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M. Porcius Cato

Eid Mar Aureus in British Museum

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Just in time for the 2054th anniversary of the "noblest Roman"'s finest hour, the British Museum is showing the famous Eid Mar coin, minted by Brutus as he and Cassius rallied republican forces in Greece. The coin, on loan from a private collector, is one of only two gold pieces bearing the famous Phrygian cap and daggers, and it is the only one regarded as authentic. (BTW, it would make a lovely birthday gift for the anti-Caesarians among your friends and family...)

 

Roman-coin-celebrating-th-001.jpg

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It's seem this coin was famous even in ancient times: "In addition to these activities Brutus stamped upon the coins which were being minted his own likeness and a cap and two daggers, indicating by this and by the inscription that he and Cassius had liberated the fatherland." (Cassius Dio, 47.25.3)

 

_deathofcaesar__by_LeoLeonardo.gif

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I'm interested in the 'Imp' on the side of the coin. This suggests that Brutus had been hailed as 'Imperator' or 'conquering general'. Is there any other record of this having happened?

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I'm interested in the 'Imp' on the side of the coin. This suggests that Brutus had been hailed as 'Imperator' or 'conquering general'. Is there any other record of this having happened?

 

"Brutus now summoned Cassius to Sardis [42 BC], and as he drew near, went to meet him with his friends; and the whole army, in full array, saluted them both as Imperators." (Plutarchus, Life of Brutus, 34)

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Just in time for the 2054th anniversary of the "noblest Roman"'s finest hour, the British Museum is showing the famous Eid Mar coin, minted by Brutus as he and Cassius rallied republican forces in Greece. The coin, on loan from a private collector, is one of only two gold pieces bearing the famous Phrygian cap and daggers, and it is the only one regarded as authentic. (BTW, it would make a lovely birthday gift for the anti-Caesarians among your friends and family...)

 

Nice coin. Too much for my pocket book. It looks like it sold for more than $92,000 in 2004. Here's what the coin looked like at auction and the associated information:

 

http://www.acsearch.info/search.html?searc...p;view_mode=1#1

 

 

 

 

guy also known as gaius

 

(Please consider having this thread moved to the Numismatica subforum.)

Edited by guy

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Here's information about the coin at auction in case we loose the above link (edit mine):

 

The Roman Republic

 

M. Iunius Brutus with L. Plaetorius Caestianus.

 

No.: 282

 

Estimate: CHF 60000 [sold for $92,865 on 12.05.2004]

 

d=22 mm

Aureus [gold], mint moving with Brutus in Northern Greece circa 43-42, AV 7.84 g. BRVT IMP

Edited by guy

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I'm interested in the 'Imp' on the side of the coin. This suggests that Brutus had been hailed as 'Imperator' or 'conquering general'. Is there any other record of this having happened?

 

wasn`t the fact to show a living persons head on a coin alone inconsistent with the usual republican tradition?

 

in anycase here is another fine one in silver ...

 

M JUNIUS BRUTUS

AR-Denarius, 3,59 g.

Mint moving with Brutus. summer 42 Bc..

Obv.: L PLAET CEST / BRVT IMP

Head of Brutus r.

Rev.: EID MAR

Pileus between two daggers.

*A classical author, Dio Cassius

Extremely rare and the finest known specimen!

FDC

Beautiful tone. Swiss private collection

 

http://www.acsearch.info/record.html?id=7671

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wasn`t the fact to show a living persons head on a coin alone inconsistent with the usual republican tradition?

 

Only Caesar had really printed his own likeness on a coin. Sulla's image was represented in quadriga (riding a chariot and in celebration of his triumph over Mithridates) but there is no facial likeness). However, as Caesar had been presenting his own image for about 3 years (starting around 47 BC) it was no longer out of the norm.

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