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aiden12

What's the last book you read?

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I've read Boardman's book too, but it was a bit limited I though ( I was working on the Apoikia at the time ). Also if I remember well it did lack some data relating to the first euboeian colonies. Snodgrass is also old even if still usefull especially for military historians ( which is Snodgrass' main field of research ). As for Finley's well it's at least 25 years old even if their is no doubt the man was a great historian, one also has to remember that a specific ideology did guide his work ( as it did for most of the authors of that time )

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I've read Boardman's book too, but it was a bit limited I thought ( I was working on the Apoikia at the time ). Also if I remember well it did lack some data relating to the first euboeian colonies.
As I'm sure you know, every book seems to lack that data! Regardless I found it to be a satisfactory primer for the subject. I'm more disappointed with the periphery that the Euboeans are regaled to in Snodgrass' book.

 

For the Euboean colonies I've had better luck with journal articles. David Ridgway's work in Italy and Pithekoussai is quite helpful.

 

I'm only reading Finley's next because someone gave it to me. Otherwise I'd read Coldstream's Geometric Greece next but I need to find a copy.

 

Is there anything that you would recommend that you've come across in regards to the Apoikia (Euboean specifically)?

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Well about the apoikia when you want something which is Italy related you don't have much choice and have to look for the Congresso sulla Magna Graecia, yearly congress held at Tarento since at least 20 to 30 years, on a different thematic each year + the latest archeological discoveries italian province by italian province. Italian is the main language but there are fore most volume a brief synopsis of each article in english or even full articles in this language ( as well as german and french ). Otherwise I don't have the title of the book or article in mind but not five years ago was a paper published on the very first euboeans colonies which have been founded in mainland Greece just opposite the island, I had a conference on the subject and this is why I remember it.

 

Otherwise it is a pity that this site ( http://www.apoikia.org.uk/index.aspx ) has no more informations.

 

But if you want I can look a bit at my university library to find the books I used when I worked on the subject and publish it at hellenica-logos.org

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I suspect that I will be obliged to review FG's books (looks around nervously :D )...so far I must say that they would be very useful sparking an interest in intelligent children. in the Roman world. Im not sure of the age range they are aimed at , but I would have very much liked to be 7 or 8 again and been passed a copy of "Pirates".I would be in the back garden with a wooden sword chopping away at barbarians.

 

Actually, I did an informal review of FG's Roman Mysteries series in back in April.

 

As I've read all the books in the series, I was thinking of expanding on that initial introduction to the series that I'd posted, with emphasis on the educational aspects of her books. She carefully uses primary source material in setting the scenes for each of her novels. At my public library, in fact, we're got a "Roman Mysteries" booktalk for children scheduled for later this summer.

 

Pertinax, we have all ages at my library reading FG's books, both young readers and adults (although our scheduled booktalk will be geared for children this summer). I agree with you -- I would very much like to be 7 or 8 again, too, and discovering this series! But since I steadfastly refused to grow up :D I think I'm enjoying them just as much!

 

-- Nephele

Im so sorry I overlooked your review, (and I agree very much with your thoughts), this means Im off the hook and can concentrate on the poisons in "Sirens" now.

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What's the last book you read? What was it about? Did you like it?

 

 

Due to a dearth of unread Roman historical fiction, I'm currently rereading two books:

 

(1) Adrian Goldsworthy's "The Punic Wars." That's my "breakfast/dinner" book, i.e., I'm reading it while having my early and evening meals. I'm partial to his writing style (loved his "Caesar, Life of a Colossus," but was indifferent to his "In the Name of Rome").

 

(2) Colleen McCullough's "Fortune's Favorites" (the 3rd of her mammoth 6-volume Masters of Rome series). This is my "subway/Sundays at dad's" book. This particular installment is inferior to the first two volumes, but I love her treatment of the major characters of this period of the Republic (even if she is way over the top with Caius Julius -- far too hagiographic for my tastes). I also love the fact that she includes many, many maps. The paperback versions of her books weigh in at 1,000 pages a pop, so it's a labor of love.

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I've just finished the Foundation trilogy and I, Robot, and now going on from my Isaac Asimov streak. I've just begun reading FG's The Pirates of Pompeii, and so far I enjoy it very much. it's the first book I've ever found that is settled after the Vesuvius's eruption, while I've read half a dozen books about Pompeii's last days.

 

I've begun on Adrian Goldsworthy's "The Punic Wars." a few months back during the semester too but never had time to finish it. Probably going to chew through that one quite soon too.

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Just to revive this one a bit. I have completed the first three of Caroline's Roman Mysteries, which were an absolute delight to read, and I shall be buying the rest of them. I did go back to give the Scarrow (Under the Eagle) a second chance, and found that I quite liked some of the characters, but the book still left a far too modern taste in the mouth. Really, this could have been set anywhere, which is not what I want in an historical novel! After constant drilling and hacking at Germans, and poor representations of the female characters, I had to totally give up - this is not for me. I guess it's a boy's own thing. So, I've reverted to my non-fiction historical shell and am at present engaged on Mussolini's Italy by R.J.B. Bosworth - a fascinating work. And an interesting fact emerges from it so far - the patron-client relationship still thriving throughout the Italy of the 19th and 20th centuries!

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Just to revive this one a bit. I have completed the first three of Caroline's Roman Mysteries, which were an absolute delight to read, and I shall be buying the rest of them. I did go back to give the Scarrow (Under the Eagle) a second chance, and found that I quite liked some of the characters, but the book still left a far too modern taste in the mouth. Really, this could have been set anywhere, which is not what I want in an historical novel! After constant drilling and hacking at Germans, and poor representations of the female characters, I had to totally give up - this is not for me. I guess it's a boy's own thing. So, I've reverted to my non-fiction historical shell and am at present engaged on Mussolini's Italy by R.J.B. Bosworth - a fascinating work. And an interesting fact emerges from it so far - the patron-client relationship still thriving throughout the Italy of the 19th and 20th centuries!

 

Well, you can't please all of the people all of the time. I'm puzzled by your response - 'the modern taste' - since that is what all historical fiction does, if it is readable. Would you prefer that I should write my novels in Latin?

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I've just begun the Colleen McCollough series myself. Finished "First Man in Rome" and have just begun "The Grass Crown." Prior to that, my last books were "The Family" by Mario Puzo, and "Worker's Compensation Claims Law" :)

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Ave, Simon Scarrow! Aside from your own, what novels set in ancient Rome most inspired you? Are there any exemplars of historical fiction more broadly that you would recommend?

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I've just recently finished The Assassination of Julius Caesar by Michael Parenti. I thought it was a very thought provoking read, it's written from a Popularis point of view and gives us a different perspective of the late republic, mainly Populares V Optimates, we see a different side to the events and to the main players that played a major part in the eventual demise of the Republic. A thoroughly enjoyable book (maybe not for MPC though! :blink: )

 

BTW welcome to Simon Scarrow, I've enjoyed the "Eagle" series, Macro and Cato are great characters, I can see where Augusta is coming from with the "boy's own thing" comment though.

Edited by Gaius Paulinus Maximus

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I've just recently finished The Assassination of Julius Caesar by Michael Parenti. I thought it was a very thought provoking read, it's written from a Popularis point of view and gives us a different perspective of the late republic, mainly Populares V Optimates, we see a different side to the events and to the main players that played a major part in the eventual demise of the Republic. A thoroughly enjoyable book (maybe not for MPC though! :blink: )

I have the book, have had it for sometime now but have yet to get around to reading it. Germanicus was trying to get me to read it back in the day...I'm currently re-reading Holland's Rubicon, great book.

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I've just recently finished The Assassination of Julius Caesar by Michael Parenti. I thought it was a very thought provoking read, it's written from a Popularis point of view and gives us a different perspective of the late republic, mainly Populares V Optimates, we see a different side to the events and to the main players that played a major part in the eventual demise of the Republic. A thoroughly enjoyable book (maybe not for MPC though! :blink: )

I have the book, have had it for sometime now but have yet to get around to reading it. Germanicus was trying to get me to read it back in the day...I'm currently re-reading Holland's Rubicon, great book.

 

I'd certainly read it if I were you, It's certainly different than most of the books on the subject of Caesar and the late Republic.

 

Rubicon is a great book too.

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The Poison Paradox by Timbrell the eminent toxicologist, I shall be injecting figs all week(apologies to The Augusta). The book hinges on the Paracelsian doctrine of "the poison is in the dose" , that is -you can kill with most things if you get the dose right (water for example), its just that some caterpillars and the water from your lilies will do it quicker. Beyond this of course the line is to be drawn between medication and assassination, one man's fish dinner is another man's zombie powder (fugu toxicity), I believe CSI had an episode on this very subject?)

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Poison-Paradox-Che...5377&sr=8-1

 

I also finished Justinian's Flea by Rosen

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Justinians-Flea-Pl...5783&sr=8-2

 

which I will be suggesting as a good "late period" general reader when I post the review.A very articulate work.

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