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lothia

Military mobilization of Africa

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Ave Civitas,

Still working on my novel, The Bandit King (All about Alaric).  I am a little confused about Gildo and the reaches of his command.

He was count of Africa.  Was that a military district?  The title count suggests it was.
If so, how far did the military district extend?
Did it include Africa Procunsularis, Mauretania Caesariensis, Mauretania Sitifensis, Numidia Militiana, Numidia Cirtensis and Tripolitania?

If it did, and if he wanted to mobilize the whole army (When Stilicho declared war against him) would he need to enlist the Vicarius of Africa?   The counsuls and praefects of Africa?   Surely the Praetorian Praefect of Italy would tell the Vicar of Africa, "No."  How could he supply his troops?

It seems like such a daunting task, getting everyone on the same side of the line.
Any information and sources (in English, I am handicapped that way) are appreciated.

Again, thanks in advance.
Tom

Edited by lothia
update question

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The comes Africae was the commander of the field army of Africa.  There was a separate comes Tingitania for the Mauritanias.  Gildo had the special title of magister utriusque militiae per Africum.

A H M Jones says that the comes Africa also controlled the frontier guards; but that instead of alae and cohortes under a dux, the frontier was guarded by barbarian tribesmen (gentiles) under several praepositi settled along a frontier wall (fosse) on the condition they maintain and defend it.

Hard to see how he could have rebelled without getting the support of the civil governors.

Edited by Pompieus

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 Pompieus,

Thanks for your reply.  Yes, that is the way I see it too, but was wondering if perhaps Africae was managed a bit differently.  Comes Bonifatius took sides in a power struggle (don't want to call it a civil war, but perhaps it was.  That must mean that Bonifatius had the support of the praetorian praefect and the vicar.

Again, thanks.

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Could be, the sources (Claudian, Zosimus V, and Orosius VII.36) are not much help.  But the special title conferred on Gildo (Claudian says he ruled from the Atlas to the Nile (?)), the fact that he was a Moorish king, that he cut off the grain supply to Rome, remained neutral in the war between Theodosius and Eugenius, held his office for 12 years, and negotiated with Eutropius and Arcadius indicate he had wide control.  Gibbon says he "usurped" the administration of justice and finance;  but was it before or after he rebelled?

Edited by Pompieus

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