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Onasander

Romans pioneering study of dark matter

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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131129101905.htm

 

Really? I get weirded out everytime I see them take gigantic sampled bigger than my thumb from fossils, now this?

 

Why cant we just find normal lead underground? We have like.... deep mines all over the world, I cant believe they are ruined, yet a little water protects the Roman lead.

 

And were the Romans that much better at making high quality, pure lead that we cant begin to match them?

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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131129101905.htm

 

Really? I get weirded out everytime I see them take gigantic sampled bigger than my thumb from fossils, now this?

 

Why cant we just find normal lead underground? We have like.... deep mines all over the world, I cant believe they are ruined, yet a little water protects the Roman lead.

 

And were the Romans that much better at making high quality, pure lead that we cant begin to match them?

 

If you read the article it actually explains why. Lead ore gets contaminated by radiation in the atmosphere before we can make lead out of it.

All metals made after 1945 are contaminated this way. This is why the ingots are so valuable, all metal submerged before 1945 is. High grade steel from pre-1945 warship wrecks is also much wanted for scientific experiments. I believe it's also a required element in geiger counters.

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To the atmosphere, so be it...... we can still mine raw lead and treat it in a confined environment..... I know quite well how steel and tin is made, I don't see what the technological hurdle is here. 

 

Zero excuse. Quit destroying artifacts for this crap. Lead isn't hard to make, if the Romans can make it, we can make it in a purified atmosphere tent, it's not a hard metal to work over.

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It's very stupid to have to rely on Roman era artifacts for this..... it's pure asinine laziness on the scientists part to melt lead in containment..... 

 

How is this different from pilfering roman buildings for building materials during the middle ages? Or claiming the only realistic way to put in a sewer was to dig through a ancient temple? Or the toilet paper was out, and the only thing we could wipe on is a ancient manuscript.

 

There is no such thing as black matter.... they are destroying real, tangible artifacts on a pipe dream. We get nothing tangible from this except disrespect for the past.

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Sure, that must be why no one is doing it and they're diving to the ocean floor instead.

 

:lol:

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Using electrolysis, you can separate oxygen from water.

 

Lead is found in the ground, raw.

 

You can work lead at very low temperatures, Ive used it welding before.

 

I think most high school chemistry teachers could pull this off rather easily.

 

Its just stupid, retarded laziness and a disregard for archeology and history that allows this. The Romans were not more advanced than us. Just a culture of laziness and stupidity, and trust of authority allows for this.

 

Im contacting my senator to put a stop to this. This is disturbing. We are doing the wrong thing here... given these are artifacts, Im pretty sure we have rules governing their importation, and the excuse given for destroying them assumes everyone hearing it is too mentally deficient to figure out its a lie. We already have everything we need to make similar lead using simple , garage techniques.

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To add to the explanations given above, I understand that for historical purposes the 'Present' is defined as 1950, because nuclear tests and explosions after this date have rendered carbon dating useless afterward.

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To add to the explanations given above, I understand that for historical purposes the 'Present' is defined as 1950, because nuclear tests and explosions after this date have rendered carbon dating useless afterward.

 

 

Really? I was always taught it was simply because the term began to be used in the fifties.

Boils down to the same thing, I suppose.

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