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dnewhous

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The digireads version of the Kings of Britain doesn't list a separate translator from Geoffrey of Monmouth.  This suggests that Geoffrey of Monmouth is the translator.  Which, if you believe in God, isn't a problem.  It's actually a little bit humourous.  It's not as flowery a translation as the Penguin Classics version.  If it weren't for the authenticity of Geoffrey of Monmouth's own translation, I'd recommend it. 

That's what funny about this and some real questions about the authenticity of historical sources come in.  What if the person sitting across from you is the source of the "manuscript?" 

Also, the dragon Mercury is also known as "Woden."  And Wednesday is named after him.

According to the wikipedia Woden = Odin.  Same with Britannica.

The jape about Lancelot getting eaten by Mercury wasn't that helpful.  I think the story and I'm sorry i haven't had time to read it is that Mercury who is Merlin eats the Green Knight.  That is offensive in that the Green Knight is like the guardian spirit of Britain.  Ever play Civilization II Gold with the fantasy realm version?  If your capital is taken a guardian spirit will appear giving you a reasonable chance of retaking it.  Mercury is welsh!

I do remember the significance of the Roger Lancelyn Green book.  "Sir Athur and his Knights of the Round Table" is considered the original title of the story because it is the original title of the story in English.  Remember Sir Gawain and the Green Knight was written by JRR Tolkien first, which is pre WWII but not as early as Sir Arthur.

The trouble is that Hollywood keeps mining Le Morte d'Arthur, the earlier French titled book, for more of the story.  Especially Linet.   

Now I remember the key fact of History of the King of Britain which is extraordinary.  The first king of the Britons is named Brutus.  This can be confused with Julius Caesar.  The title king of the Britons does not appear with Brutus in Le Morte D'Arthur.

Yvain is another knight.  He is not Uther.  King Urien's son in the story of Perceval.

The original castle was at Carlisle.  That castle is south of Hadrian's Wall.

I see no real evidence Mercury ate anyone.

Edited by dnewhous

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Mallory's book, Le Morte d'Arthuris considered as something of a gold standard in Arthurian mythos and much of modern story telling is derived from it, though there has been some significant diversion in tv and film in recent decades. You might be interested in this

Brutus of Troy - Wikipedia

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I make a lot of errors.  Upon review, the castle that is "only a model" in Monty Python's Quest for the Holy Grail does not look like the landmark that is at the beginning of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (1971).  If that's from the 7th century that's one heck of a build.  It looks medieval!

Winchester is mentioned in the History of the Britons.  Le Morte d'Arthur uses the term "Camelot" but I don't see where the two are connected.

Yvain mentions Carlisle Castle, it is right up against Hadrian's Wall and obviously the landmark of the movie Camelot.  Percevel calls Yvain King Urien's son.  So it looks like Arthur was mooching a Roman fort.

 

The only tourist attraction in Winchester is called the Great Hall.  There are castles in the area that might do for sight seeing.

 

Edited by dnewhous

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Camelot has been given in a large number of alternative spellings, but the upshot is that learned opinion says Camelot appears in the 12th century, long before Thomas Mallory standardised the place. It's origins are actually a little vague, but gradually became more defined.

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The castle used in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (1971) is gone.  That is a travesty.  That's the most popular king Arthur movie.  The most important part of history is preserving landmarks and its gone.

 

I forgot about the Travels of Marco Polo and I don't know if I ever knew about the Decameron, which does not appear to have been published until modern times.

Edited by dnewhous

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It looks like Genghis Khan moved into the Forbidden City and took his title in Chinese.  He was the start of the Yuan dynasty.

I remember something else about history.  If you examine Greek and Egyptian history closely, 1174 BC is the year that everything changed.  Not exactly 1177 BC.  There are now more eras than ever in Egyptian history.  And I think that is the best year for making a division between the copper and the bronze age.  That would mean video games would influence historical analysis and I don't necessarily think there's anything wrong with that.  When would be the iron age?  I don't know.

This is known as the Late Bronze Age Collapse.

I do remember the iron age was 4th century BC in Ohio.  That was a very advanced gifted program in elementary school.  I don't remember what the event trigger was.  I'm fairly certain it was in Athens, Greece.

Edited by dnewhous

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