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guy

Vesuvius killed in Pompeii within 15 minutes

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Interesting hypothesis:

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A giant cloud of ash and gases released by Vesuvius in 79 AD took about 15 minutes to kill the inhabitants of Pompeii, research suggests.

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The study confirms that the inhabitants had no escape, and most of those who died suffocated in their homes and beds, or in the streets and squares of the city. Isaia’s model estimates the gases, ash and volcanic particles would have engulfed the city for between 10 and 20 minutes.

“It is probable that dozens of people died due to the rain of lapilli that fell on Pompeii after the eruption, but most of them died of asphyxiation,” Isaia said, adding the pyroclastic flow would have reached Pompeii a few minutes after the explosion.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/mar/22/vesuvius-wiped-out-all-life-pompeii-15-minutes-study-pyroclastic-flow-cloud-gases-ash

 

Summary: Interesting hypothesis, but it is not proven, yet. Apparently some residents were able to run to the beach in a failed attempt to escape Pompeii. This probably took more than 15 minutes.

 

guy also known as gaius  

 

 

Edited by guy

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Yeesh. Did you happen to view another video there titled "A Day in Pompeii -Full Length Animation"? 

Around 1pm. I would have gotten the hell out of there! 

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12 hours ago, Crispina said:

Yeesh. Did you happen to view another video there titled "A Day in Pompeii -Full Length Animation"? 

Around 1pm. I would have gotten the hell out of there! 

 

Thank you for reading my post.

Yea, that was a good video, too.

Living in California, I have learned to live in denial. We are all waiting for "the big one." LOL

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It's known there was a number of pyroclastic flows which were halted by the town's walls. Eventually a flow overcame the obstacle. Asphyxiated? Archeological forensics demonstrates that the sudden heat of the flow was enough to boil a brain and cause it to erupt (evidence from the cellars at Baiae). In one town (Herculaneum?), a woman was caught by the flow in the middle of the street and torn limb from limb by the turbulence. 

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