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Found 8 results

  1. Archaeologists in Greece have discovered a vast tomb that they believe is connected with the reign of the warrior-king Alexander the Great, who conquered vast areas of the ancient world between Greece and India. The tomb, dating to around 300 BC, and which may have held the body of one of Alexander’s generals or a member of his family, was found beneath a huge burial mound near the ancient site of Amphipolis in northern Greece. Antonis Samaras, Greece’s prime minister, visited the dig Tuesday and described the discovery as “clearly extremely significant.” Article continues here
  2. Interesting article (and book) about Plato, which sheds new light on his idea of love. Plato lent his name to Platonic love but a new book reveals that the ancient Greek philosopher never advocated love without sex. Dr Jay Kennedy: Image-Uni of Manchester University of Manchester science historian Dr Jay Kennedy, who hit the headlines last year after revealing he had cracked the code in the great thinker’s writings, has now published a decoder’s manual that lays bare the secret content of Plato’s ancient works. “Plato – the Einstein of Greece’s Golden Age – was long thought to favour love without sex, or ‘Platonic love’, but this new research reveals Plato was far from being a prude,” says Dr Kennedy, who is based in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, part of the University’s Faculty of Life Sciences. More at Heritage Daily
  3. That's a bizarre theory, but who knows? The idea that Native Americans are descended from ancient Jews, Egyptians, or Greeks has been a controversial one for hundreds of years. James Adair, an 18th century settler who traded with Native Americans for 40 years, wrote that their language, customs, and social structures were similar to those of the Israelites. He wrote in his book “The History of the American Indians”: “It is a very difficult thing to divest ourselves, not to say, other persons, of prejudices and favourite opinions, and I expect to be censured by some for opposing commonly received sentiments, or for meddling with a dispute agitated among the learned ever since the first discovery of America.” More here
  4. Haha, I like how the coin collector arrested for forgery and criminal possession of stolen property was forced to write an essay for the Numismatic Society magazine like a naughty school boy! The Manhattan district attorney handed over five ancient coins to Greek officials Monday, after authorities seized the antiquities from a collector. Arnold-Peter Weiss was arrested on Jan. 3, 2012, while trying to sell three other coins—which he thought were stolen from Sicily and worth millions of dollars—during a collector's show at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, prosecutors said. Article continues here.
  5. The culture and legends of ancient Greece have a remarkably long legacy in the modern language of education, politics, philosophy, art and science. Classical references from thousands of years ago continue to appear. But what was the origin of some of these ideas? Article continues on BBC News page.
  6. Aurelia

    10 Must See Ancient Greek Temples

    Interesting little list. By no means extensive, but a good start...
  7. It's eerie what military technology can do these days. But in ancient Greece, they thought they were cutting edge when they had developed the linothorax. What's a linothorax, you ask? Well, lino refers to linen and thorax means the chest... To continue reading about linothorax and to watch a cool demonstration video click here!
  8. Racy inscriptions and phalluses carved into Astypalaia's rocky peninsula shed light on very private lives of ancient Greece Wild, windswept, rocky and remote, Astypalaia is not an obvious place for the unearthing of some of the world's earliest erotic graffiti. Certainly, Dr Andreas Vlachopoulos, a specialist in prehistoric archaeology, didn't think so when he began fieldwork on the Aegean island four years ago. Until he chanced upon a couple of racy inscriptions and large phalluses carved into Astypalaia's rocky peninsula at Vathy. The inscriptions, both dating to the fifth and sixth centuries BC, were "so monumental in scale" – and so tantalisingly clear – he was left in no doubt of the motivation behind the artworks. The Guardian article continues here. P.S. For chuckles, check out the comments section.
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