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Hello

Here is a study I made about polished metal surface aircraft.

I used the famous MiG-15 as a subject, in order to understand and develop new methods of depicting metal polished aircraft.

I will do a follow on to this one to study the depiction of weathering on aircraft with these kinds of surfaces.

All comments are most welcome.

Best regards to all

 

MiG-15novocopy.jpg

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Very good as usual. Will you/ have you had your material published? Have you any paintings of Spitfires/mustangs/P-47's etc?

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Publication standard work. How do you keep the proportions accurate? Do you paint over linework?

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The MIG-15 and the Sabrejet were almost carbon copies.

 

Not quite, however...

 

The Mig used a russian version of a british jet engine.

 

The Sabre and the Mig both used data derived from that gathered from german research in WWII, so they were guided toward the same results.

 

Aerodynamics concerning flight at transitional speed (ie, speed of sound and compressibility effect) were not clearly understood by either manufacturer at the time, and since the designers of both sides were pretty much at the same point, they came to similar conclusions about methods of coping with such obstacles.

 

Interestingly, against north korean pilots the americans did very well, as expected. The covert use of russian pilots - with WWII experience in many cases, came as something of a shock later, and in fact the americans were almost outclassed in their tenacious attacks.

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Interestingly, against north korean pilots the americans did very well, as expected. The covert use of russian pilots - with WWII experience in many cases, came as something of a shock later, and in fact the americans were almost outclassed in their tenacious attacks.

 

Hence the phrase, 'Yeah, and I'm a Chinese jet pilot!'

 

Caldrail and GO gave you an idea, perhaps you could draw a Sabre to make a comparison of the two. It would also give you more practice on the shiny metal skin of the planes (not that you seem to need much practice!)

 

Still, please continue to post your artwork, I find that it really adds to the forum.

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Interestingly, against north korean pilots the americans did very well, as expected. The covert use of russian pilots - with WWII experience in many cases, came as something of a shock later, and in fact the americans were almost outclassed in their tenacious attacks.

 

 

Almost? The USAF controlled the skies over N.K. Pyongyang got the Tokyo treatment. It was exceptionally difficult to tell a crisp gook from a crisp Russian - they went down, in glory, over enemy territory. And usually high-tailed it to China when the Yanks showed up. The enemy never went south of the lines - if they knew what was in their best interests.

The 'kill' count was heavily in favor of the USAF.

The only point I tried to make, is that the planes were similar in design.

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1565y4y.jpg

 

I believe that, minor differences considered, Sabrejets and Mig-15's were very similar indeed. I have heard anecdotes which state that piston engined aircraft such as Corsairs and p-51's often got the better of the jets in that conflict -is this true?

Edited by Northern Neil

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1565y4y.jpg

 

I believe that, minor differences considered, Sabrejets and Mig-15's were very similar indeed. I think the simile 'Carbon copy' applies here. I have heard anecdotes which state that piston engined aircraft such as Corsairs and p-51's often got the better of the jets in that conflict -is this true?

 

Depending on the situation, a slower plane can knock out a faster plane - and did. The Russians didn't come in until Stalin got tired of supplying the gooks and Chinese with coffins.

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Hello

Thanks to all for your interest and comments.

Trying to answer some of the questions :

 

To Northen Nelly: Painting of WWII: not yet: I am doing 2 illustrations at the moment (action illustration featuring combat scenes - not profiles like this one): one depicting Hellcats and a Zero and another P-38's and a Rufe (seaplane version of the Zero); others (WWII, WWI and modern are also planned).

 

To Caldrail: I use, as a basis, a line side view of the plane, load it up to Photoshop, make a version of it and paint with layers.

 

To Julius Ratus: I actually started painting the classical T-34 some months ago, but lost some interest in it and put it aside; maybe in some time i will restart it.

 

To DecimusCaesar: I had my work Publisher in the first 2 issues of Ancient warfare; I am planning a series of prints about the Ancient World; please keep in touch.

 

To Gaius Ocatavius and Moonlapse: thanks for your comments.

 

This illustration will serve as the basis for a series of prints depicting MiG-15 aces of the Korean war; It will be available soon.

 

Best regards to all

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..To Northen Nelly:..

 

I LIKE it!! ;)

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