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lothia

Imperial Post Warrants

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Ave Civitas,

 

  I understand that high officials were given (or could issue) Imperial Post Warrants.

  I understand that the post warrant allows that official to use the Imperial Post to transport persons of material (using the Post resources)

  What I don't understand is how they were used.

From the ND I have:

The count of Egypt is entitled to seven post-warrants in the year.

 My question is:

  1.  Are these post warrants a consumable authority.  That is, can he only use the Imperial Post seven times in a year to move persons or things?  (this is what the line seems to indicate but then in unusual circumstances could he apply to the Master Of Offices for a one time' special issue of an warrant - (would that have been possible?)

  2.  Are these post warrants a limit to the active use of the Imperial Post resources to move things (that is can he only have seven events occurring at the any one time during the year)

 

I thank you in advance for your help.

 

Tom

Edited by lothia

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Interesting conundrum. The later empire was weighed down with bureaucracy so it isn't beyond reason that you're right, but a part of me thinks that the warrant was merely a badge of authority to send messages rather than the message itself. It seems ridiculous that a senior government official could only send a limited number of messages, but then, was this an official limit to prevent using official business to cover nefarious activity? I must consider this further. :)

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As I understand it, the warrant was a kind of badge given to an individual thus allowed to use the imperial post system for a determined amount of time (at the most the length of the holding of office of the delivering magistrate). Reasons for setting such a limit were limited availlability of remounts and the cost of the system.

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And also the privilege, also the burden of of official pay for all these messengers.

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