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caesar novus

Illuminating video/youtube series?

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During lockdown or whatever, have you found some youtube/vimeo/whatever channels that are both educational and fun? In the ancient Rome realm, I have been subscribed to well known popularizing scholars Darius Arya and Mary Beard, but would welcome other suggestions. Darius has a channel with odds and ends at https://www.youtube.com/c/RomancultureOrgWeDigRome/videos and "Dame" Mary has various colorful documentaries found at https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=mary+beard

Edited by caesar novus

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The grizzled godfather of that Top Gear TV car series gave top marks to this car technology channel I subscribe to https://www.youtube.com/user/EngineeringExplained/videos. It is so clever in explaining pros and cons of car tech that I almost forget that cars bore me (aside from my crush on econo supercar Alfa Romeo 4C shown below). I like the way he lays out issues by diagramming on a whiteboard, for instance why an electric car is efficient but electric trucks tend to be a disaster. Can't really dispute his physics and math.

I like the way he explains for example how dumb the typical approach of adding a turbo to a small engine is - to avoid damaging knocks they have to dump in extra fuel simply to cool the cylinders, not even to burn and extract energy! Then he explains innovative combustion approaches that keep rolling out to challenge his Tesla.

Alfa-Romeo-4c-full-stripe_600x.jpg

Edited by caesar novus

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One of the most eye opening nerdy tech channels for me is https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCynGrIaI5vsJQgHJAIp9oSg/videos and especially his deep comparisons of ww2 fighter plane tech. They have a dry feel since he assembles them while holed up in far flung hotels as a resting airline pilot. But his well documented findings can be amazing. Allow me to exaggerate his issues a bit without his lengthy nuances, so as to show how important the themes may be.

For instance the usual narrative is backwards, where the Brits gifted Merlin engine technology to make the US P51 a war winner. Actually the Merlin design incorporated US style enhancements all jammed oddly to squish into the Spitfires narrow cowl, for instance with both superchargers sharing a shaft and not a proper intercooler between the stages. It was complex and the US ripped them out of P40s in favor of boring Allisons. The Me109 had similar space problems where they couldn't fit a second stage supercharger in the cowl, but at least made the first stage uniquely variable speed.

Anyway back to the P51, which maybe shouldn't have been developed anyway. The earlier available P47 was capable of escorting bombers anywhere with multiple use of British paper mache drop tanks. A well documented conspiracy prevented use of more than occasional drop tanks because the B17 was supposed to defend itself. The P47s weren't used when bombers had such high death rates that they were grounded for long while. Later Greg shows the coverup in denigrating p47 ability and pretending waiting for unique P51s was needed.

Well, I am explaining this poorly, so will try a diagram showing why US fighters other than p51 and Corsair tended to be chubby. Effective multistage super and turbochargers take a lot of space for ductwork and intercoolers. Here is a p47 view which doesn't do justice for it's sleeker head-on profile:

06.jpg

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Gopro vlogging on youtube now extends to walkabouts of Roman sites in amazing detail with even surround sound, such as the Prowalk Tours series. I find these play best at youtube's 1440p setting on any laptop. If it has poor speakers then some stereo headphones will pay off, and of course hit the youtube button to expand into fullscreen: 

 

 

I haven't fully watched these 2 but usually they are even better than being there live in some ways, with drone segments and good weather, etc. He has several versons of each of these, depending on your preferences, and there are similar series by others. https://www.youtube.com/c/ProWalks/videos

Edited by caesar novus
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Gosh, I see how that Pompeii series goes on at least to part 6, then there are ones on the Roman forum, Capua amphitheater, etc. If you want a change of pace to something both Roman and super scenic, try his new drone channel with:

 

 

and then follow up with his highly worthwhile walking version of Capri's notorious Tiberian palace. I have youtube run these a bit fast, but stay ready to pause at the best bits. Again, this seems almost better than real visits where you arrive quite winded from the climb (documented on his other videos):

 

Edited by caesar novus

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Last winter, I believe it was, I discovered the ProWalk tour videos and was hooked.

I "took" the Pompeii tour - all six hours of it. I had to take a break to fix supper, but ate it in front of the computer as I continued the tour into the evening. I enjoyed it. Yes, he walks quickly but I didn't find that annoying at all. If I wanted to see more of something, I paused the video. I have always wanted to go to Pompeii and I must say I feel as tho I have.

Another day I took the tour of the city of Rome - I forget how many hours that was - five? Up and down streets, historic areas, etc. I was over whelmed by the crowds at the Trevi Fountain! And I wasn't really there, but I couldn't wait to get away from there. ha  Altho found it fascinating too.

Then I visited The Colosseum. Oh my, what an eye opener. I couldn't believe the crowds there, in fact I spent more time watching out for the people in front of me, coming at me, and beside me, then seeing the sites of the Colosseum. Felt like I was there. But again, I thought the video was wonderful. 

There were a couple other tours I watched, but I can't recall right now which ones. Thanks for sharing the Capri tour. I enjoyed it.

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I never found hot, crowded Rome enjoyable until I focused on the outskirts. Besides Ostia Antica which is more shady and less crowded than Pompeii, I adore taking a long Sunday morning walk on the Appian way when vehicles aren't allowed. It has major uncrowded archeo sites (in good shape) on the end closer to Rome. The outer part has tons of humble monuments with the sober lifelike sculptures that I love, apparently tombs of freed slaves showing how they made good.

Near dawn there are no tourists - I alone got off the train miles outside of Rome at a military base near the way. No danger of getting lost because the one path out is lined with graphic pictures of a sentry about to shoot anyone straying out of bounds. The actual Roman road is lined with umbrella pines and you mainly encounter dog walkers from the discrete set back mansions. The temperature is dewy sweet, but the paving stones are chariot-pounding rough on poor footwear.

I encounter typical Italian eccentricities, like they fail to unlock the on-way entrance to a major site so I have to bushwack an endless trail to the back entrance. I try the closest deli to the way, which you would expect to be a tourist trap but makes a sublime sandwich to my specifications that I can still taste in my mind. I continue the walk into southern Rome which is pedestrian unfriendly, but has for instance lesser known unpatronized museums like a power station newly converted to ancient Roman displays.

The ProWalk guy is fairly knowledgeable, but misses some of the less crowded and serendipitous routes which I sometimes post in his comments. In some cases I can see places and visitors are gentrifying into a wealthier, more crowded, and less interesting mode since I visited. There are quieter periods than shown, like the long end of day when Pompeii stays open quite late.

ProWalk has recent competition with just unbelievable technical qualities like 4k and better resolution. It pays to go into youtube settings to ensure it is giving you the max res of your device, and maybe bump up the speed to 1.5x or whatever is the most your modem can handle. I don't have a Roman themed one handy, but check out this unbelievable one on Norway Fjords https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhVOvt2teCs

 

Edited by caesar novus

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The tour of Rome included a walk to the Circus Maximus and the streets and area there. No crowding really, and I found it so interesting. Very nice with quiet streets and trees.  I believe the Pompeii tour must have been toward the end of day as you mentioned, because it seemed as tho by the end the sun was beginning to set and I worried it would be dark before "I" got out of there. lol

Thank you for the additional info and I will check it out.

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Wow, I tried routing prowalk and other videos to my 4k TV with youtube app and it is stunning. Didn't try this earlier because I thought I would have to leave my google password sitting in the TV, but they allow me as anonymous for free. For some reason I can run 4k at double speed that would cause jerkiness on my laptop, which helps for instance on a 6 hour video walk thru Jerusalem. Sitting really close gives great immediacy as if folks might bump into you, altho I have to reduce over vividness with TV settings.

Some really good vids to look for are Hadrian's Villa and also the Appian Way. I didn't find great ones, but will post a teaser that lets you imagine how good an Appia Antica one could be if they would just walk or bike continuously without a lot of chit chat:

 

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And another direction to seek are hi-res videos of Roman museums. These typically are not so available or done very well, but are getting increasing acceptance from museum directors. Take for instance the National Museum of Rome, an oddly quiet, cool collection of ancient stuff handy to the central train station. I see a long video with Greek narration that pans too fast, and a too short video below by a travel book writer who misled me by saying Hadrian's Villa wasn't worth visiting. Here is a web site with more virtual tours - I think I will seek one of the Roman subsection of the Vatican museum: https://joyofmuseums.com/museums/europe/italy-museums/rome-museums/national-roman-museum/

 

Edited by caesar novus

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