Jump to content
UNRV Ancient Roman Empire Forums

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Trade'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Auditorium
    • Renuntiatio et Consilium Comitiorum
  • Historia Romanorum
    • Imperium Romanorum
    • Templum Romae - Temple of Rome
    • Gloria Exercitus - 'Glory of the Army'
    • Romana Humanitas
    • Colosseum
    • Archaeological News: Rome
    • Academia
  • World History, Cultures and Archaeology
    • Historia in Universum
    • Archaeological News: The World
    • Archaeology
    • Vacatio
  • Et Cetera
    • Hora Postilla Thermae
    • Trajan's Market

Categories

  • Main
  • Academia
  • Book Review
  • Culture
  • Decline of Empire
  • Early Empire
  • Economy
  • Emperors
  • Empire
  • Fall Republic
  • Five Good Emperors
  • Glossary
  • Government
  • Hotels
  • Military
  • Museum
  • Provinces
  • Roman Events
  • Roman Republic
  • Tacitus
  • Travel
  • Interview

Blogs

  • Blah-ger
  • WotWotius's Blog
  • Lost_Warrior's Blog
  • The Rostra
  • Moonlapse's Private Blog
  • Conation of Spurius
  • Lacertus' Blog
  • Hamilcar Barca's Blog
  • Vitalstatistix
  • The musings of a UNRV admin
  • Court of the Emperor
  • Phalangist Propoganda
  • Viggen's Blog
  • longbow's Blog
  • Silentium est aureum
  • Zeke's Blog
  • Onasander's Blog
  • Favonius Cornelius' Blog
  • Tobias' Blog
  • Ekballo Suus
  • The Triclinium
  • Judicii Sexti Roscii.
  • M. Porcius Cato's Blog
  • Rostrum Clodii
  • Killing Time at College
  • Cotidiana Res Meo Vitae
  • Honorius' Blog
  • Nephele's Gothic Anagrams
  • Diurnal Journal - On Occasion
  • The Language of Love
  • caldrail's Blog
  • Court of Antiochus
  • Casa di Livia
  • Northern Neil's guide to a level playing field
  • anima vagula blandula
  • Flavian Ampitheater of the Written Word
  • Divi Filius' Blog
  • GPM's blog
  • miguel's blog
  • VTC's Blog
  • G-Manicus' Blog
  • Klingan's Blog
  • cornelius_sulla's Blog
  • Ancient Writings
  • Aurelia's Insula
  • Centurion-Macro's Legionary barracks
  • dianamt54's Blog
  • Ghost Writer
  • GhostOfClayton's Blog
  • Viggen's Blog
  • The Contrarian
  • WotWotius' Blog
  • sonic's Blog
  • Medusa's Blog
  • Virgil61's Blog

Calendars

  • Calendar of Hisorical Roman Events
  • Events (UK and Europe)
  • Events (The Americas)

Categories

  • Free Classic Works in PDF
  • Historic Novels
  • Scientific Papers
  • Ancient Warfare Magazin

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 2 results

  1. Hi everyone! I have a Latin-related question that has been buggering me for a long time now, maybe some of you could help me out? (And yes, I have tried google many MANY times, but haven't come up with an answer yet.. :-/ ) This is the question; How did Latin spread through trade? I know many traders learned the language by selling their wares to the roman military, but I’m guessing there were a lot more possibilities for traders to learn Latin. Also, how did the language spread from those traders to other non-latin speaking communities? Could you help me out please? (Or help me find some usefull links?) Thanks!
  2. On Monday, the government of Malta announced that an international team of researchers has discovered the wreck of a 2,700-year-old Phoenician trading ship and its cargo off the island country’s coastline. The ancient shipwreck may be the oldest ever found in the Mediterranean Sea. The discovery was made several months ago one mile off the coast of Gozo Island, the second-largest island in the Maltese archipelago. Nearly 400 feet below the surface of the Mediterranean Sea, researchers located a 50-foot-long sunken ship and its cargo strewn over a 700-square-foot area. The remains included 20 lava grinding stones weighing nearly 80 pounds each and 50 amphorae—large ceramic jugs with two handles and narrow necks used to hold wine. Since the Mediterranean’s sandy seabed cushioned the impact of the wreck, the relics were well preserved and could be dated to 700 B.C., which could make the discovery the oldest shipwreck in the Mediterranean. The ancient Phoenician ship was typical of the trading vessels that stopped in Malta to sell cargo, and since researchers discovered seven different types of amphorae in the wreck, they surmised that the ship had made numerous ports of call. It is believed that the vessel was sailing between Sicily and Malta when it met its watery demise. More at History
×