Jump to content
UNRV Ancient Roman Empire Forums
  • Time Travel Rome

WotWotius

Crassus As A General.

Recommended Posts

I'm aware of the fact that Crassus successfully crushed the Spartican rebellion in 71BC, and that he presided over the disaster at Carhae in 53BC. But what I would like to know is whether or not there are any reports of Crassus being at the head of an army between these dates.

 

Can anybody help?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm aware of the fact that Crassus successfully crushed the Spartican rebellion in 71BC, and that he presided over the disaster at Carhae in 53BC. But what I would like to know is whether or not there are any reports of Crassus being at the head of an army between these dates.

 

Can anybody help?

 

Prior to Spartacus he joined Metellus in Africa and later was a legate under Sulla, but otherwise no, he did not lead an army during the time period suggested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose that's why he was so eager to get command in Syria in 54BC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I suppose that's why he was so eager to get command in Syria in 54BC

 

Certainly to match the glory of Caesar and even Pompey... to go along with his fortune I suppose. (or perhaps simply to add to that fortune)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I suppose that's why he was so eager to get command in Syria in 54BC

 

 

I think Crassus felt like he was the lesser of the other triumvirs and although he was probably the richest man in Rome he'd had no real success on the battlefield where as Caesar and Pompey were already accomplished generals, no matter how rich you were the people of Rome would always love a war hero above everyone else and although he had the status of wealth he never really had the love of the people

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think Crassus felt like he was the lesser of the other triumvirs and although he was probably the richest man in Rome he'd had no real success on the battlefield where as Caesar and Pompey were already accomplished generals, no matter how rich you were the people of Rome would always love a war hero above everyone else and although he had the status of wealth he never really had the love of the people

 

He was also getting older, time was running out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps this is a bit off topic. He had his own personal fire brigade. When a fire broke out in Rome, they would respond but not put the fire out until the owner was made to see that it was best to sell the property to Crassus - at his price. He was also Caesar's largest creditor.

 

I am not so sure that his efforts in the war against Sparticus could be called a success. Sparticus out witted Crassus too often.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Perhaps this is a bit off topic. He had his own personal fire brigade. When a fire broke out in Rome, they would respond but not put the fire out until the owner was made to see that it was best to sell the property to Crassus - at his price. He was also Caesar's largest creditor.

 

According to Plutarch, his fire brigade were a troop of highly trained slaves (taught by Crassus himself), who also renovated the recently purchased properties after the fire had been extinguished.

Edited by WotWotius

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Perhaps this is a bit off topic. He had his own personal fire brigade. When a fire broke out in Rome, they would respond but not put the fire out until the owner was made to see that it was best to sell the property to Crassus - at his price. He was also Caesar's largest creditor.

 

I am not so sure that his efforts in the war against Sparticus could be called a success. Sparticus out witted Crassus too often.

 

Crassus made his fortune off the backs of the poor, by becoming Rome's biggest landlord. Many of the fires were started by his own team and then put out by his fire brigade. He was unscrupulous and I think, possibly despised by Caesar, who would never stoop to such lowly methods of amassing wealth. However, both Pompey and Caesar needed Crassus for his money, especially Caesar, due to his huge debts.

 

You are right about Crassus's leadership in the field. He was not much of a general and his men paid for it dearly in his disastrous Parthian campaign. His death was horrible, as he was tortured by the Parthian general and died swallowing molten gold, according to one account I read.

Edited by Skarr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Surena (the general in question) is said to have been outraged that a man would start a war simply for profit alone. The choice of death was as a punishment for veniality and a lack of honourable intent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fact that Crassus instigated war with Parthia solely for finical gain stirred up such an outrage in the Senate that one of the leading tribunes, Capito, went as far as ritualistically cursing him.

 

Apparently tribune was later prosecuted for doing such an effective job of it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm aware of the fact that Crassus successfully crushed the Spartican rebellion in 71BC, and that he presided over the disaster at Carhae in 53BC. But what I would like to know is whether or not there are any reports of Crassus being at the head of an army between these dates.

 

Can anybody help?

 

Crassus commanded Sulla's right wing at the decisive battle of the Colline Gate in 82BC. While Sullas' left was driven back against the walls of Rome, Crassus' troops crushed the enemy opposed to them and won the victory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Crassus commanded Sulla's right wing at the decisive battle of the Colline Gate in 82BC. While Sullas' left was driven back against the walls of Rome, Crassus' troops crushed the enemy opposed to them and won the victory.

 

As PP mentioned above. And this command occurred earlier than Spartacus, not between Spartacus and Carrhae, which is the time period in question. So, no--Crassus commanded nothing between Spartacus and Cannae, except his army of tax-farmers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was there any apology of any sort sent to Parthia as it was not the intentions of Rome? I know the Romans didn't get the standards back for a long time...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Map of the Roman Empire

×