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  2. I say, "Throw him to the lions!"
  3. Last week
  4. This is a nice review of the Seleucid Empire (312-63 BCE). This empire was created after Alexander the Great died and his Macedonian Empire splintered apart.
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  6. Scott Savitz

    Novel on the Catiline Conspiracy

    I just published a book on the Catiline Conspiracy, entitled "The Fall of the Republic." While it is fictional, it adheres closely to the accounts of Sallust and other historical sources. Here is a summary: In 63 B.C., Catilina—an angry, corrupt politician—conspired with foreign powers and criminal elements to overthrow the Roman Republic. Exploiting those who suffered from inequality, he sought to destroy the republic in the name of the people. In the end, he nearly achieved through violence what he could not attain by inciting the masses with lies. This true story of the near-destruction of a great republic contains poignant lessons for the ages. "The Fall of the Republic" is available on Amazon, in both paperback and Kindle editions. Use the link below or search for my name. I hope that you enjoy it! https://www.amazon.com/Fall-Republic-Scott-Savitz-ebook/dp/B08HZBNYS5/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1600453425&sr=8-1
  7. Scott Savitz

    Book on Catiline Conspiracy

    I just published a book on the Catiline Conspiracy, entitled "The Fall of the Republic." While it is fictional, it adheres closely to the accounts of Sallust and other historical sources. Here is a summary: In 63 B.C., Catilina—an angry, corrupt politician—conspired with foreign powers and criminal elements to overthrow the Roman Republic. Exploiting those who suffered from inequality, he sought to destroy the republic in the name of the people. In the end, he nearly achieved through violence what he could not attain by inciting the masses with lies. This true story of the near-destruction of a great republic contains poignant lessons for the ages. "The Fall of the Republic" is available on Amazon, in both paperback and Kindle editions. Use the link below or search for my name. I hope that you enjoy it! https://www.amazon.com/Fall-Republic-Scott-Savitz-ebook/dp/B08HZBNYS5/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1600453425&sr=8-1
  8. Scott Savitz

    Book on Catiline Conspiracy

    I have just published a book called "The Fall of the Republic" on the Catiline Conspiracy. While it is fictional, it adheres closely to Sallust's account and other historical sources. Here is a summary: In 63 B.C., Catiline—an angry, corrupt politician—conspired with foreign powers and criminal elements to overthrow the Roman Republic. Exploiting those who suffered from inequality, he sought to destroy the republic in the name of the people. In the end, he nearly achieved through violence what he could not attain by inciting the masses with lies. This true story of the near-destruction of a great republic contains poignant lessons for the ages. "The Fall of the Republic" is available on Amazon, in both paperback and Kindle editions. Use the link below or search for my name. I hope that you enjoy it! https://www.amazon.com/Fall-Republic-Scott-Savitz-ebook/dp/B08HZBNYS5/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1600453425&sr=8-1
  9. https://www.skylinewebcams.com/en/webcam/italia/lazio/roma/pantheon.html https://www.skylinewebcams.com/en/webcam/italia/lazio/roma/roma-colosseo.html Enjoy, guy also known as gaius
  10. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-52911797 Here's an interesting older video describing the laser technique that makes 3D terrain maps that can examine the underlying terrain beneath the vegetation. This information was put on an open data website, allowing students of ancient Roman history to discover long-forgotten Roman roads and encampments in Wales and the rest of Britain. guy also known as gaius
  11. Ulpia Severina? A woman? Husband and wife? Both killed. I'll have to find out more.
  12. I think some of the features of the emperors may be totally imaginary. For many, if not most of the emperors, there is only numismatic evidence and a few sculptures to recreate these images. Carus and his heirs (Carinus and Numerian) may have been from either Gaul, Illyricum , or Africa. These diverse backgrounds would give very different physical features (eyes, hair, and skin) from those proposed. g.
  13. Oh, I thought Rome was famous for an actual sub Saharan emperor or two, who was technically of another race and wide culture gap. Maybe the case for some generals, but if we are talking only of Berber-ness for a couple of emperors I am less impressed with that as proof of Roman broad mindedness. Today (or for me, a few decades ago) if you travel deep south into Berber speaking areas it seems like you are getting more into a Euro comfort zone than the Arab coast. The Berbers are proud and distant, but are every visitor's favorite companions. Like guides who deign to lead you and feed you rather than engage in the banality of talk, but there is somehow an easy cultural compatibility. In contrast there is a jolting cultural transition for instance entering southern Egypt. Not a negative thing - it is way more friendly and less hard sell to Euro visitors than the coastal north. But now and probably 2000 years ago the sub Sahara would seem a less likely cultural seedbed for a leader of Roman life. The draft of my previous post tried to include map of Berber settlement areas in northern Africa with no luck, maybe png not supported? Anyway I stripped that out, along with accompanying caveats... EDIT: now it works:
  14. I didn't notice the cross symbols' meanings before.
  15. The Severan Tondo is contemporary with Septimius Severus, depicting Septimius, his wife and two children. The defaced face is supposedly Geta who suffered damnatio memoriae. I always found it interesting that Septimius Severus spoke with a Punic accent. (Historia Augusta, XIX.9) H His sister could scarcely speak Latin at all, XV.7: http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Historia_Augusta/Septimius_Severus*.html g.
  16. Portraits look Berber to me, with past experience of traveling north and south Algeria. But https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berbers#Antiquity sez: Smells like another case of trying to diversify historical figures to suite modern tastes, against (admittedly sparse) evidence, like Macedonian Cleopatra was a few years ago.
  17. Thank you. These are very powerful portraits, if they are even just close to being accurate. I would also like to see a similar images of their wives. 😎 The portraits of Septimius Severus and his children (Caracalla and Geta) certainly reflect their Carthaginian (North African) origins: Nero looks the part of the scoundrel: Here's another depiction of Nero from a different source: https://www.sciencealert.com/this-spanish-artist-made-a-life-like-sculpture-of-nero-and-it-s-just-how-you-d-imagine Thank you, again, guy also known as gaius
  18. Zoroastrianism was one of the competing religious faiths from the East during the history of ancient Rome. In fact, Zoroastrianism was the state religion of Rome's great rival the Sassanid Empire. In fact, Sassanian coins frequently showed a fire temple, important in the religion of Zoroastriansim. (Source: Sassanian Coinage Wikipedia) Here's a good video reviewing Zoroastrianism: If nothing else, I learned that Freddy Mercury from Queen was Zoroastrian. guy also known as gaius
  19. caesar novus

    Illuminating video/youtube series?

    And another direction to seek are hi-res videos of Roman museums. These typically are not so available or done very well, but are getting increasing acceptance from museum directors. Take for instance the National Museum of Rome, an oddly quiet, cool collection of ancient stuff handy to the central train station. I see a long video with Greek narration that pans too fast, and a too short video below by a travel book writer who misled me by saying Hadrian's Villa wasn't worth visiting. Here is a web site with more virtual tours - I think I will seek one of the Roman subsection of the Vatican museum: https://joyofmuseums.com/museums/europe/italy-museums/rome-museums/national-roman-museum/
  20. caesar novus

    Illuminating video/youtube series?

    Wow, I tried routing prowalk and other videos to my 4k TV with youtube app and it is stunning. Didn't try this earlier because I thought I would have to leave my google password sitting in the TV, but they allow me as anonymous for free. For some reason I can run 4k at double speed that would cause jerkiness on my laptop, which helps for instance on a 6 hour video walk thru Jerusalem. Sitting really close gives great immediacy as if folks might bump into you, altho I have to reduce over vividness with TV settings. Some really good vids to look for are Hadrian's Villa and also the Appian Way. I didn't find great ones, but will post a teaser that lets you imagine how good an Appia Antica one could be if they would just walk or bike continuously without a lot of chit chat:
  21. caesar novus

    How is your lockdown?

    I think "Corporate" just had their season finale, but about half of their shows really hit the mark with rare insights of looney aspects of being a white collar drone, so seek reruns. This is on Comedy Central channel which just now did the most shameful censoring of their "The Office" reruns. They had been butchering it a bit to allow longer commercials, but now brought cancel culture to bear in bleeping out words like "gay". In the closed captions it shows up as asterisks half the time, along with some other mildly non PC words. I noticed the Paramount Network will resume putting out a couple "The Office" reruns out per week - I hope uncut. We are back in hardcore shutdown with outrageous crimes in my neighborhood due to released prisoners, and mismanaged situations and catch 22s everywhere you look for law abiders, but it is just too tedious to recount. Been watching some Mary Beard about Romans on Youtube. She can be a loose cannon, so best to look for the more focused BBC produced ones.
  22. I just saw this awhile ago. https://www.theverge.com/2020/8/21/21395115/roman-emperors-photorealistic-portraits-ai-artbreeder-dan-voshart
  23. caldrail

    Persistance of Roman foot measurements

    The reason that french tvs are measured in inches diagonally is because that's an industry standard. The measure is irrelevant as such - merely it describes the size in relation to others. That said, I do note that Brussels appears not have noticed, and the French are notorious for their distaste of English terms creeping into their language.
  24. caesar novus

    How is your lockdown?

    We are reverting back to lockdown with dire penalties for not wearing masks. I made a rare stroll outside for a swim and increasingly gasped for air in the overheated effort. At the shore there were 3 police overlooking pretty much only me and I nearly fell down and passed out before daring to unmask. Same routine on return. Reminds me of another case of gov't zeal for safety. Large parts of the Fukushima mandatory evacuation was not justifiable based on radiation science, and some large number of elderly died from the disruption. Wiki: "Many deaths are attributed to the evacuation and subsequent long-term displacement caused by mass evacuation that was not neccesary for the most part", "The victims include hospital inpatients and elderly people at nursing facilities who died from causes such as hypothermia, deterioration of underlying medical problems, and dehydration.". Back to a closer example was yesterday's Autopsy tv show with a cautionary tale of Marlon Brando dying from self sequestering himself in a house with hidden black mold. LA media watched outside that same house where his son had killed his daughter's boyfriend. That daughter later killed herself in Tahiti, where the police wanted to grill Marlon if he ever returned to his getaway house (island) there. So superstar Marlon died in agony from a known lung-attacking mold condition at home, maybe due to not getting out for enough swims?
  25. caesar novus

    Hagia Sophia: UNESCO deeply regrets

    By now, you may have seen announcement of another Istanbul museum converting to a mosque. Another populist/nationalist blow to globalism and Unesco. Instead of posting links to the news stories which have a bunch of intrusive video ads, I will post one of the most interesting youtube video I have seen about the "why" of nationalism. Nationalism brings some crude accountability that may be missing not only in today's globalism but for those from the past who served distant empires. The lack of any nationalist connection at all can not only make war sacrifices seem pointless but promote worse behavior. Atkinson's "The Day of Battle" details WW2 atrocities against Italian women and children by troops from one corner of of the French empire, and other sources claim this continued into Germany. They had no altruistic stake in the war and expected plunder in exchange for their risks. Anyway, a bunch of documents from attics in the US fell into the hands of professor Weber that illuminated early mental development of Hitler. He thought OH NO, I don't want to be known as a Hitler historian, but the documents from Jews who were very early acquaintances of Adolph (then fled to the US) were just too important and newly explanatory of ultra nationalist impulses. I may be misremembering a few things since I first encountered this material, but: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmDK2VC53XY
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