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M. Porcius Cato

Uppity Female Mortals

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We Mac users name all of our tech toys--iPods, iPhones, MacBooks, etc. The names I choose are typically drawn from the mortals who defied the gods in some way (Prometheus, Phaeton, Arachne, Atalanta, etc), and I'm looking for some more great names, preferably female, as part of the same theme. Any ideas?

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We Mac users name all of our tech toys--iPods, iPhones, MacBooks, etc. The names I choose are typically drawn from the mortals who defied the gods in some way (Prometheus, Phaeton, Arachne, Atalanta, etc), and I'm looking for some more great names, preferably female, as part of the same theme. Any ideas?

Io, Niobe, Echo, Daphne, Aegina, Callisto, Iphigenia, Semele, Lamia, Leto, Tantalus, Sisyphus, Danaid, Ixion, Lycurgus, Tyresias, Paris.

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Cloelia defied a king, if not a god. She was a Republican-era (your kind of girl, MPC) Roman virgin given to the Etruscan king Porsena as a hostage. She escaped from him and swam the Tiber back to Rome. Although she was promptly returned to him (those Romans were sticklers for doing the honorable thing!), Porsena was so impressed with her courage and defiance that he released her along with some other hostages. He also rewarded her with a magnificent horse (so she wouldn't have to take to swimming to escape any more) and gave the Romans a gift of a statue of a woman on horseback, representing Cloelia.

 

-- Nephele

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How about Ariadne, who gave Theseus his ball of string to find his way round the Labyrinth? Think of all those wires inside your Mac...

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We Mac users name all of our tech toys--iPods, iPhones, MacBooks, etc. The names I choose are typically drawn from the mortals who defied the gods in some way (Prometheus, Phaeton, Arachne, Atalanta, etc), and I'm looking for some more great names, preferably female, as part of the same theme. Any ideas?

 

I call my iPod 'Darth iPod'. He's black and shiny.

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We Mac users name all of our tech toys--iPods, iPhones, MacBooks, etc. The names I choose are typically drawn from the mortals who defied the gods in some way (Prometheus, Phaeton, Arachne, Atalanta, etc), and I'm looking for some more great names, preferably female, as part of the same theme. Any ideas?

 

I call my iPod 'Darth iPod'. He's black and shiny.

 

 

That sounds vaguely naughty, Flavia. Oops - that's me in Tartarus, Neph!

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That sounds vaguely naughty, Flavia. Oops - that's me in Tartarus, Neph!

 

Neph innocently gazes skyward ;) and pretends not to have a clue...

 

-- Nephele

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What about Helen, or Pandora? I often call my cat 'Pandora' because of all the trouble her curious little mind wanders into...

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If it's an apple product, might I suggest "Eve"

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What about Helen, or Pandora? I often call my cat 'Pandora' because of all the trouble her curious little mind wanders into...

 

I have a Pandora. It's a great name--my iPhone really does present "many gifts". And Pandora was the Greco-Roman Eve, which makes for a great Apple connection. (As does Atalanta and Helen.)

Edited by M. Porcius Cato

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Here's another classical female rebel for you: Astyoche.

 

She was a sister of King Priam of Troy and, when Troy fell and she was taken captive by the Greeks and brought to Italy, she helped to set fire to the Greek ships. This forced the Greeks to settle in Italy, with their descendants contributing to the stock of the later, emerging Romans.

 

Although Astyoche was only one of several bravely rebellious women captives, I chose her for an anagrammatical reason. If you add the surname "Cott" to her name (and every self-respecting, anthropomorphized tech toy should have a surname), then "Astyoche Cott" is an anagram of "Cato's tech toy".

 

Plus, "Asty" makes a cute nickname.

 

-- Nephele

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