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aiden12

What's the last book you read?

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And now I've come away from the ancient world for a little while, and am revisiting the excellent The Sunne in Splendour by Sharon K. Penman - a novel I first read years ago. Like an old vintage it has matured beautifully with the distance of years, and captures the character of Richard III so beautifully that it must rank as THE definitive Dicky 3 novel.

 

It's not bad, but I much preferred her book 'Here be Dragons' about Llewelyn Fawr, Prince of Wales during the reign of King John. I think she captures my vision of John, as well as enhancing my love of Welsh history.

 

I've never thought of getting this, Sonic. I enjoy her writing, but do you think I'd enjoy the novel? I should say that I have no interest at all in Welsh history (I don't mean that nastily in any way - it's just not an area that grabs me). Could I be converted? I'll give it a go one of these days and let you know.

 

I've now turned to total trash for the daily bus journeys and am wallowing like a pig in..... in Stephen King's Christine After that I intend to get back to serious research - I think my brain will need to be reminded that it works. Ah well, even old Stevie has his place in the dreary agony that is my daily route to and from work. :P

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I've now turned to total trash for the daily bus journeys and am wallowing like a pig in..... in Stephen King's Christine After that I intend to get back to serious research

 

I used to read a lot of Stephen King when I was a teenager. At some point though I think all his stories kind of run together.

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I've now turned to total trash for the daily bus journeys and am wallowing like a pig in..... in Stephen King's Christine After that I intend to get back to serious research - I think my brain will need to be reminded that it works. Ah well, even old Stevie has his place in the dreary agony that is my daily route to and from work. :rolleyes:

 

Before you get back to some serious research you should definitely read The Stand by Stephen King. It is IMO the best book written by King, it's quite a hefty book with some 1000+ pages but it's a serious page turner and I got through it in no time.

 

This will surely turn your dreary agony into a thrilling journey in no time!!! :D

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Before you get back to some serious research you should definitely read The Stand by Stephen King. It is IMO the best book written by King, it's quite a hefty book with some 1000+ pages but it's a serious page turner and I got through it in no time.

 

This will surely turn your dreary agony into a thrilling journey in no time!!! :rolleyes:

 

Oh, I've read The Stand, GPM - one of his best. Yes, I loved that one - thought it was pretty well-written, and perhaps some of his best characterisations. I actually read both versions over the years - the cut-down one and the full. I didn't think they did it justice when they dramatised it.

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Oh, I've read The Stand, GPM - one of his best. Yes, I loved that one - thought it was pretty well-written, and perhaps some of his best characterisations. I actually read both versions over the years - the cut-down one and the full. I didn't think they did it justice when they dramatised it.

 

The TV movie they made was pretty terrible really, very low budget, a shame really, if some big Hollywood producer had got his hands on it then it would have been much better, it has the potential to be a pretty epic movie.

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I recently finished reading Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson--an absolutely amazing read, and anyone interested in WWII-era and modern day cryptanalysis should check it out. (It is, it should be noted, a work of fiction.)

 

Right now, I'm reading The Fall of the Roman Empire by Peter Heather. I haven't read much about late Imperial Rome, but this one has certainly grabbed my attention. I'm reading it on the Amazon Kindle, so I'm not sure how far along I am in page numbers, but I've only read 5% of it so far, so I'll be reading this for a while. Then I plan on reading either Goldsworthy's new one or Tom Holland's new one--I have a paperback ARC sitting by me on the shelf, but I haven't cracked it open yet.

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Right now I'm reading Adrian Goldsworthy's new book. I'm also re-reading Jesus: Apocalyptic Prophet of the New Millennium by Bart D. Ehrman. I recently re-read the New Testament and plan on doing some homework regarding the context of first century Judea--just for, you know, fun.

 

I also managed to snag a hardcover first edition of Marcus Crassus and the Late Roman Republic on ebay for $36.00. I was extremely excited about that, and I'm going to start reading it as soon as it gets here.

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Roman Art by Siebler. A review is dutifully posted in the queue for submission.

 

 

I'm also re-reading Jesus: Apocalyptic Prophet of the New Millennium by Bart D. Ehrman

Sounds interesting, DDickey. I think you should do a review on it for UNRV!

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Roman Art by Siebler. A review is dutifully posted in the queue for submission.

 

 

I'm also re-reading Jesus: Apocalyptic Prophet of the New Millennium by Bart D. Ehrman

Sounds interesting, DDickey. I think you should do a review on it for UNRV!

 

Well, I can certainly give it a try! I'm fairly familiar with the material, so that helps.

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I am now reading "The Chosen People" by John M Allegro.

 

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the name, Professor Allegro was part of the original team that translated the Dead Sea Scrolls.

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I am now reading "The Chosen People" by John M Allegro.

 

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the name, Professor Allegro was part of the original team that translated the Dead Sea Scrolls.

 

Sounds interesting. Please let me know what you thought about it when you finish.

 

I, over the past couple months, have been interested in Judaea from Alexander the Great to the destruction of the Temple, and, a little later, the Bar Kochba revolt. Right now I'm reading From the Maccabees to the Mishnah by Shaye J.D. Cohen, and when I finish that I plan on reading, Heritage and Hellenism: the Reinvention of Jewish Tradition by Erich S. Gruen, a name familiar to some, if not most, on this board.

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OK, you guys - if you think your reading is specialised....

 

Try the Baron and Court Leet Records of Northenden and Etchells 1603-1760, in original manuscript form in the Archives at Manchester Library! :P I should explain that it was for my family history project which I must now definitely write up before time runs out and I go to join all my ancestors in the big Smithy in the sky. Of course, I can't quite get the old tree back to Roman times.....

 

And for light relief, after peering at all that 17th century secretarial script, my bus book this week is a totally rubbish novel by Margaret Dickinson, set at the turn of the last century. Predictable, not brilliantly written, and full of two-dimensional characters - but my brain can't cope with much more at the moment. This little ditty is like Catherine Cookson set in Lincolnshire - just to give you all an idea!

 

However, on my 'To Read' list for next week's bus journeys is Levick's Vespasian - which looks nice and accessible to ease me back into the world of academia. I'll let you know how this one pans out.

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I am now reading "The Chosen People" by John M Allegro.

 

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the name, Professor Allegro was part of the original team that translated the Dead Sea Scrolls.

 

Sounds interesting. Please let me know what you thought about it when you finish.

 

I, over the past couple months, have been interested in Judaea from Alexander the Great to the destruction of the Temple, and, a little later, the Bar Kochba revolt. Right now I'm reading From the Maccabees to the Mishnah by Shaye J.D. Cohen, and when I finish that I plan on reading, Heritage and Hellenism: the Reinvention of Jewish Tradition by Erich S. Gruen, a name familiar to some, if not most, on this board.

 

The book is erudite and informative, as are most of his works, and, in spite of the academic background of the author, surprisingly readable. Depending on your point of view, you may or may not appreciate his highly critical stance vis a vis the Maccabeans and their later Zealot descendants.

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Javier Sierra's books

The Lady in Blue: a Novel

The Secret Supper.

 

I have read both books and am puzzled, not by the stories but by the writing and construction of the stories. I didnt want to keep reading them, but had to know the ending, even though the ending was always implied.

 

Has any one else read them?

 

Are they puzzling because of the translation from Spanish?

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I found a $100 textbook on Art History for $10 from a used books vendor. :-)

 

And I love it so far. I never cared much about art beyond the ancient world, but this is really giving me a broader and deeper perspective.

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