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Marcus Caelius

Looking For City Map Of Rome

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I've just ordered the Empire Wall Map, but I've been looking for a decent city map for years. I've found a couple of possibilities online, but they're a tad pricey. There's also a very nice computerized map available, with ~25 layers, for $35, but I would first have to buy CorelDraw or Adobe Illustrator which, again, raises the price out of reasonable limits for what I want.

 

Essentially, I'm looking for a good companion for the various Roman murder mystery series I like to read, as well as something considerably better than what's in front of the book, "A Walk Through Ancient Rome."

 

Any help appreciated.

 

ETA: I'm at work right now, so can't post links to what I've found online.

Edited by Beady

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I have an absolutely excellent map of Rome (italian text) including all finds up to the printing, which I bought in Rome about 15 years ago. Unfortunately, I cannot put my hand on it at this instant - I have plumbers in and my work-room is topsy-turvey.

 

Also useful is Guida di Roma Antica by Romolo A Staccioli - also in Italian. It covers the city region by region in immense and reliable detail.

 

The plan of ancient Rome fascinates me, and i have found many good maps of central areas in a wide variety of books and guides. Articles on the "marble map" (I assume you know about that?) are also helpful.

 

But it is the outlying areas - as it were - like the Aventine, that are hardest to find detail on.

 

When in Rome I usually snap up any new guides or books I see going (my Italian is non-existant but I manage to read enough, I think) and walk the streets to get as good an understanding as i can.

 

Over the years I have built up a useful personal workbook which brings together plans, reconstructions, pictures etc from every source possible.

 

I'll be very interested to read what sources others have.

 

Phil

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I'll be very interested to read what sources others have.

 

Sounds like you're vastly further along than I am. Still, this is what I've got so far, that is easily available:

 

This is a very basic map of the Seven Hills, with descriptions of who/what was on each.

 

This is the computerized Ancient Rome Vector Map I mentioned. I think it would be the most useful, but between it and CorelDraw the total price could be $200 or so.

 

For the really dedicated, there's the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World, starting at $375.

 

Then, there's this one by W. B. Clarke. You can purchase a poster/print for $225, although there's a copy floating around online that you can download for free.

 

I just now discovered this series of maps, that may be the most useful of all.

Edited by Beady

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There's a great book I use by Gilles Chaillet. It has a series of maps of the city, street by street.

 

Unfortunately, the book is in French and is titled "Dans La Rome des Cesars". The maps are all pull out and show incredible detail.

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This link has numerous maps from the Ancient Roman Empire, trade routes ,battles etc, but if you scroll down about 3/4 of the page there's a few maps on the city of Rome itself

 

http://intranet.dalton.org/groups/rome/RMAPS.html

 

Hope it helps

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This link has numerous maps from the Ancient Roman Empire, trade routes ,battles etc, but if you scroll down about 3/4 of the page there's a few maps on the city of Rome itself

 

http://intranet.dalton.org/groups/rome/RMAPS.html

 

Thanks, but I already knew about those. Looks like I've pretty much mined all the internet has to offer on the subject. :)

 

Anyway, I'd like to hear some opinions on the Ancient Rome Vector Map . Does it look like it might be worth getting CorelDraw, so I can use the map? I've been thinking about getting a graphics program, but CorelDraw is just a tad pricey (but cheaper than Adobe Illustrator).

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The university of Texas has a good page on maps which i tend to use most.If you scroll down a bit it has maps for,

# Plan of Republican Rome

# Plan of the Roman Forum and its Vicinity at the Time of the Republic

# Plan of the Imperial Forums and their Vicinity

# Reference Map of Ancient Italy. Northern Part.

# The Growth of Roman Power in Italy

# Reference Map of Ancient Italy. Southern Part

I dont know if these types are what your looking for,hope it helps.

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The university of Texas has a good page on maps which i tend to use most.

 

I finally went with this one. It banner-prints out nicely onto 9 pages which, if carefully trimmed and assembled, makes a rather nice map that can be made to fit into a 22" x 28" standard poster frame, and is fairly easy to read.

 

I'm still wondering about the vector map (see my earlier posts), and have set my daughter-in-law (a graphics designer) to work on the problem.

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The university of Texas has a good page on maps which i tend to use most.

 

I finally went with this one. It banner-prints out nicely onto 9 pages which, if carefully trimmed and assembled, makes a rather nice map that can be made to fit into a 22" x 28" standard poster frame, and is fairly easy to read.

 

I'm still wondering about the vector map (see my earlier posts), and have set my daughter-in-law (a graphics designer) to work on the problem.

 

Yes, your link goes to the most detailed map of ancient Rome that I have seen, except for the incredibly detailed but unwieldy series Carta archeologica di Roma, which divided the city into nine squares and apparently came out in nine two-part volumes (one part was the folded map of each square, the other part was the explanations) around 1964. I have two volumes of this, bought secondhand -- I have never seen any others.

 

The problem with reading maps of ancient cities, Rome in particular, is that they are usually a "palimpsest" -- they show buildings and streets from different periods, overlaid. If you had a map of London that covered the buildings and streets of three or four centuries, all on one map, I guess that would be hard to read as well.

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The problem with reading maps of ancient cities, Rome in particular, is that they are usually a "palimpsest" -- they show buildings and streets from different periods, overlaid.

 

That's why I'm interested in the vector map and CorelDraw.

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