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Gaius Valerius

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About Gaius Valerius

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    Miles

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    Male
  • Location
    Chicago, USA
  1. Gaius Valerius

    Guide to Ancient Rome

  2. Gaius Valerius

    Guide to Ancient Rome

    We will have five full days. My area of interest is the Late Republic and the early Empire. We do want to take some time to see the Vatican Museum. Churches, not so much. Thanks for your response.
  3. Gaius Valerius

    Guide to Ancient Rome

    Do not know if this is the right place to post this, but I and my wife are going to Rome in early May. Does anyone know of a good guide we can hire for an informed tour of anient Rome? Any history professors out there doing this sort of thing part time?
  4. Gaius Valerius

    Tiberius Graccus

    Thanks guys for your thoughts. This was what my research showed as well. Thanks again.
  5. Gaius Valerius

    Tiberius Graccus

    I got stumped in class today when a student asked about Ti Graccus. Some sources state that he was of patrician stock, but gained his power as Tribune of the Plebs. This of course implies that he was of plebian,not patrician stock as patricians could not run for tribune of the plebs. Looking at the various sources, I admit that I come away uncertain, especially after looking at the bio of of Ti Graccus the elder. My take is that yes, he was a highly connected member of the plebian class, and thus did have influence in the Senate. But I am having trouble tracing this down. Any thoughts?
  6. Gaius Valerius

    Death Of Octavian

    Thank you for your response and links. I believe that oftentimes various writers and/or media try to create a major mystery where there very well may be at best a minor one. For example, I remember a broadcast a few years ago about the death of Alexander the Great. The show focused its attention on the "mysterious and inexplicable death" of Alexander at age 32. A friend of mine who is a physician as well as an ancient history buff, commented that we have to remember that in that era, virtually anything that we treat today with readily available medications or what we now consider routine surgery was fatal. Appendicitis could have been fatal. Or, as he also noted, "being cut with a rusty sword could do someone in." With a technical life expectancy of about 27 to 30 years of age, (admittedly due to a very high infant mortality rate), living to almost 76 years of age, as did Octavian, was probably a major accomplishment. I also agree that it is far more likely that enemies of Tiberius and Livia were quick to circulate rumors. Even the sources admit that they are nothing more than rumors, and are not supported by any evidence.
  7. Gaius Valerius

    Death Of Octavian

    While watching the History International channel last night, it made a bold assertion, really a statement of fact, that Augustus was murdered by his wife, who fed him poison fruit. To my knowledge, although there may have been rumors to that effect, there is not one shred of evidence supporting this. Octavian was about 76 years old, I believe, at his death. A ripe old age in its time. I have friends who quote the History channel as if it is the absolute authority on just about anything, and I find this type of "scholarship" an irritation. Am I missing anything here?
  8. Gaius Valerius

    Spectacle in the Roman World

    I need a new book!
  9. Gaius Valerius

    Support for LSU

    Although I agree that Latin has little practical value to the average person, it is a very important part of the Western Heritage, and it should not be eliminated from any institution priding itself on first rate academics. Although I am am an infrequent poster on this Forum, the above statement has moved me to reply. I am a Professor in the College of Business at the University of Illinois at Chicago, going on some 30 years service. The University in experiencing severe financial hardships and, in its desire to shore up its situation is moving to eliminate the Classics Department over in the College of Liberal Arts. More so, due to a "hiring freeze", we do not have one faculty member in our vaunted History Department with a specialty in ancient history. I have for a long time bemoaned the lack of historical knowledge of my business students. "Plato? Sure, isn't that the fun doughy stuff we got to play with as kids? Aristotle? Oh yes, that's that Greek restaurant in "Greek Town." It seems more and more to me that higher education is becoming more of a glorified trade school than an institution that helps train the mind and spirit of our young adults. We are our heritage. To pretend that history plays no role in who we are, and perhaps more importantly, who and what we will become, is a fool's position. If the current trend continues, and I believe that it will, what it means to be "an educated person" will be in serious doubt. I could go on, but I have have taken enough of all of your time. To be honest, the business students at my University double major in Economics and whatever business major, leaving them not much room that they would consider a Classics class rather than taking some easy credit classes. The closest they'll get to classics is in PLSC 100 class. Hi Flavius...Looking at your profile. we seem to have a lot in common, and that is besides being from Chicago. I too am a graduate of Loyola Academy. Just a few years or so before you... . Always nice to meet a fellow alum. As to school, it is correct to say that the required curriculum in the business college leaves very little room for "free electives" which would in all likelihood be taken in business related courses. However, every University has what we call "gen ed" or general education requirements that all students must take in order to graduate, regardless of their college. Here is where I believe we could really do some good and broaden the background of our up and coming business students. I would very much enjoy continuing this discussion with you. What school are you at, if you want to say? I am at Loyola University, I am majoring in Latin and Political Science. That's an excellent combination. I wish you great success going forward.
  10. Gaius Valerius

    Support for LSU

    Although I agree that Latin has little practical value to the average person, it is a very important part of the Western Heritage, and it should not be eliminated from any institution priding itself on first rate academics. Although I am am an infrequent poster on this Forum, the above statement has moved me to reply. I am a Professor in the College of Business at the University of Illinois at Chicago, going on some 30 years service. The University in experiencing severe financial hardships and, in its desire to shore up its situation is moving to eliminate the Classics Department over in the College of Liberal Arts. More so, due to a "hiring freeze", we do not have one faculty member in our vaunted History Department with a specialty in ancient history. I have for a long time bemoaned the lack of historical knowledge of my business students. "Plato? Sure, isn't that the fun doughy stuff we got to play with as kids? Aristotle? Oh yes, that's that Greek restaurant in "Greek Town." It seems more and more to me that higher education is becoming more of a glorified trade school than an institution that helps train the mind and spirit of our young adults. We are our heritage. To pretend that history plays no role in who we are, and perhaps more importantly, who and what we will become, is a fool's position. If the current trend continues, and I believe that it will, what it means to be "an educated person" will be in serious doubt. I could go on, but I have have taken enough of all of your time. To be honest, the business students at my University double major in Economics and whatever business major, leaving them not much room that they would consider a Classics class rather than taking some easy credit classes. The closest they'll get to classics is in PLSC 100 class. Hi Flavius...Looking at your profile. we seem to have a lot in common, and that is besides being from Chicago. I too am a graduate of Loyola Academy. Just a few years or so before you... . Always nice to meet a fellow alum. As to school, it is correct to say that the required curriculum in the business college leaves very little room for "free electives" which would in all likelihood be taken in business related courses. However, every University has what we call "gen ed" or general education requirements that all students must take in order to graduate, regardless of their college. Here is where I believe we could really do some good and broaden the background of our up and coming business students. I would very much enjoy continuing this discussion with you. What school are you at, if you want to say?
  11. Gaius Valerius

    Support for LSU

    Although I agree that Latin has little practical value to the average person, it is a very important part of the Western Heritage, and it should not be eliminated from any institution priding itself on first rate academics. Although I am am an infrequent poster on this Forum, the above statement has moved me to reply. I am a Professor in the College of Business at the University of Illinois at Chicago, going on some 30 years service. The University in experiencing severe financial hardships and, in its desire to shore up its situation is moving to eliminate the Classics Department over in the College of Liberal Arts. More so, due to a "hiring freeze", we do not have one faculty member in our vaunted History Department with a specialty in ancient history. I have for a long time bemoaned the lack of historical knowledge of my business students. "Plato? Sure, isn't that the fun doughy stuff we got to play with as kids? Aristotle? Oh yes, that's that Greek restaurant in "Greek Town." It seems more and more to me that higher education is becoming more of a glorified trade school than an institution that helps train the mind and spirit of our young adults. We are our heritage. To pretend that history plays no role in who we are, and perhaps more importantly, who and what we will become, is a fool's position. If the current trend continues, and I believe that it will, what it means to be "an educated person" will be in serious doubt. I could go on, but I have have taken enough of all of your time.
  12. Gaius Valerius

    Ides of March

    Hi all: As a new member to this group, I first want to say how much I have enjoyed reading many of the very informative posts of the members over the past several weeks. So now I will take the plunge. A question that I have been asking for years regarding the assassination of Caesar is simply this. How could someone as so clearly politically astute as Caesar, for lack of a better way of saying it, "not seen this thing coming?" Although he did publicly turn down M. Antonius' offer of the crown so to speak, he seems to have often dressed the part of a king, (that three letter word that gentlemen in Rome did not use in public) and displayed an attitude of kingship. How could he not have foreseen the reaction of the liberatores to his actions and seen the conspiracy coming and prevented it? Was it just arrogance? Foolishness? A combination of both? I appreciate everyone's thoughts.
  13. Gaius Valerius

    Your Hidden Roman Name

    Thank you for your welcome. Try this: nroeeowrggeoe Male
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