post is to tell you about an historical fiction ebook I just published, "LegioXVII: Roman Legion at War" and why I think you may be interested in reading it.  First, I want to mention that this is my first post here, but I have been a fan of UNRV for the last four years.  I used it extensively during my research.

 

Why the book?  I wanted to create an image of Leg XVII beside that of Teutoburg Forest!  I first heard about 9 AD way back in 1960 and found it unsettling.  How did this disaster happen?  Fifty years later, I think we all pretty well know how it happened: poor Roman leadership and a very clever adversary.  Leg XVII only existed for 50 years.  It was never reconstituted after 9 AD.  My book gives the Legion a history that takes place during the 2nd Punic War, but is not involved with Hannibal.

 

Another reason I wrote the book is because I felt I had something unique to add.  Now I love ancient battles as much as anyone, but, in addition to battle scenes, I wanted to describe the intense planning that underlies a successful outcome.  To do this, I drew on my 28 year active duty career in the U.S. Army where I served at the platoon, company, battalion, and brigade level.  I was also in the Pentagon for 24 years as a staff officer and civilian on the Army Staff, the Joint Staff, and Office of the Secretary of Defense.  Operational and tactical level planning has been my life.

 

In the book, I tried to be historically accurate concerning the 2nd Punic war and with my characters.  Any errors are unintentional.  Let me know what you think!  I'd appreciate your perspective.    

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thanks Onasander, the author seems to be very low key, a rare thing,

glad you postet the link for everyone to have a look...

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UPDATE by UNRV.com:

Win a free download of Legio XVII: Roman Legion at War, comment or asks the author a question below

and stand a chance to download it for free Legio XVII: Roman Legion at War

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I have seen evidence Scipio Africanus wrote a art of war. While the main work is obviously lost and cant be easily reconstructed with confidence, what do you think his main focus in reforming the outlook of the roman military and political elite would of been, what lessons, maxims, principles would he of emphasized the most..... and do we see this carried on by later military commanders behaviorally, up to and including the far flung social wars?

 

I thought I start you off with a easy question.

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I am in! :)

 

Hi Legio17, thanks for a great competition. Do you have a favourite author of novels set in roman times?

Hi Jhm718, Thank you for your participation and easy question to start me off.  I enjoyed reading Robert L. O'Connell's, "The Ghosts of Cannae," Random House, 2010 because it taught me something.  It was well researched and uncovered new information about the Battle of Cannae.  I used some of his conclusions in my book.  The other book I recently read really scratched an itch I've had for years.  I wanted to be with the Legionaries as they marched cooked their meals, and fought and R.W. Peake's book, "Marching with Caesar-The Conquest of Gaul," did it for me.  This 2014 Smashwords' book takes place at the soldier's level, but is mostly silent at the planning level.  My book fills that gap.  Thanks for the question.  

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I have seen evidence Scipio Africanus wrote a art of war. While the main work is obviously lost and cant be easily reconstructed with confidence, what do you think his main focus in reforming the outlook of the roman military and political elite would of been, what lessons, maxims, principles would he of emphasized the most..... and do we see this carried on by later military commanders behaviorally, up to and including the far flung social wars?

 

I thought I start you off with a easy question.

Osasander, I can see why you're a Senator!  Glad you didn't ask a tough question!  I think I'd rather be asking you questions.  And yes, I feel intimidated, but I'll give it a shot.  My understanding of Scipio was that he was personally flexible in his thinking and use of troop formation.  He initiated a novel use of the Triarii in Spain and ensured his Legionaries were trained and healthy enough to march and fight.  I've incorporated both principles into my book.  History is full of examples of inflexible commanders who did not "love 'em and lead 'em." Today's US Army's number 1 priority, as it has always been, is the mission, but troop welfare is an integral part of accomplishing the mission.  Scipio understood that and it permeates my book.  Thanks 

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Looking forward to the read. How did you handle the planning in your text. Was it similar to S3 planning?

 

David J Winter

Author of The Fall and Rise, a story of Constantine (review on this site in 2010 by Ian Hughes)

Hi Mr. Winter, I think I detect a kindred soul!  Yes, I was the S-3 of the 2-15 Inf Battalion and Ass't S-3 of the 2nd Brigade, 3rd, Inf Div.  Lots of planning for battalion vs battalion exercises and REFORGER experience.  Additionally, I was exposed to strategic and operational planning while on the Joint Staff in the Pentagon.  My take away, we have a lot of smart and dedicated commanders.  It's humbling.  In my book, I have the Centurions and Tribunes discussing how to fight a particular battle.  There's differing viewpoints, pro and cons, and the commander makes the decision.  I also do it with the commanders opposing the Romans.  Thank you  for your post.   

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Excellent! Love historical novels, history, and things which illuminate leadership, and character, or lack thereof.

We share a common appreciation!  I think you will recognize that fact in my book because the backdrop of Leg XVII, the 2nd Punic War, is historically accurate. Leg XVII is not directly involved with fighting Hannibal, but Hannibal's presence in Italy impacts Leg XVII from it's initial creation as a Legion to its last battle.  Leg XVII is sent on an independent 30 month mission to the Cisalpine Gaul and Austria to take care of Roman business long neglected because of Hannibal.  My main character, Manius Tullus is a good commander with enviable character traits.  There are others in the Legion who fall short and he had to deal with them.  I think my book won't disappoint you. 

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When you say Cisalpine Gaul and Austria, you mean Northern Italy and Im guessing the Tyrol.... which is close to Italy and was the Northern gate into Italy... a essential corridor to break any opportunistic movements in and out of Italy by Hannibals supporters, or other hostiles....

 

I might be wrong about the locations, but thats pretty smart, a theater wide cordon. Its always bothered me the Romans couldnt secure their own territory from blatantly alien, fast as hell couriers sending messages to and from Hannibal while in Capua to Spain.

 

In your opinion, how did the Romans set up their legions in the North? Did they quickly retrace and reclaim Hannibals route in the Alps, redouble patrols around Marseilles, set up a elementry coast guard near Capua to check trade, and use spies and double agents, or were they a mix of that and thick headedness (Rome Knows Best), or just completely, miserably lost and demoralized, effectively turtling?

 

I toss and turn in my assumptions here. How effective is a supreme, Executive Unicameral Senate at setting and executing such a diverse program of strategies?

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Ancient Rome STILL has much to teach us today! What do you think will be the next "revelation"?

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