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Found 10 results

  1. Viggen

    The Lion's Brood by Rafael Scott

    The historical fiction genre welcomes a new author into the field. The first book by Rafael Scott The Lion's Brood: The Story of Hannibal
  2. Mithraism May Become a Bit Less Mysterious with New Temple Discovery in Turkey. Excavations ongoing since 2013 at Zerzevan Castle in Turkey’s Diyarbakir Province have turned up secret passages leading to an underground Christian church and shelter that could hold up to 400 people. A story in the Turkish online newspaper Daily Sabah says the most recent work at the castle has found the temple to Mithras, whose ancient religion was supplanted by Christianity. Zerzevan Castle is about 55,200 square meters (594,000 square feet) and has walls 12 to 15 meters tall (39.37 to 49.2 feet tall). The watch tower is 21 meters (69 feet) tall. The walls stretch for 1,200 meters (3,937 feet). The huge complex includes a church building (aboveground), ruins of homes, buildings for administrators, and storage facilities for weapons and grain. The castle also has tombs and water channels cut into the rock... ...via Ancient Origins
  3. The garden of a large ancient house in Pompeii was home to stunning paintings depicting the Nile river flowing among green, lush landscapes. These artworks could shed light on the way the Romans viewed the ancient Egyptian culture, and how they integrated it into their own. In a study now published online in the American Journal of Archaeology, researcher Caitlin Barrett shows that these "Nilotic scenes" give the Pompeian house a more cosmopolitan feel. They transform it into a microcosm of the Roman civilisation – which at the time had spread all around the Mediterranean, all the way to Egypt... ...via IB Times
  4. Let me ask you a question. Do you love Roman history? If so, how many of you secretly dream of being there, two thousand years ago, living a life far removed from the modern rat race? Who would you want be I wonder? Perhaps a crafty slave like Frankie Howerd's Lurcio. Maybe a man of action like Russell Crowe's Maximus. Or a sophisticated and sexually ambiguous patrician like Lawrence Olivier's Crassus. Or perhaps like the vast majority of ancient Romans in real life, take on the world and make a success of yourself in latin society. If so, this is exactly the place to be, for Marcus Sidonius Falx has written down his guide to getting somewhere in ancient life - Welcone to Release Your Inner Roman... ...continue to the full review of Release Your Inner Roman by Jerry Toner
  5. Interessting article; Anti-Roman sentiment may have run rampant through Asculum, a city on the Roman Empire’s Adriatic coast, but it was still no laughing matter. Politics in the first century B.C.E., when Asculum and other Italian tribes rebelled against the Empire in what would come to be known as the Social War were no joke. But that still didn’t stop comedians and actors from injecting politics into their performances, often at their own risk. Laughter was one way to challenge authority, but it could also mean risking your life... via Smithsonian
  6. Between 2010 and 2014, archeologists digging in London’s financial district, on the site of a new British headquarters for Bloomberg, made an astonishing discovery—a collection of more than four hundred wooden tablets, preserved in the muck of an underground river. The tablets, postcard-sized sheets of fir, spruce, and larch, dated mainly from a couple of decades after the Roman conquest of Britain, in A.D. 43, straddling the period, in the reign of Nero, when Boudica’s rebellion very nearly got rid of the occupation altogether. Eighty of them carried legible texts—legible, that is, to Roger Tomlin, one of the world’s foremost experts in very old handwriting... ...via The New Yorker
  7. Imagine yourself entering the public seats of a Roman arena. Would you expect a days entertainment? Displays of martial courage? Would you become excited and spellbound by the spill of blood? Or stare horrified at the sight of men mauled and mangled by wild animals? All these emotions are attested to in the Roman sources. Today we're alternately appalled and fascinated by the subject, noting parallels with modern attitudes and behaviour, wondering whether the love of violent competition is really so alien to us. Welcome to Gladiators & Beast Hunts, a book by Dr Christopher Epplett. The first impression is largely helped by the books cover, showing mosiac imagery many will be familiar with. Presentation maintains the standards we have come to expect of the publisher and the colour photographs in the centre section are both relevant and illuminating... ...continue to the review of Gladiators & Beasthunts by Christopher Epplett
  8. Describe Roman Italy. Go on, I dare you. Chances are you're hopelessly wrong. We have just left behind a century of global conflict and competition between powerful political idealism. Vast industrial empires and centralised control. With such an astonishing hold over a vast swathe of the Known World is it any wonder we so readily connect with the Romans? Or at least we think we do. Our preconceptions are incredibly distorted by recent history and contemporary politics. If you don't believe me, A Companion To Roman Italy is a book that will teach you just how little you know... ...continue to the review of A Companion to Roman Italy by Alison E. Cooley
  9. I'm very pleased to announced publication of my latest book. The Legio XVII series, Roman Legion at War, Battle of the Danube, and just published Battle of Zama are historical fiction novels that take place during Rome’s Second Punic War with Carthage (218 - 202 BC). The fictional exploits of Legio XVII are impacted by the Punic War and its military operations are conducted in support of the overall war effort, but do not intrude into or alter actual historical events. Together, the three books present a complete summary of that ancient War. It’s available at Amazon, B&N, Apple, Smashwords, etc. Here’s the link to Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Legio-XVII-Battle-Thomas-Timmes-ebook/dp/B00ZDZONZ0/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1434061497&sr=1-1&keywords=legio+XVII%3A+Battle+of+Zama Hope you enjoy it as much as I did writing it! Legio XVII: Battle of Zama - by Thomas A. Timmes
  10. Interesting interview with Wayne Lee, a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, about the history of tunnel warfare, from ancient Rome to Vietnam to today. The audio interview itself starts at around 42s.
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