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falkor

Bath House Questions

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1) How many different types of rooms were in the biggest of bath houses? Cold, Warm, Hot, changing room? Any others?

2) Did the cold room double as a changing room or were they always both separate?

3) Which rooms had actual pools filled with water or were there no strict rules to this?

4) Why might a bath house have had the same type of room multiple times? For example, 2 lots of warm rooms and 2 lots of cold rooms?

5) What order did typical Romans enter each type of room, or were there no strict rules to this?

6) What was the floor made out of that sat directly on top of the hypercaust pillars? Please be very specific, and state if possible, where else this material would be used in other types of Roman buildings. Was it a material used only for flooring etc?

7) Why were the roofs vaulted? What about bath houses without vaulted roofs? What's the difference?

 

Any help would be much appreciated!

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1) How many different types of rooms were in the biggest of bath houses? Cold, Warm, Hot, changing room? Any others?

 

Counting rooms would be an almost endless endeavor. If you are interested in taking a closer look in the plans of roman baths I would recommend; Nielsen, I., Thermae et balnea, catalogue and plates,

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Thank you very much indeed for the comprehensive reply--especially question 1 and the recommendations.

 

There were special changing rooms called Apodytherium.

OK, but just to clarify, did cold rooms also double as changing rooms in smaller bathhouses?

 

I'm not 100% sure but I could bet a lot that it's made out of terracotta with marble or mosaics on top. Terracotta var also used for the walls, but here it was hollow to allow hot air to pass trough.

What does this terracotta look like on Roman buildings? Please can you provide any links to photos? I know about the marble and mosaic layers, just not sure about the layer underneath.

 

Vaults were the easiest, strong and to a a certain degree the only way the Romans could build large open rooms. As baths commonly have large rooms, vaults are used normal. It's simply practical.

Plunge pools were often very small and against a wall, so I do not believe vaulted ceilings were designed for more room space, as the people didn't really need it; they could make do with columns as in other public buildings. I believe the vaulted roofs may have more to do with the fact that ordinary tiled roofs--supported by wood--were a fire hazard. However, this doesn't explain why some bathhouses did seemingly have ordinary roofs.

 

I cannot understand Swedish, but thanks all the same.

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Perhaps the flooring goes something like this, though in this example (Darenth Villa), they used the blox-flue tiles as pillars (must have over ordered on them):

DSC05587.jpg

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Hi falkor

 

For a good description on bath houses use my link below to my own site about Hadrian's Wall (soon to be re-written and completed) and on Wall Forts menu click Segedunum. On the right of the menu bar another link appears for Segedunum. Hover on that until a drop down link for baths appears. Click on that and get a full description of the bath house at Segedunum with links for each room contained within with plenty photographs to boot.

 

Visit My Hadrian's Wall Website

 

I hope that helps you falkor at least to some extent.

Edited by Augustus Caesar

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I was also wondering is oil applied and scraped off after or before a bath?

 

I do not know, but I would guess that before would be the norm. However it may be changed with personal taste.

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All baths were not exactly the same.

According to this site http://www.falcophiles.co.uk/facts/romanbathing.html some smaller baths (such as those at Wellwyn shown) did not have specific changing rooms.

 

There is also a plan of the baths of Caracalla with separate changing rooms and much more.

 

It seems to me that there really is a need for the sort of archaeological reconstruction that has been applied to Celtic roundhouses to be done for Roman baths. Completely rebuilding a bath complex and using it to see what works best.

 

While I'm here, however I need some more info.

 

Wikipedia lists a number of Roman bath ruins starting with the Baths of Agrippa built in 19BC and various others all built later.

 

Does anybody know of baths complexes built any earlier?

What baths were around in the early part of the first century BC?

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Wow. I'm impressed by the knowledge of Roman baths around here. :thumbsup:

 

One day, I hope to visit this famous bath in England:

 

post-3665-017255700 1293810457_thumb.jpg

 

I'm probably wrong on this theory...but that never stopped me from spouting my nonsense :lol: :

 

I always thought the concept of the "Roman baths" to be a modern oversimplification and obsession. The "Roman baths" were really part of a much larger "leisure or pleasure center," with the baths only the main modern focus of a much larger complex.

 

I read somewhere that the "Baths of Diocletian" could accomodate 3000 bathers, but the entire complex was 32 acres with lecture halls, libraries, gyms, and gardens.

 

Pictures of the ruins of the Baths of Caracalla:

 

post-3665-074433700 1293809367_thumb.jpg

post-3665-069137200 1293809352_thumb.jpg

 

Modern depiction of the Baths of Caracalla:

post-3665-090418800 1293809326_thumb.jpg

post-3665-028744400 1293809309_thumb.jpg

post-3665-062817500 1293809290_thumb.jpg

 

Some strigils and an Ancient Roman Hugh Hefner's strigil party. B)

 

post-3665-026385300 1293810049_thumb.jpg

post-3665-044946000 1293811483_thumb.jpg

post-3665-031909300 1293811463_thumb.jpg

post-3665-071692400 1293810065_thumb.jpg

 

Oh, well. It's time for my bath now. "Hey, who's got my strigil?" :P

 

 

guy also known as gaius

Edited by guy

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It seems to me that there really is a need for the sort of archaeological reconstruction that has been applied to Celtic roundhouses to be done for Roman baths. Completely rebuilding a bath complex and using it to see what works best.

 

That has actually been done on a very small scale by NOVA and

Several authorities were involved (Yeg

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That has actually been done on a very small scale by NOVA and you can watch it here.

 

Great program. Thanks. Especially hilarious were the scenes of Garrett Fagan's being strigiled and his visit to an ancient toilet. Too funny.

 

:D

 

Thank you, again.

 

 

guy also known as gaius

Edited by guy

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