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Viggen

Triumviri
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Everything posted by Viggen

  1. Mark Tedesco’s I am John, I am Paul gives life to a story about which little is known: who were the men to whom the Basilica of John and Paul are dedicated? The story is told as a memoir from John’s point of view, as the story of his life in the legions, how he came to his relationship with Paul, and how they came to practice Christianity. The style is conversational and straightforward, with notations about the Latin meanings as needed. These notations alternate between footnotes and parenthetical asides, the latter tending to draw the reader out of the story, but they are useful for one not versed in Roman history... ...continue with the review of I am John I am Paul A Story of Two Soldiers in Ancient Rome by Marc Tedesco
  2. Mark Tedesco’s I am John, I am Paul gives life to a story about which little is known: who were the men to whom the Basilica of John and Paul are dedicated? The story is told as a memoir from John’s point of view, as the story of his life in the legions, how he came to his relationship with Paul, and how they came to practice Christianity. The style is conversational and straightforward, with notations about the Latin meanings as needed. These notations alternate between footnotes and parenthetical asides, the latter tending to draw the reader out of the story, but they are useful for one not versed in Roman history... ...continue with the review of I am John I am Paul A Story of Two Soldiers in Ancient Rome by Marc Tedesco
  3. Viggen

    Sculpted Bas-reliefs

    ...looks realy beautiful!
  4. Scientists have cracked the secret to Roman water-based structures’ strength – and findings could help today’s builders via Guardian
  5. Viggen

    Review Of The Venus Throw

    ...this review has now been updated to the new layout!
  6. Viggen

    Sculpted Bas-reliefs

    hi selixis and welcome to UNRV, that looks fantastic do you have a facebook account? happy to share those pics on our facebook page cheers p.s. maybe you meant shipping in the EU? Majority of readers here are from the USA and UK
  7. Okay, so maybe I’m not the best person to be reviewing this book. It’s written for young readers, which is a group that I’m definitely not a member of. I’m much closer to life’s second round of diapering than to its first! But tough titties, as we used to say when I was a member of that age cohort. I read it, I enjoyed it, and now I’m gonna review it! And anyway, as my wife likes to point out, I’ve got a lot of twelve-year old in me! This book reminded me of the adventures contained in the pages of the Scholastic Book Club books that I devoured as a wee lad. Of course, I don’t really remember any of those books. But it was the feeling! And this book has all of those elements – smart, brave young protagonists, exotic locales, appropriately sanitized villains, and, most of all, adventure! Oh – and crocodiles... ...continue to the review of Crocodile Legion - A Roman Adventure by SJA Turney
  8. Book Review by Alex Johnston Okay, so maybe I’m not the best person to be reviewing this book. It’s written for young readers, which is a group that I’m definitely not a member of. I’m much closer to life’s second round of diapering than to its first! But tough titties, as we used to say when I was a member of that age cohort. I read it, I enjoyed it, and now I’m gonna review it! And anyway, as my wife likes to point out, I’ve got a lot of twelve-year old in me! This book reminded me of the adventures contained in the pages of the Scholastic Book Club books that I devoured as a wee lad. Of course, I don’t really remember any of those books. But it was the feeling! And this book has all of those elements – smart, brave young protagonists, exotic locales, appropriately sanitized villains, and, most of all, adventure! Oh – and crocodiles. Marcus and Callie, brother and sister, are orphans – their parents were lost at sea. But luckily for them, their uncle, a standard bearer for the 22nd legion, took them under his wing, and introduced them to his extended “family” – the century with which he served. The story begins in Alexandria, Egypt. Turbo, the prefect (governor) of Egypt needs money. Alexandria was suffering the ravages of war, and the treasury was empty. Turbo was intent on raising the necessary funds to restore the city to its previous glory and settled on the perfect fundraising solution – locate an as-of-yet-un-looted pyramid, and commence to looting it. Why doesn’t everybody think of that? Marcus, who wants nothing more than to join his uncle in the legion, is raring to go, frantically hoping to be invited along. And Callie, a brilliant young scholar, is more interested in ancient religions and hieroglyphics than in gold, and she too is excited to make the journey. But, as we all know, looting pyramids can be dangerous work! Who in their right mind wants a couple of kids tagging along? So, the usual reluctance is in evidence. But the soldiers trying to keep our heroes from joining the expedition are forgetting three important facts: 1. It’s a kid’s book, so the soldiers will inevitably fail in their attempts to make the kids stay home 2. It’s a kid’s book, so the soldiers will inevitably realize that Marcus and Callie are smarter than they are, and 3. It’s a kid’s book, so when it’s all said and done, they’ll all agree that it’s a good thing that Marcus and Callie came along, otherwise they would’ve never found the damned treasure! (Oops – did I give it away? Uh, that is, I mean, if they did end up finding the treasure they would agree that it was due to Marcus’ and Callie’s help. Hypothetically, speaking of course. In theory. Maybe, maybe not). Jeez, adults can be so dense sometimes! Why do you always have to explain the simplest things to them? Over and over again! There’s history to be learned in these pages, whatever the age group! Turney does a great job of portraying the devastation of Alexandria vis-à-vis the glories that the city previously manifested. In one section of the book, he describes a scene where the children are passing the crumbled ruins of the home where they used to live. Marcus was saddened, but Callie looked on with interest – she was always trying to gain knowledge from every situation she encountered. The author then moves directly to a description of the library of Alexandria and its destruction. Turney, the author of the Marius Mules series, brings his talent for character development to this book, but in a manner designed with the younger reader in mind. The children’s uncle was a standard bearer for his century, and the strenuous nature of that position, “lugging the heavy standard around,” is aptly portrayed. Prefect Turbo reminded Marcus of “one of the scraggy black vultures that they often saw circling in the clear blue Egyptian skies. … [He] sat hunched over his desk, his neck craned and his head snapping back and forth as he worked.” Senex, the oldest man in the unit, had been a priest trainee, but he could no longer read, because his eyes gave him woe. He only had a few teeth left, and had to gum his food. The only part of his portrayal that I didn’t like was where the author described him as nearer sixty than fifty, which sounds suspiciously like he’s saying that the half-blind, toothless old man was younger than me! Given my vibrancy, intelligence, and youthful good looks, this clearly couldn’t be the case, and I’m surprised that an author of Turney’s talent would make such an obvious mistake! So there! Wait – what was I just talking about? I forget. What’s that you say?!? Speak up, dag nab it! And bring me my walker, goddamn you, or I’ll beat you with my cane! Speaking of old farts, my favorite character was the ancient Egyptian that they forced to accompany the group from Alexandria. I wonder if you’ll feel the same. Remains to be seen, I guess. Anyway, give it a read, and if you’re a mature, dignified adult like me, just don’t tell anybody you read it and nobody will be the wiser. Better yet, buy it for your kids, and sneak it away while they’re sleeping. Just remember to put it back before they wake up! Man, writing book reviews is hard work! I need a drink. Bartender, bring me a hot chocolate, heavy on the marshmallows. Make it a double, and if you spill any on my jammies there’ll be hell to pay! PS – the illustrations are fantastic! ...more Book Reviews! Roman Empire And The Silk Road by Raoul McLoughlin Release Your Inner Roman by Jerry Toner Great Battles of the Classical Greek World by Owen Rees Simon Turney lives with his wife and children and a menagerie of animals in rural North Yorkshire, where he sits in an office, wired on coffee and digestive biscuits, and attempts to spin engrossing tales out of strands of imagination while his children drive toys across his desk and two dogs howl as they try to share a brain cell. A born and bred Yorkshireman with a love of country, history and architecture, Simon spends most of his rare free time travelling around ancient sites, writing, researching the ancient world and reading voraciously. Alex Johnston is the author of several fiction books about Marcus Mettius, a minor character in Julius Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War. Marcus brings a salesman's amused and worldly perspective to the major characters, locales, and events of the late Roman Republic period. I think he's a hoot, and I hope that you will as well! The Marcus Mettius titles are Caesar's Ambassador,Caesar's Emissary, Caesar's Daughter, a compilation of those three stories, and Caesar's Lictor. Marcus likes a good joke and prefers wits to weapons in dealing with tricky situations. He parties with Gauls and Alexandrians, hangs out with slaves and freedmen, and counts Julius Caesar among his friends. Tell us your opinion - Submit your Review - Buy the book! Book Review of Crocodile Legion: A Roman Adventure - Related Topic: Bibliography Get it now! Crocodile Legion for the UK ________________________________ Archive
  9. thanks @MarcusMettius for this wonderful review!
  10. Okay, so maybe I’m not the best person to be reviewing this book. It’s written for young readers, which is a group that I’m definitely not a member of. I’m much closer to life’s second round of diapering than to its first! But tough titties, as we used to say when I was a member of that age cohort. I read it, I enjoyed it, and now I’m gonna review it! And anyway, as my wife likes to point out, I’ve got a lot of twelve-year old in me! This book reminded me of the adventures contained in the pages of the Scholastic Book Club books that I devoured as a wee lad. Of course, I don’t really remember any of those books. But it was the feeling! And this book has all of those elements – smart, brave young protagonists, exotic locales, appropriately sanitized villains, and, most of all, adventure! Oh – and crocodiles... ...continue to the review of Crocodile Legion - A Roman Adventure by SJA Turney
  11. Viggen

    Digital Atlas of Roman Empire

    cool, if you want to keep us up to date on your work, maybe open up a very own thread in http://www.unrv.com/forum/forum/73-scriptores-author-lounge/ cheers
  12. Viggen

    Digital Atlas of Roman Empire

    awesome! any of your titles you want to share with us?
  13. Viggen

    Life and times of Flavius Arbogast

    in the german wiki entry it says that he was the son of Baudogast (according to John of Antioch) and they lived east of the Rhine at the non occopied part of Germania, nothing about Galatia... ...also something that doesnt come across as clear in english is that in german the fact that he was non christian, but had excellent contact with Ambrosius and other high ranking christians. He also benefited that at the time high ranking romans like Symmachus und Nicomachus Flavianus where non christians themselves, and that Eugenius even though christian was very tolerant towards pagans... https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arbogast_der_Ältere
  14. Viggen

    Life and times of Flavius Arbogast

    ...not much on Arbogastes but interesting as it fits your time period... I recently stumbled upon this pdf http://arizona.openrepository.com/arizona/bitstream/10150/317966/1/AZU_TD_BOX44_E9791_1966_383.pdf ...of course @sonic written several books on this time period, so he should be able to add a word or two
  15. ...this review has now been updated to the new layout!
  16. Viggen

    Roman Medicine by Audrey Cruse

    ...this review has now been updated to the new layout!
  17. Viggen

    Roman Medicine by Audrey Cruse

    Roman Medicine, by Audrey Cruse This title is a recent publication(2004).It is a very well presented volume with a considerable range of quality illustrations.The whole presentation of this work is a constant reminder to modern scholars that one must always try to take a step back from any historical material ( and previous scholarly works) to avoid imposing the "modern" on the behaviour and goals of our various ancestors. Cruse is rigorous in attempting to step aside from judgements based on contemporary usage, this is most immediatley obvious in the references to healing plants, as materia medica plants can have a stratlingly wide range of uses for very different medical conditions though within historical eras they have a tendency to be fashionable for one predominant disease... ...read the full review of Roman Medicine by Audrey Cruse
  18. ...this review has now been updated to the new layout!
  19. Book Review by Philip Matyszak The Rise of the Seleukid Empire ISBN-10: 1783030534 ISBN-13: 978-1783030538 The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III ISBN-10: 178303050X ISBN-13: 978-1783030507 The Fall of the Seleukid Empire ISBN-10: 1783030305 ISBN-13: 978-1783030309 It is generally believed that the largest empire in antiquity was the Roman empire. However, this was actually smaller than the short-lived empire of Alexander the Great, which stretched from the shores of the Adriatic Sea to the foothills of the Himalayas. After the death of Alexander in 323 BC, his empire broke into several successor states, the largest of which was the Seleucid empire. Author and historian John D. Grainger tells the story of the Seleucid empire, and as is only fitting for an empire of this size, he tells it in not one but three books – The Rise of the Seleukid Empire, the Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III, and The Fall of the Seleukid Empire. Each of these books is some 250 pages long, and each can be read as a separate volume in its own right, though of course, doing so causes one to miss the entire grand sweep of the author's project. What the reader gets from the three books is a detailed knowledge of an empire all the more extraordinary for the fact that even some amateur historians do not know that it ever existed. Indeed, my own first experience of the Seleucid empire – and probably that of many non-historians – was in hearing strangely-named kings in bible readings from the Old Testament, for the Seleucid empire included Palestine and the rest of the Middle East. (Not an area which the average man in the street will think of as once having been ruled by Greeks.) The first book in the series shows how Seleucus managed to leverage himself from one of Alexander's lesser generals to ruler of the largest remnant of Alexander's kingdom. The author walks his readers carefully through the political quagmire of alliances, double-crosses, wars, mutinies and revolutions which followed Alexander's death – and in the process shows us what an extraordinarily unprincipled and ruthless bunch Alexander's generals actually were. We see how Seleucus started with Babylonia as his power base, and once he had gained his empire, the series of careful political and military steps he took to establish the empire's heartland in north Syria. At the end of the book, Seleucus was in the process of expanding his empire to include Macedonia. His abrupt assassination comes as something of a shock to the reader; a shock which diminishes as one reads on through the series and discovers that very few Seleucid kings died naturally – and in most of those cases it was disease which forestalled the assassin's knife. It is fitting that the second book is almost entirely dedicated to the career of Antiochus III, since the Seleucid empire started to unravel almost as soon as it founder died, and it was only the extraordinary energy and ability of Antiochus III that slowed this fragmentation. Only slowed it, because it was under Antiochus' watch that Asia Minor was lost to the empire - largely thanks to the power of Rome. Barely mentioned in the first book, Rome becomes ever more of a dominant force as the series goes by. The author makes a good argument that Rome was only briefly interested in the Seleucid empire, and that was in the years before the Magnesia campaign. In those years Antiochus was a threat to Rome's interests in Europe. Once Antiochus had been slapped back beyond the Taurus Mountains, Roman interest was at best peripheral, but such was Rome's power that it is nevertheless the defining political force in the third book. The third book is the hardest to read, because although by then Bactria had gone its own way, Iran and Babylonia were in Parthian hands and Asia Minor was an unruly set of feuding kingdoms, the situation in the remnant of the empire was chaotic enough to make lucid explanation challenging. 'Laodike, queen of the Samenians was replaced by Azizos the Arab chief. .. An alignment of Stratos with the Arabs and Antiochus X against Demetrios III and Philip I seems logical …'. This quote on p.178 sums up the problem with this text – there are too many Demetrii and Antiochi charging around, usually marrying people called Laodike or Kleopatra, and often both, either serially or together. Because there is not enough information in the sources to give any of these people a recognizable personality, after a while the names tend to blur together well before we reach Antiochus XIV. The author has made good use of his sources. Naturally for much of the time he is forced to rely on Appian, but his reading of this essential source is informed and critical and he does not hesitate to point out where other sources such as the Babylonian diaries, coin evidence (which he uses extremely well) or archaeology show that Appian was off the mark. ...more Book Reviews! Gods of Ancient Rome by R. Turcan The Oxford Classical Dictionary by Hornblower Remus : A Roman Myth by T. P. Wiseman Another reason why these books are much more than a mere re-telling of Appian (and this would still be a good series if that is all it was) is because the author gives an excellent analysis of the nature of the Seleucid kingdom and how it operated, why it was vulnerable, and how the very nature of the kingdom made it inevitable that the thing would fall apart in much the way that it did. If the book has a weakness it is that the author follows his ancient sources in focussing on the military campaigns (perhaps to be expected from a publisher called Pen & Sword). Nevertheless, the romance of a period rife with castles, elephants, dynastic feuds, royal incest and assassinations pirates and rebels of every sort is often lost in the dry minutiae of campaigns. The result is that a good read is sometimes lost to the demands of an excellent reference book. For this much is certain, at present these is no better set of books available to the general reader for the story of the Seleucid kingdom from beginning to end. Given that the nearest rivals are written in dense academic language and priced well out of the reach of the average amateur historian, the author and his publisher done readers a great service in bringing out this accessible and informative set of books. Tell us your opinion - Submit your Review - Buy the book! Book Review of The Rise and Fall of the Seleukid Empire - Related Topic: Roman Syria Bibliography Get it now! The Fall of the Seleukid Empire for the UK ________________________________ Archive
  20. great stuff, three books one review
  21. It’s hard to forget just how connected the world is nowadays. In ancient times, most people would be blissfully unaware of the entire world outside their local community. The average Chinese, for instance, would have never known that elsewhere on the globe, a glorious people called the Romans ruled over a massive empire. But the Chinese scholars were well aware of the Romans. .. via ZME Science
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