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Ah i loved Chemistry, it was the one lesson i really looked forward to, if my maths had been better i would have taken the subject beyond GCSE all the way to degree level, but as i'm dyslexic with numbers... well i can dream.

 

Back to the latin point.

 

History has always fascinated me even since childhood. Now depending upon your area of interest depends upon whether latin is relevant.

 

I think most of you guys on here would find latin of use as you're all 'classicists' to some degree (interested in Roman history at least). Since the Romans wrote and spoke latin it's quite useful to have it on side, but it's not essential. Many of the classical works have been translated into English; Ovid, Virgil, Tacitus, Livy etc. So say you had to do a dissertation on a classical subject you wouldn't be lacking primary sources.

 

As my speciality is medieval English history, which is my real buzz, i found my dissertation encountered one major grievance that i lost alot of marks for. The lack of primary sources addressed, finding the sources is difficult in the first place and 2/3rds of the few you do find are in latin with no English translation around so; William of Newburgh, Matthew of Paris, St.

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Hello Latin speakers,could one of you helpful chaps translate the Latin name of the European red squirrel for me?Thanks,Longbow

 

Red Squirrell=Sciurus Vulgaris.

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Well if you want to say Red Squirrel literally, it would be:

 

Sciurus Rutilus or Sciurus Ruber or Sciurus Roseus

 

Lets see here:

 

Sciurus, -i , masculine - squirrel(that's what sciurus literally means and its also second declension)

 

Vulgaris, vulgaris, vulgare ( its an adjective) - it means usual, common, commonplace, everyday

 

So " Sciurus Vulgaris" means The Everyday or Common Squirrel.

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Thanks for the speedy reply :)

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Guest Shannon

I'm not really sure if this is the right message place but my latin teacher is having a baby... and suggestions for what I could write in Latin on a card. It does not have to be historical or anything, just in Latin.

 

Thanks so much ~~Shannon

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hmmmm, I've wanted to know how to say "The roman empire fell becuase of its number system."

 

P.S. Viggen, there is now a link to the page you are already on from my post.... thats got to be silly.

Edited by Sextus Roscius

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Guest Pandora495

I need a translation done if possible, I have tried numerous english to latin translation sites and they are terrible. I would like the following translated:

 

Poison girl with a vampire heart

 

I'm going to be getting a tattoo and I would like to have the above in latin. Please help if you could. I have also wanted to learn latin for sometime now, does anyone know of any good programs for learning?

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Oh, what have I gotten myself into. Well, here's what everyone requested:

 

For Pandora's answer: A poisoned girl with a vampire heart. ----> Venata puella cum lamia corde.

A BIG NOTE: ( You can also use femalla, which means a young woman, girl. For vampire, you can use lamia, striga, and strige, but they don't directly mean vampire, they mean either witch bogey, evil spirit, a screech owl(which is a bad bird omen), but heres the thing, all in common mean one who eats children/ or drink their blood. Lastly, there are many words for heart. Such as pecte( means breast, heart;feeling soul), robore( means military strenght, main element, heart, might, power), and animo( means mind,spirit,intellect,and courage...)

Note: learning latin by yourself is extremely hard, no computer program can master you at it.

 

For Sextus Roscius' answer: The Roman Empire fell because of its numbers system.:

Romanum Imperium quod sui numerorum constitutionem cecedi.

Note( I'm not sure if I'm right, but this the closest I know, there are so many words for sytsem and fell.

 

For Shannon, here's what I have in mind: I hope your pregnancy goes well.---> Tuum conceptionem spero bene ivi.

Note:(I'm not sure about goes (ivi)

 

Oh by the way Shannon, tell me if you find the sentence not adequate.

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Guest Pandora495

Thank you so much Flavius for translating that for me, I really appreciate it.

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OH I know people are not bashing the brillant numbering system of the Romans. Its quite logical once you get the main rules of it done. Such as how the genitive case is used in conjunction with the number system. Heres an example: duorum virorum- two out of the men. Its really quite a creative system with that example being applied to all the Roman numbers it works really well. Heres another one: XIV- ten and one from five or 14.

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Ahhhh, This is my first post getting back from my vacation in Michigan over the Thanksgiving break which has left me exhausted, but there was something to cheer me up the minute I signed on, a promotion to equestrain! It seems I married into a good family at last...

 

Anyways, I was wondering how to say "Yearly Bright Eyes" not a very usual thing but I'm having fun with a friend by playing a elaborate set of clues and would like to know how to asy it.

 

Also, I want to know how to say "The Trials of Sextus Rocius"

Edited by Sextus Roscius

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For Sextus:

 

Yearly Bright Eyes---> Anuus lucidus oculi.

Note: You can also use these substitutions for bright: serenus, clarus, candidus,albus, and nitidus, but its better you stick with lucidus. Oh, I was sure if yearly was an adverb, so I put it in the adject. Yearly in latin adverbial form is quotannis.

 

The trials of Sextus Roscius---> Judicii Sexti Roscii. (note: Judiccii can also be Juditii. )

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