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Caesar's Gallic Legions, Without Armor?

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P.Pilus

 

 

The person I emailed was probably a sales rep who had nothing to do with the sculpting of the figures or any detailed knowledge of the history behind them. The person who had sculpted the line was not part of the company.

 

 

 

 

I must say that the Foundry models I have seen have very good attention to detail (lorica hamata is correctly portrayed, wearing the right type of helmet, swords.. . even down to the Centurion wearing his scabbard on the left while rank and file wear them on the right) in Romans and other cultures (Trojan War Greeks, Spartans, Late Imperials) that seem to coincide with the facts as I have learned them. That is why when I saw the unarmored legionaires I assumed I was lacking in my knowledge of the equipment of Caesar's troops.

 

I don't see it as an attempt to earn more revenue (they offer a full stocked properly armored version of his troops) and there is no repeat of this in any other model set (republican, Imperial, or Late Roman armies)

 

It's a mystery. . . .

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Another line of enquiry might be to check current books on Roman uniforms/equipment such as the osprey line.

 

Designers of figures, in my experience, often use such sources.

 

I looked at my books to see - Osprey's revised "Roman Army from Casear to Trajan" only has mail clad soldiers for Caesar's day.

 

But Peter conolly might have shown different - I'll check later.

 

And what are re-enactor's doing?

 

I'm sure the designer would have had a source as such people are artists first military experts second.

 

Phil

 

Further searching before going to work - I found in Osprey's "Roman Military Clothing (1) 100BC to AD 200" a black and white drawing of a sculpture. The caption reads:

 

"Late Republican and early imperial tunics - soldiers from the arch at Susa...(:pokey: seems only to be wearing a tunic with a fabric waistband. (This arch is dated as "Augustan").

 

On the same page (6) there is another darwing from the arch at Orange (in Gaul of course!!) which shows soldiers wearing no armour - just a tunic, clearly knotted between the shoulder blades.

 

Don't know whether this helps?

Edited by phil25

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To fight without full armor is to fight expedetii , allowing fast assault ahead of a main battle line , or to be a flexible javelin throwing aid to same.I understand that Tacitus mentions heavy troops fighting expeditii to increase manoeuvrability.

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To fight without full armor is to fight expedetii , allowing fast assault ahead of a main battle line , or to be a flexible javelin throwing aid to same.I understand that Tacitus mentions heavy troops fighting expeditii to increase manoeuvrability.

 

 

Good point Pertinax.

 

I have heard the term expeditii before but I don't recall Caesar ever using his legions in such a fashion (but I haven't read The Gallic Wars in 10 years. . .) probably the best lead so far. When I get home I will do some reading. . .

 

 

Thanks

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