Jump to content
UNRV Ancient Roman Empire Forums

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Archaeology'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Auditorium
    • Renuntiatio et Consilium Comitiorum
  • Historia Romanorum
    • Imperium Romanorum
    • Templum Romae - Temple of Rome
    • Gloria Exercitus - 'Glory of the Army'
    • Romana Humanitas
    • Colosseum
    • Archaeological News: Rome
    • Academia
  • World History, Cultures and Archaeology
    • Historia in Universum
    • Archaeological News: The World
    • Archaeology
    • Vacatio
  • Et Cetera
    • Hora Postilla Thermae
    • Trajan's Market

Categories

  • Main
  • Academia
  • Book Review
  • Culture
  • Decline of Empire
  • Early Empire
  • Economy
  • Emperors
  • Empire
  • Fall Republic
  • Five Good Emperors
  • Glossary
  • Government
  • Hotels
  • Military
  • Museum
  • Provinces
  • Roman Events
  • Roman Republic
  • Tacitus
  • Travel
  • Interview

Blogs

  • Blah-ger
  • WotWotius's Blog
  • Lost_Warrior's Blog
  • The Rostra
  • Moonlapse's Private Blog
  • Conation of Spurius
  • Lacertus' Blog
  • Hamilcar Barca's Blog
  • Vitalstatistix
  • The musings of a UNRV admin
  • Court of the Emperor
  • Phalangist Propoganda
  • Viggen's Blog
  • longbow's Blog
  • Silentium est aureum
  • Zeke's Blog
  • Onasander's Blog
  • Favonius Cornelius' Blog
  • Tobias' Blog
  • Ekballo Suus
  • The Triclinium
  • Judicii Sexti Roscii.
  • M. Porcius Cato's Blog
  • Rostrum Clodii
  • Killing Time at College
  • Cotidiana Res Meo Vitae
  • Honorius' Blog
  • Nephele's Gothic Anagrams
  • Diurnal Journal - On Occasion
  • The Language of Love
  • caldrail's Blog
  • Court of Antiochus
  • Casa di Livia
  • Northern Neil's guide to a level playing field
  • anima vagula blandula
  • Flavian Ampitheater of the Written Word
  • Divi Filius' Blog
  • GPM's blog
  • miguel's blog
  • VTC's Blog
  • G-Manicus' Blog
  • Klingan's Blog
  • cornelius_sulla's Blog
  • Ancient Writings
  • Aurelia's Insula
  • Centurion-Macro's Legionary barracks
  • dianamt54's Blog
  • Ghost Writer
  • GhostOfClayton's Blog
  • Viggen's Blog
  • The Contrarian
  • WotWotius' Blog
  • sonic's Blog
  • Medusa's Blog
  • Virgil61's Blog

Calendars

  • Calendar of Hisorical Roman Events
  • Events (UK and Europe)
  • Events (The Americas)

Categories

  • Free Classic Works in PDF
  • Historic Novels
  • Scientific Papers
  • Ancient Warfare Magazin

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 8 results

  1. Between 2010 and 2014, archeologists digging in London’s financial district, on the site of a new British headquarters for Bloomberg, made an astonishing discovery—a collection of more than four hundred wooden tablets, preserved in the muck of an underground river. The tablets, postcard-sized sheets of fir, spruce, and larch, dated mainly from a couple of decades after the Roman conquest of Britain, in A.D. 43, straddling the period, in the reign of Nero, when Boudica’s rebellion very nearly got rid of the occupation altogether. Eighty of them carried legible texts—legible, that is, to Roger Tomlin, one of the world’s foremost experts in very old handwriting... ...via The New Yorker
  2. The remains of a huge Roman temple, the size of St Paul's Cathedral in London has been found by a Cambridge University archaeological team in central Italy. The sacred site was uncovered several feet below Falerii Novi, an abandoned town around 30 miles north of Rome. The Falerii temple had rows of columns on three sides and is believed to cover a site 120m long and 60m wide... ...via IBTimes
  3. This was no ordinary flower pot holding up the tulips in an English garden. When an antiques expert visited Blenheim Palace in England on official business about a year ago, he happened to notice an ornately carved marble piece that was being used as a planter in one of the estate’s gardens. Something about the carvings was familiar — there was a drunken Dionysus leaning on a satyr, carved lion heads and depictions of Hercules and Ariadne merrymaking at a party. The flower pot turned out to be part of an ancient Roman sarcophagus. via NY Times
  4. Archaeologists in Greece have discovered a vast tomb that they believe is connected with the reign of the warrior-king Alexander the Great, who conquered vast areas of the ancient world between Greece and India. The tomb, dating to around 300 BC, and which may have held the body of one of Alexander’s generals or a member of his family, was found beneath a huge burial mound near the ancient site of Amphipolis in northern Greece. Antonis Samaras, Greece’s prime minister, visited the dig Tuesday and described the discovery as “clearly extremely significant.” Article continues here
  5. Archaeologists in Italy have uncovered a cemetery in the 2,700-year-old ancient port of Rome where they believe the variety of tombs found reflects the bustling town's multi-cultural nature. Ostia "was a town that was always very open, very dynamic," said Paola Germoni, the director of the sprawling site -- Italy's third most visited after the Colosseum and Pompeii. "What is original is that there are different types of funeral rites: burials and cremations," she said this week. More on AFP news site.
  6. Racy inscriptions and phalluses carved into Astypalaia's rocky peninsula shed light on very private lives of ancient Greece Wild, windswept, rocky and remote, Astypalaia is not an obvious place for the unearthing of some of the world's earliest erotic graffiti. Certainly, Dr Andreas Vlachopoulos, a specialist in prehistoric archaeology, didn't think so when he began fieldwork on the Aegean island four years ago. Until he chanced upon a couple of racy inscriptions and large phalluses carved into Astypalaia's rocky peninsula at Vathy. The inscriptions, both dating to the fifth and sixth centuries BC, were "so monumental in scale" – and so tantalisingly clear – he was left in no doubt of the motivation behind the artworks. The Guardian article continues here. P.S. For chuckles, check out the comments section.
  7. The extravagant palace of Emperor Nero, the Domus Aurea, which boasts some 300 rooms covered in dazzling polished white marble, was first uncovered in 2009 by a team of French and Italian archaeologists. Now, the luxurious palace has just revealed another surprise – a revolving dining room which once served the illustrious guests of the infamous ruler. Archaeologists have called the 2,000-year-old revolving platform one of the most peculiar and sophisticated structures of antiquity. The discovery confirms a description of the palace by ancient historian Suetonius. News article continues here.
×