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Guess the ancient city!

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I'm sure it's Vindolanda.

 

 

I will watch the programme and see if you're right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(you ARE right, but I want to maintain an air of mystery and suspense.)

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I watched the programme (and will review on the other thread) and, as was alluded to before, you are 100% correct.  VERY well spotted indeed, I think, as I couldn't place it myself at first, despite many, many visits to Vindolanda. 

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Hi all,

 

I have had some difficulties to post a picture.

Still, for copy-paste text in a message, but not for posting a picture.

 

Next: Guess the ancient city!

Game on!

 

Auris Arrectibus

post-9835-0-06490000-1422990919_thumb.jpg

Edited by Auris Arrectibus

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..somewhere in northern africa?

 

p.s. i wonder how the coastline was 2.000 years ago, seeing that theatre so close to the ocean...

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Would this cityhave been home to Artemisia Dracunculus?

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Hi GoC,

 

That's a bit cryptic answer. I think you mean by Artemisia Dracunculus, the herb tarragon. And so referring to the city Tarraco, nowadays Tarragona.

The two don't have any mutual roots.

 

In english the city is sometimes spelled as Tarragon.

Riddle solved.

And by that: Correct answer!

 

The amphitheatre of Tarraco was build in 2nd AD next to the seashore. I took this picture standing on top of the Praetorium Tower, next to the circus

which is for most parts subterrenean. When you visit the nearby Placa de la Font for lunch, you still recognize the outline of the circus below the pavement.
 

You're next.

Auris Arrectibus

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Yeah, to be honest, I just knew it, and i wanted to let it run a little longer.

 

Anyway, while we're being a bit cryptic, try this place:

 

My first is in Hell, but not in Hades,

My second’s in Latins, but not Pelagones

My third is in Novum but not in Homo

My fourth’s not in Major, but is in Domo

My fifth’s in Dracunculus, though not in Artemisia

And my last’s in Maritima, but not in Caesaria.

 

‘The Place by the Pool’ is how I am known.

And I’m the third in the list: Colchester, Cologne. . .

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Hmm . . . you didn't mention the key word, but I'll let you have it anyway (if you promise another cryptic in return.)

 

The key word was 'Lincoln' . . . a shortened form of Lindum Colonia, itself a shortened form of Colonia Domitiana Lindensium.   Lindum became the provincial capital of Flavia Caesariensis when the province of Britannia Inferior was subdivided in the early 4th century.

 

It is one of only 3 cities that retain its identity as a Colonia in its modern name.  The other two are (as stated above) Cologne and Colchester.

 

Back to you.

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Okay, I try to be cryptic in return:

"There must be twelve of these and they were demolished by Nike."

 

Solve this one and you will know the city. So the picture below I took

where some of them they were found.

 

Auris Arrectibus

post-9835-0-56086100-1424195251_thumb.jpg

Edited by Auris Arrectibus

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Tough one.  Stories of what all the Gods got up to have evaded me thus far, and Wikipedia (which is where I learned everything I know) isn't much help.  We therefore must deal with statistical likelihoods.  Most likely, based on sheer volume of accessible remains and relevance to Nike, would be Ephasus.

 

Therefore my guess is Ephesus.

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No not Ephesus.

 

Nike is the cryptic one, focus on the imperative verb.

 

AIthough, in the same city the godess Nike is depicted on the pedestal of a column
with the Chi-Rho sign on another side: Both pagan and christian symbols.

The sheep fell about 80 years after the column was erected.

 

Auris Arrectibus

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