Jump to content
UNRV Ancient Roman Empire Forums
  • Time Travel Rome

Caesar CXXXVII

Caesar "illegal" march - T.D. Barnes view

Recommended Posts

So what law did it contravene?

 

The law which was allowing every Roman citisen to appeal for mercy to the People's assembly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The law which was allowing every Roman citisen to appeal for mercy to the People's assembly.

 

Had Caesar laid down his arms, he would have had that right, but no civilian law applied to men under arms. This principle extends even to this day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Had Caesar laid down his arms, he would have had that right, but no civilian law applied to men under arms. This principle extends even to this day.

 

Caesar was in his province and didnt commit any crime when SCU was voted. His march to Rome was his reaction for SCU. Since SCU was enacted all the Roman officials and citisens had right to kill him and thats why he has crossed Rubicon river.

 

Remember Catiline case? He and his followers were sentenced to death by senate and later it was found illegal. Cicero was exiled for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caesar's blatant refusal to disband his army upon the command of the Senate was all the justification needed to employ the Senatus Consultum Ultimum - it was, for all intents and purposes, an act of treason.

 

Claiming that the Senatus Consultum Ultimum was illegal simply overlooks the fact that, once he disobeyed the Senate's commands, Caesar was an outlaw and no longer entitled to the protection of Roman law.

 

Catiline was sentenced to death by the order of the Senate with the approval of the People's Tribunes. I do not recall a tribunician veto prohibiting the execution of either him, or those of his followers captured within the city proper. No, Clodius instigated the prosecution of Cicero for the executions more for political gain than a sense of legal right - in fact, it was Clodius that instituted the law in the first place.

 

Had the People truly been incensed by the execution of the Catilinarian executions, wouldn't Cicero have been prosecuted in 62 rather than 58 B.C.E.?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Caesar was in his province and didnt commit any crime when SCU was voted.

 

Caesar was already facing prosecution for several crimes, including his violation of the leges Fufia et Aeilia as consul and his illegal crossing into Germania and Britain as proconsul.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caesar was in his province and didnt commit any crime when SCU was voted.

 

Caesar was already facing prosecution for several crimes, including his violation of the leges Fufia et Aeilia as consul and his illegal crossing into Germania and Britain as proconsul.

 

 

Well, as long as he had imperium he couldnt have been prosecuted for any real or imaginative crimes.

 

Caesar's blatant refusal to disband his army upon the command of the Senate was all the justification needed to employ the Senatus Consultum Ultimum - it was, for all intents and purposes, an act of treason.

 

Claiming that the Senatus Consultum Ultimum was illegal simply overlooks the fact that, once he disobeyed the Senate's commands, Caesar was an outlaw and no longer entitled to the protection of Roman law.

 

Catiline was sentenced to death by the order of the Senate with the approval of the People's Tribunes. I do not recall a tribunician veto prohibiting the execution of either him, or those of his followers captured within the city proper. No, Clodius instigated the prosecution of Cicero for the executions more for political gain than a sense of legal right - in fact, it was Clodius that instituted the law in the first place.

 

Had the People truly been incensed by the execution of the Catilinarian executions, wouldn't Cicero have been prosecuted in 62 rather than 58 B.C.E.?

 

 

I think you hit the point here. But what about tribunes of plebs who tried to veto it and were attacked in the senate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

99 % of the Fasti were composed from less than c. 30 families

 

I'm pretty sure this statistic is incomplete or a complete fabrication. Source?

 

BTW, even if it were true that 30 families were contributing the majority of magistracies, it doesn't hold that this inequality is symptomatic of a lack of liberty. Consider a paragon of free speech like UNRV, where the top 30 posters (of around 2000 registered users) have contributed almost 2/3 of the posts to the forum. Obviously, there is nothing about equal rights that ensures equal contributions: some families cultivated politicians, whereas the vast majority did not.

 

 

Between consulship of Manius Acylius Glabrio in 191 BCE and first consulship of Gaius Marius only 2 homines novi were elected for consuls.

For 222 consuls elected between 218 BCE and 108 BCE:

 

24 were Cornelii

15 were Claudii

10 were Fulvii

9 were Aemilii

9 were Postumii

8 were Fabii

8 were Sempronii

 

I would say that it wasnt 30 famillies that were contributing majority of magistrates but even less. In fact the rank of consul was reserved for only about 20 famillies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

99 % of the Fasti were composed from less than c. 30 families

I'm pretty sure this statistic is incomplete or a complete fabrication. Source?

 

Between consulship of Manius Acylius Glabrio in 191 BCE and first consulship of Gaius Marius only 2 homines novi were elected for consuls.

For 222 consuls elected between 218 BCE and 108 BCE:

24 were Cornelii

15 were Claudii

10 were Fulvii

9 were Aemilii

9 were Postumii

8 were Fabii

8 were Sempronii

 

I would say that it wasnt 30 famillies that were contributing majority of magistrates but even less. In fact the rank of consul was reserved for only about 20 famillies.

 

Come on, finish the math. You've listed 83 consuls from 7 families. You've still got 139 to go and only 13 families to do it in--you're not even going to come close, even for the restricted time frame you've listed. Plus, you've only listed consuls, not the 10 praetors of each year, let alone the aediles, quaestors and tribunes. Let's face it: the notion that less than 30 families made up 99% of consuls (let alone all the magistracies) is a fantastic exaggeration.

Edited by M. Porcius Cato

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Come on, finish the math. You've listed 83 consuls from 7 families. You've still got 139 to go and only 13 families to do it in--you're not even going to come close, even for the restricted time frame you've listed. Plus, you've only listed consuls, not the 10 praetors of each year, let alone the aediles, quaestors and tribunes. Let's face it: the notion that less than 30 families made up 99% of consuls (let alone all the magistracies) is a fantastic exaggeration.

 

 

As we were talking about fasti i listed only consuls. But well, praetors also had fasti.

And tribunes of plebs were not magistrates. They were representants of plebs but not magistrates so you cant count them.

 

10 praetors? First was only one praetor and noone knows what he was really doing in the begining of republic. It was praetor maximus.

 

After judical power was separated from consulship there was 1 praetor. In the 4th century BC additional praetor for foreigners was added. After Sicilly and Sardinia became provinces 2 more praetors were elected. Sulla raised number of praetors to 8. Caesar raised number of praetors to 16.

Aediles were only 4. And questor was really a minor office which untill Sulla didnt even give the right to sit in the senate after term was over

Edited by Mosquito

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Come on, finish the math. You've listed 83 consuls from 7 families. You've still got 139 to go and only 13 families to do it in--you're not even going to come close, even for the restricted time frame you've listed. Plus, you've only listed consuls, not the 10 praetors of each year, let alone the aediles, quaestors and tribunes. Let's face it: the notion that less than 30 families made up 99% of consuls (let alone all the magistracies) is a fantastic exaggeration.

 

10 praetors? First was only one praetor and noone knows what he was really doing in the begining of republic. It was praetor maximus.After judical power was separated from consulship there was 1 praetor. In the 4th century BC additional praetor for foreigners was added. After Sicilly and Sardinia became provinces 2 more praetors were elected. Sulla raised number of praetors to 8. Caesar raised number of praetors to 16.

 

And in Cicero's day, there were 10. But none of this helps your case in the slightest: there's still no way that 99% of consulships or magistracies (no matter what offices are meant by the term) were dominated by 30 or 20 families. I wonder, do you really want to persist in this thesis?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It may be important for "family" to be defined within the context of this discussion, simply for clarity. Does a single family include the entire clan gens, or is it limited to each branch as defined by agnomen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I said 99 etc' I wanted to show the un-democratic nature of the Roman republic just before Caesar's day , that is the point .

Now numbers - since 200 BCE (not 59 or 91 or 133 or 167) there were 313 consulships (including Sufecti) .

Fasti is for Consuls , not Quastors and surly not T.P.

253 of these Consulships were held by 30 families (Gens) that is 81 % . More important is that 287 of the 313 were held by 44 families , that is 91.7 %

 

So , those numbers have any influence on my (and many) argument ?

It was a pure oligarchy , the poeple had no shrare in the government .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, here you got it, the list for 200 years:

 

300 Marcus Valerius M.f. Corvus V, Quintus Appuleius Pansa

299 Marcus Fulvius Cn.f. Paetinus, Titus Manlius T.f. Torquatus, Suffect: Marcus Valerius M.f. Corvus VI

298 Lucius Cornelius Cn.f. Scipio Barbatus, Gnaeus Fulvius Cn.f. Maximus Centumalus

297 Quintus Fabius Maximus Rullianus IV, Publius Decius P.f. Mus III

296 Appius Claudius C.f. Caecus II, Lucius Volumnius C.f. Flamma Violens II.

 

295 Quintus Fabius Maximus Rullianus V, Publius Decius P.f. Mus IV

294 Lucius Postumius L.f. Megellus II, who was recalled. Marcus Atilius M.f. Regulus

293 Lucius Papirius L.f. Cursor, Spurius Carvilius C.f. Maximus

292 Quintus Fabius Q.f. Maximus Gurges, Decimus Iunius D.f. Brutus Scaeva

291 Lucius Postumius L.f. Megellus III, Gaius Iunius C.f. Bubulcus Brutus

 

290 Manius Curius Dentatus I, Publius Cornelius Cn.f. Rufinus

289 Marcus Valerius M.f. Maximus Corvinus II, Quintus Caedicius Q.f. Noctua

288 Quintus Marcius Q.f. Tremulus II, Publius Cornelius A.f. Arvina II

287 Marcus Claudius M.f. Marcellus, Gaius Nautius Rutilus

286 Marcus Valerius Maximus (Potitus?), Gaius Aelius Paetus

 

285 Gaius Claudius M.f. Canina, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus

284 Gaius Servilius Tucca, Lucius Caecilius (Caelius) Metellus Denter, Suffect: Manius Curius Dentatus

283 Publius Cornelius Dolabella, Gnaeus Domitius Cn.f. Calvinus Maximus

282 Gaius Fabricius Luscinus, Quintus Aemilius Cn.f. Papus

281 Lucius Aemilius Q.f. Barbula, Quintus Marcius Q.f. Philippus

 

280 Publius Valerius Laevinus, Tiberius Coruncanius

279 Publius Sulpicius P.f. Saverrio, Publius Decius P.f. Mus

278 Gaius Fabricius Luscinus II, Quintus Aemilius Cn.f. Papus II

277 Publius Cornelius Cn.f. Rufinus II, Gaius Iunius C.f. Bubulcus Brutus I

276 Quintus Fabius Q.f. Maximus Gurges II, Gaius Genucius L.f. Clepsina

 

275 Manius Curius Dentatus II, Lucius Cornelius Ti.f Lentulus

274 Manius Curius Dentatus III, Servius Cornelius P.f. Merenda

273 Gaius Fabius M.f. Dorso Licinus, Gaius Claudius M.f. Canina II

272 Lucius Papirius L.f. Cursor II, Spurius Carvilius C.f. Maximus II

271 Gaius (or Kaeso) Quinctius L.f. Claudus, Lucius Genucius L.f. Clepsina

 

270 Gaius Genucius L.f. Clepsina II, Gnaeus Cornelius P.f. Blasio

269 Quintus Ogulnius L.f. Gallus, Gaius Fabius C.f. Pictor

268 Publius Sempronius P.f. Sophus, Appius Claudius Ap.f. Russus

267 Marcus Atilius Regulus, Lucius Iulius L.f. Libo

266 Decimus Iunius D.f. Pera, Numerius Fabius C.f. Pictor

 

265 Quintus Fabius Q.f. Maximus Gurges III, Lucius Mamilius Q.f. Vitulus

264 Appius Claudius C.f. Caudex, Marcus Fulvius Q.f. Flaccus

263 M' Otacilius C.f. Crassus, M' Valerius M.f. Maximus (Messalla)

262 Lucius Postumius (Albinus) L.f. Megellus, Quintus Mamilius Q.f. Vitulus

261 Lucius Valerius M.f. Flaccus, Tiberius Otacilius C.f. Crassus

 

260 Gnaeus Cornelius Scipio Asina, Gaius Duilius

259 Lucius Cornelius Scipio, Caius Aquillius M.f. Florus

258 Aulus Atilius A.f. Calatinus, Gaius Sulpicius Q.f. Paterculus

257 Gaius Atilius M.f. Regulus, Gnaeus Cornelius P.f. Blasio II

256 Lucius Manlius A.f. Vulso Longus I, Quintus Caedicius Q.f. Suffect: Marcus Atilius Regulus II

 

255 Marcus Aemilius M.f. Paullus, Servius Fulvius M.f. Paetinus Nobilior

254 Gnaeus Cornelius Scipio Asina II, Aulus Atilius A.f. Calatinus II

253 Gnaeus Servilius Cn.f. Caepio, Gaius Sempronius Ti.f. Blaesus

252 Gaius Aurelius L.f. Cotta, Publius Servilius Q.f. Geminus

251 Lucius Caecilius L.f. Metellus I, Gaius Furius Pacilus

 

250 Gaius Atilius M.f. Regulus II, Lucius Manlius A.f. Vulso Longus II

249 Publius Claudius Pulcher, Lucius Iunius C.f. Pullus

248 Gaius Aurelius L.f. Cotta II, Publius Servilius Q.f. Geminus II

247 Lucius Caecilius L.f. Metellus II, Numerius (Marcus) Fabius M.f. Buteo

246 Manius Otacilius C.f. Crassus II, Marcus Fabius C.f. Licinus

 

245 Marcus Fabius M.f. Buteo, Gaius Atilius A.f. Bulbus

244 Aulus Manlius T.f. Torquatus Atticus I, Gaius Sempronius Ti.f. Blaesus II

243 Gaius Fundanius C.f. Fundulus, Gaius Sulpicius C.f. Galus

242 Gaius Lutatius C.f. Catulus, Aulus Postumius A.f. Albinus

241 Aulus Manlius Titus f. Torquatus Atticus II, Quintus Lutatius Catulus f. Cerco

 

240 Gaius Claudius Ap.f. C.n. Centho, Marcus Sempronius C.f. Tuditanus

239 Gaius Mamilius Q.f. Turrinus, Quintus Valerius Q.f. Falto

238 Tiberius Sempronius Ti.f. Gracchus, Pub. Valerius Q.f. Falto

237 Lucius Cornelius L.f. Lentulus Caudinus, Quintus Fulvius M.f. Flaccus

236 Publius Cornelius L.f. Lentulus Caudinus, Gaius Licinius P.f. Varus

 

235 Titus Manlius T.f. Torquatus I, Gaius Atilius A.f. Bulbus II

234 Lucius Postumius A.f. Albinus, Spurius Carvilius Sp.f. Maximus Ruga

233 Quintus Fabius Q.f. Maximus Verrucosus I, M' Pomponius M.f. Matho

232 Marcus Aemilius M.f. Lepidus, Marcus Publicius L.f. Malleolus

231 Marcus Pomponius M'.f. Matho, Gaius Papirius C.f. Maso

 

230 Marcus Aemilius L.f. Barbula, Marcus Iunius D.f. Pera

229 Lucius Postumius A.f. Albinus II, Gnaeus Fulvius Cn.f. Centumalus,

228 Spurius Carvilius Sp.f. Maximus Ruga II, Quintus Fabius Q.f. Maximus Verrucosus II

227 Publius Valerius L.f. Flaccus, Marcus Atilius M.f. Regulus

226 Marcus Valerius M'.f. Maximus Messala, Lucius Apustius L.f. Fullo

 

225 Lucius Aemilius Q.f. Papus, Gaius Atilius M.f. Regulus

224 Titus Manlius T.f. Torquatus II, Quintus Fulvius M.f. Flaccus II

223 Gaius Flaminius C.f., Publius Furius Sp.f. Philus

222 Gnaeus Cornelius Scipio Calvus, Marcus Claudius M.f. Marcellus I

221 Publius Cornelius Cn.f. Scipio Asina, Marcus Minucius C.f. Rufus, Suffect: Marcus Aemilius M.f. Lepidus II

 

220 Lucius Veturius L.f. Philo, Gaius Lutatius Catulus

219 Lucius Aemilius M.f. Paulus, Marcus Livius M.f. Salinator

218 Publius Cornelius L.f. Scipio, Tiberius Sempronius C.f. Longus

217 Gaius Servilius P.f. Geminus, Gaius Flaminius C.f. II. Suffect: Marcus Atilius M.f. Regulus II

216 Lucius Aemilius Paullus II, Gaius Terentius C.f. Varro

 

215 Tiberius Sempronius Ti.f. Gracchus, Lucius Postumius A.f. Albinus III. Suffect: Marcus Claudius M.f. Marcellus II abd., Quintus Fabius Q.f. Maximus Verrucosus III

214 Quintus Fabius Q.f. Maximus Verrucosus IV, Marcus Claudius M.f. Marcellus III

213 Quintus Fabius Q.f. Maximus, Tiberius Sempronius Ti.f. Gracchus II

212 Appius Claudius P.f. Pulcher, Quintus Fulvius M.f. Flaccus III

211 Publius Sulpicius Ser.f. Galba Maximus I, Gnaeus Fulvius Cn.f. Centumalus Maximus

 

210 Marcus Valerius P.f. Laevinus II, Marcus Claudius M.f. Marcellus IV

209 Quintus Fabius Q.f. Maximus Verrucosus V, Quintus Fulvius M.f. Flaccus IV

208 Marcus Claudius M.f. Marcellus V, Titus Quinctius L.f. Crispinus

207 Gaius Claudius Ti.f. Nero, Marcus Livius M.f. Salinator II

206 Quintus Caecilius L.f. Metellus, Lucius Veturius L.f. Philo

 

205 Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus, Publius Licinius P.f. Crassus Dives

204 Marcus Cornelius M.f. Cethegus, Publius Sempronius C.f. Tuditanus

203 Gnaeus Servilius Cn.f. Caepio, Gaius Servilius C.f. Geminus

202 Tiberius Claudius P.f. Nero, Marcus Servilius C.f. Pulex Geminus

201 Gnaeus Cornelius L.f. Lentulus, Publius Aelius Q.f. Paetus

 

200 Publius Sulpicius Ser.f. Galba Maximus II, Gaius Aurelius C.f. Cotta

199 Lucius Cornelius L.f. Lentulus, Publius Villius Ti.f. Tappulus

198 Titus Quinctius T.f. Flamininus, Sextus Aelius Q.f. Paetus Catus

197 Gaius Cornelius L.f. Cethegus, Quintus Minucius C.f. Rufus

196 Lucius Furius Sp.f. Purpureo, Marcus Claudius M.f. Marcellus

 

195 Marcus Porcius M.f. Cato, Lucius Valerius P.f. Flaccus

194 Publius Cornelius P.f. Scipio Africanus II, |Tiberius Sempronius Ti.f. Longus

193 Lucius Cornelius L.f. Merula, Aulus Minucius Q.f. Thermus

192 Lucius Quinctius T.f. Flamininus, Gnaeus Domitius L.f. Ahenobarbus

191 Manius Acilius C.f. Glabrio, Publius Cornelius Cn.f. Scipio Nasica

 

190 Lucius Cornelius P.f. Scipio Asiaticus, Gaius Laelius C.f

189 Gnaeus Manlius Cn.f. Vulso, Marcus Fulvius M.f. Nobilior

188 Gaius Livius M.f. Salinator, Marcus Valerius M.f. Messalla

187 Marcus Aemilius M.f. Lepidus I, Gaius Flaminius C.f.

186 Spurius Postumius L.f. Albinus, Quintus Marcius L.f. Philippus I

 

185 Appius Claudius Ap.f. Pulcher, Marcus Sempronius M.f. Tuditanus

184 Publius Claudius Ap.f. Pulcher, Lucius Porcius L.f. Licinus

183 Quintus Fabius Q.f. Labeo, Marcus Claudius M.f. Marcellus

182 Lucius Aemilius L.f. Paullus, Gnaeus Baebius Q.f. Tamphilus

181 Publius Cornelius Cethegus, Marcus Baebius Q.f. Tamphilus

 

180 Aulus Postumius A.f. Albinus (Luscus), Gaius Calpurnius C.f. Piso. Suffect: Quintus Fulvius Cn.f. Flaccus

179 Lucius Manlius L.f. Acidinus Fulvianus, Quintus Fulvius Q.f. Flaccus

178 Marcus Iunius M.f. Brutus, Aulus Manlius Cn.f. Vulso

177 Gaius Claudius Ap.f. Pulcher, Tiberius Sempronius P.f. Gracchus

176 Gnaeus Cornelius Cn.f. Scipio Hispallus, Quintus Petillius. Suffect: Gaius Valerius M.f. Laevinus

 

175 Publius Mucius Q.f. Scaevola, Marcus Aemilius M.f. Lepidus II

174 Spurius Postumius A.f. Albinus Paullulus, Quintus Mucius Q.f. Scaevola

173 Lucius Postumius A.f. Albinus, Marcus Popillius P.f. Laenas

172 Gaius Popillius P.f. Laenas I, Publius Aelius P.f. Ligus

171 Publius Licinius C.f. Crassus, Gaius Cassius C.f. Longinus.

 

170 Aulus Hostilius L.f. Mancinus, Aulus Atilius C.f. Serranus

169 Quintus Marcius L.f. Philippus II, Gnaeus Servilius Cn.f. Caepio

168 Lucius Aemilius L.f. Paullus II, Gaius Licinius C.f. Crassus

167 Quintus Aelius Paetus, Marcus Junius Pennus

166 Gaius Sulpicius Galba, Marcus Claudius Marcellus I

 

165 Tiberius Manlius Torquatus, Gnaeus Octavius

164 Aulus Manlius Torquatus, Quintus Cassius Longinus

163 Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus II, Marcus Juventius Thalna

162 Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica Corculum I, Gaius Marcius Figulus I, Suffect: Publius Cornelius Lentulus, Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus

161 Marcus Valerius Messalla, Gaius Fannius Strabo

 

160 Marcus Cornelius Cethegus, Lucius Anicius Gallus

159 Gnaeus Cornelius Dolabella, Marcus Fulvius Nobilior

158 Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, Gaius Popillius P.f. Laenas II

157 Servius Julius Caesar, Lucius Aurelius Orestes

156 Lucius Cornelius Lentulus Lupus, Gaius Marcius Figulus II

 

155 Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica Corculum II, Marcus Claudius Marcellus II

154 Lucius Postumius Albinus, Quintus Opimius

153 Tiberius Annius Luscus, Quintus Fulvius Nobilior

152 Lucius Valerius Flaccus, Marcus Claudius Marcellus III

151 Aulus Postumius Albinus, Lucius Licinius Lucullus

 

150 Tiberius Quinctius Flaminius, M' Acilius Balbus

149 Manius Manilius, Marcius Censorinus

148 Spurius Postumius Albinus Magnus, Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus

147 Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus Africanus I, Gaius Livius Drusus

146 Gnaeus Cornelius Lentulus, Lucius Mummius Achaicus

 

145 Quintus Fabius Maximus Aemilianus, Lucius Hostilius Mancinus

144 Servius Sulpicius Ser.f. Galba, Lucius Aurelius Cotta

143 Appius Claudius Pulcher, Quintus Caecilius Metellus Macedonicus

142 Quintus Fabius Maximus Servilianus, Lucius Caecilius Metellus Calvus

141 Gnaeus Servilius Caepio, Quintus Pompeius

 

140 Quintus Servilius Caepio, Gaius Laelius Sapiens

139 Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, Marcus Popillius Laenas

138 Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica Serapio, Decimus Junius Brutus Callaicus

137 Marcus Aemilius Lepidus Porcina, Gaius Hostilius Mancinus

136 Lucius Furius Philus, Sextus Atilius Serranus

 

135 Quintus Calpurnius Piso, Servius Fulvius Flaccus

134 Gaius Fulvius Flaccus, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Aemilianus II

133 Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi, Publius Mucius Scaevola

132 Publius Popillius Laenas, Publius Rupilius

131 Lucius Valerius Flaccus, Publius Licinius Crassus Dives Mucianus

 

130 Lucius Cornelius Lentulus, Marcus Perperna Suffect: Appius Claudius Nero

129 Gaius Sempronius Tuditanus, Manius Aquillius

128 Titus Annius Rufus, Gnaeus Octavius

127 Lucius Cornelius Cinna, Lucius Cassius Longinus Ravilla

126 Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, Lucius Aurelius Orestes

 

125 Marcus Fulvius M.f. Flaccus, Marcus Plautius Hypsaeus

124 Gaius Cassius Longinus, Gaius Sextius Calvinus

123 Titus Quinctius Flaminius, Quintus Caecilius Metellus Balearicus

122 Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus, Gaius Fannius

121 Quintus Fabius Maximus Allobrogicus, Lucius Opimius

 

120 Gaius Papirius Carbo, Publius Manilius

119 Lucius Aurelius Cotta, Lucius Caecilius Metellus Delmaticus

118 Quintus Marcius Rex, Marcus Porcius Cato

117 Lucius Caecilius Metellus Diadematus, Quintus Mucius Scaevola

116 Quintus Fabius Maximus Eburnus, Gaius Licinius Geta

 

 

115 Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, Marcus Caecilius Metellus

114 Manius Acilius Balbus, Gaius Porcius Cato

113 Gnaeus Papirius Carbo, Gaius Caecilius Metellus Caprarius

112 Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, Marcus Livius Drusus

111 Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica Serapio, Lucius Calpurnius Bestia

 

110 Spurius Postumius Albinus, Marcus Minucius Rufus

109 Quintus Caecilius Metellus Numidicus, Marcus Junius Silanus

108 Servius Sulpicius Galba, Lucius Hortensius Suffect: Marcus Aurelius Scaurus

107 Lucius Cassius Longinus, Gaius Marius I

106 Quintus Servilius Caepio, Gaius Atilius Serranus

 

105 Gnaeus Mallius Maximus, Publius Rutilius Rufus

104 Gaius Flavius Fimbria, Gaius Marius II

103 Lucius Aurelius Orestes, Gaius Marius III

102 Quintus Lutatius Catulus, Gaius Marius IIII

101 Manius Aquillius, Gaius Marius V

 

 

 

It is enough to add some other nobile patrician and plebian famillies to those i posted earlier, such like: Valerii, Caecillii, Calpurnii, Livii, Mucii, Marcii, Licinii, Aurelii, Domitii etc

 

and few homines novi who were joining nobilitas like Pompeii or Porcii,

 

 

When I said 99 etc' I wanted to show the un-democratic nature of the Roman republic just before Caesar's day , that is the point .

Now numbers - since 200 BCE (not 59 or 91 or 133 or 167) there were 313 consulships (including Sufecti) .

Fasti is for Consuls , not Quastors and surly not T.P.

253 of these Consulships were held by 30 families (Gens) that is 81 % . More important is that 287 of the 313 were held by 44 families , that is 91.7 %

 

So , those numbers have any influence on my (and many) argument ?

It was a pure oligarchy , the poeple had no shrare in the government .

 

 

Aye, magistrates were elected by centurial assembly where in fact 2 first richest classes had decisive votes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Now numbers - since 200 BCE (not 59 or 91 or 133 or 167) there were 313 consulships (including Sufecti) .

Fasti is for Consuls , not Quastors and surly not T.P.

253 of these Consulships were held by 30 families (Gens) that is 81 % . More important is that 287 of the 313 were held by 44 families , that is 91.7 %

 

I'm going to open a new thread on this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Map of the Roman Empire

×