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Faustus

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Everything posted by Faustus

  1. Faustus

    Global Warming

    A representative of Friends of the Earth recently stated that if everyone simply kept to speed limits, 1.5 Billion litres of fuel would be saved in Britain every year. That equates roughly to about
  2. Faustus

    The Art Of Offending

    In the spirit of the thread: Gerard Baker's Barak Obama: The Child - The Messiah - The Obamessiah <Click Here> And going back to humor, does anyone find this funny, compared to the New Yorker cover for instance? I found it funny in the beginning, but after a while it became repetitive and boring. Really Kosmo! I found humor in it, all the way to the final scene when Ob enters the plane with his studied grace and half-smile to hosannas of "yes we can!" Reactions may depend a lot on the extremes we have seen here in the media, or have not seen if outside the US. BTW I also laughed out loud at the scene of "Bush The Ignorant" and the later scene of Bush, with action speeded up, looking a little like a Hitler giving a guided tour to dignitaries. (although I don't agree with it) Faustus
  3. Faustus

    America Votes 2008

    Hahahahaha! now that's funny!
  4. Faustus

    What did the Greeks ever do for the Romans?

    The gift of the Greeks to Romans I
  5. Faustus

    America Votes 2008

    "Yea, Verily", and it came to pass: your answer lies within this link.....
  6. Faustus

    What did the Romans ever do for the Greeks?

    [quote name='Julia C
  7. Faustus

    The Art Of Offending

    In the spirit of the thread: Gerard Baker's Barak Obama: The Child - The Messiah - The Obamessiah <Click Here> And going back to humor, does anyone find this funny, compared to the New Yorker cover for instance?
  8. Faustus

    Before the Drinking Party

    Roman Banquet Before the Comissatio (the drinking party) was the cena (banquet). While reclining on the necessary couch, the guests had to have a way of disposing of their food scraps; a way which wouldn
  9. Faustus

    Before the Drinking Party

    "Banquets were occasions for the private man to savor his accomplishments and show off to his peers. The banquet was as important to the Romans as the salon to the eighteenth-century French aristocracy, as important even as the court of Versailles to the seventeenth-century nobility. The emperors kept no court. They lived in their "palace," on the Palatine Hill, much as the nobles of Rome lived in their private villas, with only slaves and freedmen for company (which of course meant that the palace housed the various ministries of government). When night came, however, the emperor dined with his guests, senators and others whose company he relished. The time of public "honors" and "government" of the Patrimony was over. The moment Horace arrived at his country retreat he invited a woman friend to join him for dinner, most likely a freedwoman, a well-known singer or actress. The banquet was more than just a meal. Guests were expected to express their views on general topics and noble subjects or to give summaries of their lives. If the host had a domestic philosopher or tutor on his staff, he would be asked to speak. Between dishes there might be music (with dancing and singing), by professional musicians hired for the occasion. At least as much a social manifestation as an occasion for eating and drinking, the classical banquet gave rise to a literary genre, the "symposium," in which men of culture, philosophers, and scholars (grammatid) held elevated discussions. Now the private man could relax at table. Even the poor people (hoi penetes), nine-tenths of the population, had their nights of revelry. During a banquet the private man forgot everything but his "profession," if he had one. Those who had vowed to devote their lives to the pursuit of wisdom celebrated not as the profane did but as philosophers. Ideally the banquet hall was supposed to resemble not a dining room but a literary salon; when this happened, confusion with popular merrymaking was no longer possible. [A banquet] then, meant the pleasures of good company, culture, and in some cases the charms of friendship. Thinkers and poets found it perfectly possible to philosophize about wine. The trickiest part of the evening, and the longest, was that set aside for drinking. Early in the dinner people ate without drinking. Later they drank without eating: this was the banquet in the strict sense of the word.....More than a feast, the banquet was a festival, and each man was expected to hold his own. As a token of festivity guests wore hats with flowers, or "wreaths," and were perfumed, that is, anointed with fragrant oil (alcohol was unknown, so oil was used as a solvent for perfumes). Banquets were unctuous and brilliant, as were nights of love." A History of Private Life - Paul Veyne
  10. Faustus

    Global Warming

    The actual topic started out as a cheap joke - see the first post on this thread! Thanks NN, I know that, and I've been there. This may not have all turned out the way you intended at the start, which is interesting in itself, but it has been worthwhile and valuable. Hats off to you! Faustus
  11. Faustus

    Global Warming

    "Kyoto is, in many ways, unrealistic. Many countries cannot meet their Kyoto targets. The targets themselves were arbitrary and not based upon science". GW Bush; June 11, 2001 Salve A, we are slipping sideways here from the topic, but I'd like for terms used here to mean something: Rancorous: Bitter and sharp in language or tone; rancorous: an acrimonious debate between the two [candidates]. Rancor: Bitter, long-lasting resentment; deep-seated ill will. SYNONYMS: enmity , hostility , antagonism , animosity , animus (These nouns refer to the feeling or expression of deep-seated ill will. Enmity is hatred such as might be felt for an enemy: the wartime enmity of two nations, [for example].) Is any opposition to beliefs held by one, when opposed by another, or not held by another for any reason, whether "reasonable" or not to be defined by the word(s) rancor, resentment, ill will or enmity hostliy, antogonism, animosity......? Does that definition not then bar any (reasonable) debate, and in so doing render debate moot? was there any unreasonablness in the President's words? At the time of Kyoto, the US Senate voted, July 21 1997, 95 to 0 against "Kyoto". This, treaty vote, was taken under a Democrat President (Clinton) and a Democrat Senate. It seems that all the comments made by Bush in the example above were still actually true at the time, and would not fit the definition of "acrimonious". One can easily accept a terminology that said: "spirited debate", or "debate seemingly based on narrow national interests" etc. The terms used by the president were not rancorous. Terms used by others might well be termed in that way. Faustus
  12. Faustus

    Global Warming

    The use of the word is revealing in itself. Can you give one example of a statement or quote that would fit that definition? I watch the "political" side of this issue closely, and I'm aware of none that could be fairly attributed. Caldrail speaks eloquently to the "other" side of the issue without my adding more there. Faustus
  13. On this date in history 39 years ago man first stepped onto the moon. Neil Armstrong, stepped from a ladder to the lunar surface with the statement "That's one small step for a man; one giant leap for mankind. ... That
  14. Faustus

    Global Warming

    Thanks L, and I for one did read your links to the degree they are pertinent Do we know how many inches sea levels have risen to create this phenomenon, and how much of that is human caused? Since the retreat of the continental ice sheets about 15,000 bp, the earth's climate has been warming with alternating cool periods as one would expect. Mountains subside through erosion; even Sea-Mounts are worn away and are reduced to lower levels. If their land areas were so close to sea level in recent times, and only a foot or two of sea level rise causes catastrophe for the inhabitants, then the compassionate thing to do would be to remove those people affected to safer conditions, including some representative wild life if it poses no exotic dangers elsewhere. Once again I invite you to take a look at some interesting information on solar activity which doesn
  15. Faustus

    Roman Drinking Parties

    Salve FVC, That title is unknown to me but is apt. The character Trimalchio, in the Satyricon was a freedman of enormous wealth, and today would be called a "millionaire". Cena Trimalchionis (Trimalchio's dinner) occupies chapters 26-78 of Satyricon by Gaius Petronius. The original title is P.A. Satiricon libri. The initials correspond to the author, Petronius Arbiter. The text was copied throughout the Middle Ages, and In 1664 the first critical edition, which included Trimalchio
  16. Faustus

    Global Warming

    <THE LAWNMOWER MEN> Get ready for the lawnmower inspector near you.... In a huge document released last Friday, the EPA lays out the thousands of carbon controls with which they'd like to shackle the whole economy. Central planning is too artful a term for the EPA's nanomanagement..... Thankfully none of it has the force of law -- yet. However, the Bush Administration has done a public service by opening this window on new-wave green thinking
  17. Faustus

    Urbs....Rome

    Some interesting facts about the development of Rome from ROME, Its people life and customs by Ugo Enrico Paoli (URBS - 2 parts ) ROME grew from a small hamlet on the Palatine into the greatest city of the ancient world. Her earliest inhabitants descended to feed their sheep and bury their dead in the damp and narrow valley where later the Forum was to stand. After ten centuries, when Constantine transferred the capital of the Empire to Byzantium, Rome covered an area almost twelve miles in circumference and had a large and closely packed population. The banks of the Tiber from the Porta Trigemina to the southern slopes of the Aventine had been covered with docks and quays to ensure an abundant and regular supply of provisions. Eleven aqueducts furnished a daily water supply calculated at 350 million gallons. In the fourth century A.D. the city had 11 public and 856 private baths, 37 gates, 423 parishes (vici), 29 main roads from the centre to the outskirts, to which must be added an enormous number of minor streets, alleys and areae, small squares scattered among the network of streets; 25 suburban roads; 8 bridges, 2 Capitols, 190 granaries, 2 large markets (macella), 254 mills, 8 large parks (all the open land that was left),11 forums, 10 basilicas, 37 marble arches, 1,352 fountains, 28 libraries, 2 circuses, 2 amphitheatres, 2 naumachiae for naval shows and 4 gladiatorial barracks (ludi). From the earliest times the population of Rome increased steadily, first through the assimilation of the neighbouring peoples, who came to live in the city, and secondly through the growth of Rome
  18. Faustus

    The Roman House or Domus

    Some More On The VILLA In the the Roman villa rustica "it is not certain where the slaves lived. We know, however, that there were their bedrooms (cellae familiares), the ergastulum, a kind d prison where recalcitrant slaves were punished with hard labor and the valetudinarium for sick slaves. When there was no villa urbana, the better rooms were reserved for the owner. An example of the Roman villa rustica is found in the (detailed "Floor Plan" of the) Villa of Boscoreale (If won't enlarge, "refresh") near Pompeii, famous not only for the importance of its ruins but also for the silverware found there (now in the Louvre. Its plan deserves attention. The villa urbana stood where a wide view of the countryside or sea could be enjoyed; it was a purely luxurious building, having no practical purpose or function like the farm; this villa in the complexity and richness of its rooms reflected the tastes, and bore witness to the wealth, of its owner. Some villas had no farmland attached, but stood in their own grounds surrounded by woods, parks and gardens. Such villas, sometimes called praetoria, increased in number during the Empire. Remains of them are found in Italy, France, Switzerland, southern Germany, England and North Africa. The practical spirit of the Romans, who fully appreciated the pleasures of life, introduced these large commodious villas, well cooled in summer, well heated in winter, wherever their armies and civilization penetrated. Many different types of this villa are to be found. Classical authors describe as a characteristic of the villa urbana that its peristyle was entered directly from the vestibulum and not, as in city houses, the atrium. But there seem to be exceptions even to this. In Pliny's Laurentine villa, for example, there was an atrium through the vestibulum; cuius in prima parte atrium frugi nec tamen sordidum. The rooms were variously grouped in separate buildings (conclavia, diaetae) connected by covered corridors cryptoporticus often fitted with windows." THE ROOMS OF A ROMAN VILLA The most important parts of the villa were: (1) The dining rooms (triclinia, cenationes).
  19. Faustus

    The Art Of Offending

    Many people in that link said that you can not make fun of Obama because he is black and their audiences will see their jokes as racist. This is how the democrats are using this cartoon, by showing that making fun of Obama it's racist and full of prejudice, by vilifying his opponents while they also victimize him. They make a media show and make harsh comments bringing the issue to spotlight and many people will think "poor Obama the nasty Republicans are making tasteless racist jokes about him" I don't believe that liberals and democrats are pissed off over the cover. They made it. Salve K, I have to agree with you, the Democrats are not P'd off. But Ob did denounce it, finally saying it was "offensive to Muslims" I don't know any Republicans who are P'd off either, not at all. To them it's as I said earlier; "typical", but amused at the dubious strategy. This just seems to be the accumulating detritus of a candidate's campaign which is beginning to appear a little chaotic. It's almost as if Ob needs things to renounce, or denounce, or to set straight to keep his thin resume from being discussed, ever..... BTW his wife is now out of the campaign, so we should let her alone. And his two little girls; he displayed them as JFK displayed Caroline John-John, and it seems a little of the same image. He later, expressed regrets for having done that, but didn't explain just why. There's plenty of raw material for political cartoons based on Mr. Obama, but we'll only see them in the Washington Times. During Clinton's 8 years, virtually all the political cartoons with him as the subject were based on his "weaker moments" which were shown as his being just "cute", endearing, sometimes knavish (but not too much so) or a "bubba", but an endearing bubba. Faustus
  20. Faustus

    The Art Of Offending

    We agree. Personally, I think the "muslim", "terrorist", "racist" and related adjectives on Senator Obama are so dumb that they can't benefit his opponents at all. In fact, such arguments can backfire on their authors, as implying they have no better argument for not voting for him. Salve A, your comment here might on first glance seem to depart from your earlier statement ("we agree") so let's be straight who the "authors" are, at lieast in this New Yorker cartoon. The authors are allies of Obama, imputing certain opinions about Obama as if they lay in the minds of most or just Republicans, and the laugh is on them. Almost all Republicans look at this cartoon (Altough few read the New Yorker, but they will now see this), realize they are being lampooned, and just say "typical...". They know at the same time these concepts do not comprise their opinions, and they very likely knock those ideas down when then hear them espoused, and are not the "authors" in the larger sense. Now try your best to turn the whole process around and apply it to your own groups and situations. Might it cause you to become more interested in the whole process, if you had allowed yourself to become complacent, or disintrerested? Don't forget, too, Nephele's calibration of "average" intelligence. Those below the 50% measure, or even lower comprise members of both parties. That is another problem for Obama. It probably had something to do with his speaking out in spite of probably sharing the opinion about Republicans. He has to realize: it's all a mixed bag. The constant bringing up of his differences, and things he would actually like to put to bed, make people think again,......and again, rather than settling down. And this once again puts him at the center of controversy. On the Racist mention; it all seems to come out of the Obama campaign, now as it did in the primary with HRC. It was he that said "They'll say I'm a muslim, and oh, by the way did you know he,s black?" recently. Almost everyone, below 50% and above that line know when they are being fed a line by a politician with a problem. One last comment. If you have to explain a "joke" it has lost it's value. If You have to explain it or justify it to those it was intended to serve, it's even worse. Humor is a "two edged sword". Faustus
  21. Faustus

    America Votes 2008

    On his upcoming trip to Iraq, the Middle East, and Europe - three count
  22. Faustus

    What did the Romans ever do for the Greeks?

    Salve, A. I think Athenian intellectual deeds speak for themselves. With all its limitations, their democratic model was unsurpassed along all Antiquity. Most of the time, they were hardly peaceful. Salve Amici Is there any reason for the advanced thought of the Greeks in scientific knowledge and political thought as expressed by their experiments in democracy? I have an undeveloped theory, which hinges on the island nature of their environment, the difficult conditions which prevailed, and a paucity of natural resources. All of these limited the exploiting of their environment so that trade and travel combined with exporting new experiments in self governing along with colonization and competition provided outlets for their creativity. These were tried and improved upon repeatedly providing feedback for successful models. I have nothing to back this up except high-blown theory, and I would be hard pressed to explain it; any thoughts on that? Faustus
  23. Faustus

    What did the Romans ever do for the Greeks?

    The Romans used the "inverted siphon" to do that. HERE'S A LINK describing a system of several Roman inverted siphons at Aspendos, Turkey. An inverted siphon will not deliver water to a higher elevation than the source of the pressure at the top of the header tank, but it will deliver water across a valley without an elevated gravity flow aqueduct serving as the "pipe". Today similar systems are used for sewage systems, which could be either sanitary or storm sewers. Inverted siphons by the Romans are probably more common than observation would indicate since some were entirely buried earthworks and not visible to the perception of the untrained eye. Faustus
  24. Faustus

    The Art Of Offending

    Exactly right Nephele. And in part, that's what the cartoonist relied on. Every cartoon will be seen in at least two different ways. Faustus
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