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    The Ancient Roman Doctors were not nearly as highly regarded as those in Greece. The profession itself, outside of the legions, was considered a low social position, fit for slaves, freedmen and non-latin citizens, mainly Greeks. While there were some who were respected, most were considered just as they were, cheaters, liars and quacks. The bulk of doctors, at least early on, were self-taught or apprenticed practitioners who simply claimed to be healers, with little basis in real medical knowledge.

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    While the application of medicines and cures was a guessing methodology at best, with some undoubtedly dangerous use of elements such as toxic mercury, the ancients used very sophisticated Roman Medical Tools.
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    Ancient Roman Medicine was a combination of some limited scientific knowledge, and a deeply rooted religious and mythological system. While knowledge of anatomy was quite impressive, and many surgical techniques were only surpassed in the modern age, the application of medicines and cures was simplistic and largely ineffective. Much of the Roman system was adopted from the Greeks, and primarily the teachings of Hippocrates...
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    The Roman Triumph, especially in the Republican era was the crowning achievement of a Roman General. The procession of the Roman army, allowed within the city gates for this special event, captured leaders and slaves, and any treasure looted on campaign, was a grand spectacle of enormous proportions. The historical tradition of the ritual came to Rome from the Etruscans. The first triumphs were those celebrated by Romulus, the legendary founder of Rome himself. Rome celebrated the victory of its generals for over 1,000 years, approaching nearly 500 in total by the end of the western empire. 403 AD marked the end of the tradition as the emperor Honorius was the recipient of the last true Roman triumph.
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    With continuing political strife, Sulla's appointment to lead the war against Mithridates was short lived. Through the intrigue of Marius and Tribune Sulpicius Rufus, Sulla was stripped of his command. Sulla's March on Rome proved his desperation to preserve his own imperium, and was the first time a Roman general did so.
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    Some interesting news regarding the Roman Empire:
     
    Chipping Ongar Dig Points To A Hidden Roman Town
    Pompeii Find Shows Secrets Of The Samnites
    Caesar's Wife Statue Made Whole Again
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    Roman Weddings
     
    The Roman wedding is the basis for many modern western marriage customs. While there are some differences (especially regarding ages and choice of spouse), the similarities that have survived are quite remarkable...
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    Roman Marriage
     
    Prior to 445 BC, intermarriage (connubium) between patricians and plebeians was forbidden. After that the children of such marriages took the social rank of the father, be it patrician or plebeian, regardless of the mother?s status. After both families had agreed to a marriage, and the consent of the parents or persons in authority was given, the marriage contract was drawn up and signed by both parties....
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    The next great 'imperator' to rule Rome after Gaius Marius was Lucius Cornelius Sulla.
     
    Thanks to Sulla?s own personal memoirs, which have been lost to history, though preserved through the works of others, such as Plutarch, we actually know a great deal about him and the time period. Sulla was cunning and ruthless when necessary, but a brilliant politician and formidable commander as well. While he didn?t necessarily begin the ?Fall of the Republic?, the activities of Sulla were definitely a major contribution....
     
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