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GhostOfClayton

Identify the Ancient God

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Number 3

 

mosaic1.jpg

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Yep, I'm happy to agree that this is probably Hera. My comment was aimed at the original statue by which GhostofClayton started the discussion - which is apparently Venus from Augusta Raurica.

 

(Which is where I believe the other 'Bacchus' statuette in our discussion also originates ...)

 

My apologies, I didn't see that we had on 1a and one 1.

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My apologies, I didn't see that we had on 1a and one 1.

 

I nominated Hera as Number 1a, as she arrived in the form of a comparrison comment associated with Number 1. Don't worry, my attempts at clarification often cause more confusion.

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Number 2

 

Must be Narcissus:

1) Because he 's looking downwards (he is in love with his own reflection in the water).

2) He's often decorated with ivy leaves in his hair (as symbol of young charming adorable).

3) His index-finger holding up represent the refusal of many would-be lovers, especially Echo.

and also his interest in his own resemblance of his mirror image. Like he is saying: "Wait, stop,

where is that good looking fellow I just saw."

 

Note: The greek pendant of Narcissus is Narkissos, same myth.

Here's a fresco from Pompei I saw this summer in the museum of Naples.

 

Narcissus_Pompei.jpg

Edited by Auris Arrectibus

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I'm impressed Auris! It's an excellent identification that sounds completely reasonable to me!

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Sorry about that. I was using an image from North Lincolnshire council's website, which now seems to have been removed (great pitty!). It was from the mosaic mentioned here. It doesn't really matter now, but it was the centerpiece of that wonderful mosaic, and was Ceres, as evident by the presence of a cornucopia.

Edited by GhostOfClayton

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The staff is interesting. Do you know what was on the end? A wizard's staff might just have a knob on the end, but one can learn a lot from the symbol topping off a mythic staff.

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The staff is interesting. Do you know what was on the end? A wizard's staff might just have a knob on the end, but one can learn a lot from the symbol topping off a mythic staff.

 

That would be great to know. And doesn't he wear shoes? I'm thinking Hermes

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The staff is interesting. Do you know what was on the end? A wizard's staff might just have a knob on the end, but one can learn a lot from the symbol topping off a mythic staff.

 

That would be great to know. And doesn't he wear shoes? I'm thinking Hermes

 

If this is about the fresco of Narcissus from Pompe

Edited by Auris Arrectibus

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If this is about the fresco of Narcissus from Pompe

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Wings . . . Female. . . Victory, perhaps?

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Wings . . . Female. . . Victory, perhaps?

 

number 27

 

Yep, identified by her wings and laurel wreath.

 

Other symbols: palm branch and (driving) a chariot.

Wearing a flowing robe, extending a wreath, young and strong (athletic trained for war).

See the both fresco's from Pompei (with a cornucopia, result of victory, also a roman theme) and Herculaneum.

 

Unlike the greek Nike the romans associated her with Bellona (the war-goddess, a mature type with a helmet).

Victoria Bellona depicted in a 16th century painting by LeNain. While the Greek associated Nike with Athena (wisdom goddess).

 

When a Victoria look-a-like is playing the trumpet, then it's Fama (fame-goddess).

In the picture not roman time statues, though.

 

"Augustus had an altar to Victoria installed in the senate building, the Curia Julia, with a statue of Victoria standing with one foot on a globe. When in 382 AD her statue was removed by the emperor Gratian there was much resistance in the heathen reactionary circles. The cult of Victoria was one of the last pagan cults to succumb to Christianity. The fact that this cult lasted so long is probably due to the fact that she was very popular with the military which made it quite dangerous to ban or forbid her worship outright. By the end of the fourth century, the winged Victory had been transformed into the figure of an angel, the intermediary and attendant of God".

 

Victoria_5.png

Edited by Auris Arrectibus

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