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aiden12

What's the last book you read?

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I am currently reading Richard Miles' Carthage Must Be Destroyed The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization. I have to say Miles' style of narrative really appeals to me... it is really accessible as well as informative, as to be honest I am not exceedingly knowledgeable when it comes to the Western Mediterranean Civilizations. I first came across Richard Miles in my local library where I borrowed and read his book on Alexander the Great's Successors and I've been somewhat addicted to his books ever since. :)

 

I think Richard Miles is fairly main stream and well known, so I would imagine many of you would have heard of him or read some of his work. Ever since I picked up his book on Carthage I haven't been able to put it down... I would most definitely recommend it!

 

Was just wondering whether anyone could point me towards any other accessible modern scholarship on the topic of Carthage and her ascendency in the Western Med (emphasis on accessible as I am not that knowledgeable as perviously stated). All help would be much appreciated! :)

 

BTW Noricum I haven't heard of Mary Renault's books on Alexander The Great's life. Sounds like an interesting angle will have to look them up :).

Edited by AEGYPTUS

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I am currently reading Richard Miles' Carthage Must Be Destroyed The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization. I have to say Miles' style of narrative really appeals to me... it is really accessible as well as informative, as to be honest I am not exceedingly knowledgeable when it comes to the Western Mediterranean Civilizations. I first came across Richard Miles in my local library where I borrowed and read his book on Alexander the Great's Successors and I've been somewhat addicted to his books ever since. :)

 

I think Richard Miles is fairly main stream and well known, so I would imagine many of you would have heard of him or read some of his work. Ever since I picked up his book on Carthage I haven't been able to put it down... I would most definitely recommend it!

 

Was just wondering whether anyone could point me towards any other accessible modern scholarship on the topic of Carthage and her ascendency in the Western Med (emphasis on accessible as I am not that knowledgeable as perviously stated). All help would be much appreciated! :)

 

BTW Noricum I haven't heard of Mary Renault's books on Alexander The Great's life. Sounds like an interesting angle will have to look them up :).

 

Carthage must be Destroyed is currently on my future reading list> I got the book as a gift this Christmas, but I still haven't got round to reading it yet.

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Ah, I read one by her; not the one you are reading - but also about Alexander ... I really really liked it. I'm scrapping my memory, but can't come up with the title. Tell me if you like this one when you are finished.

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Anyone here read any books by Mary Renault? I've just started reading a book by this author - The Persian Boy, which was recommended by a work colleague who has kindly lent it to me

 

It traces the last seven years of Alexander the Great's life through the eyes of his Persian lover, the eunuch Bagoas - who is based on a real historical figure

 

It's such a pain having to work - if only I could retire and read all the books I need to read before I fall off the perch!

 

I read FIRE FROM HEAVEN, THE PERSIAN BOY, and THE KING MUST DIE by Renault. They were all good and I've listed them in order of my preference.

 

Also, anyone considering Steven Saylor might want to start with his first book ROMAN BLOOD. I love his writing and have read a about six of his novels. I've read Scarrow too, but I lean toward Saylor more.

 

For those who like the 5th century like me there's THE SWORD OF ATTILA by Michael Curtis Ford and THE SCOURGE OF GOD by William Dietrich.

 

Cinzia

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I am currently reading Richard Miles' Carthage Must Be Destroyed The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization. I have to say Miles' style of narrative really appeals to me... it is really accessible as well as informative, as to be honest I am not exceedingly knowledgeable when it comes to the Western Mediterranean Civilizations. I first came across Richard Miles in my local library where I borrowed and read his book on Alexander the Great's Successors and I've been somewhat addicted to his books ever since. :)

 

I think Richard Miles is fairly main stream and well known, so I would imagine many of you would have heard of him or read some of his work. Ever since I picked up his book on Carthage I haven't been able to put it down... I would most definitely recommend it!

 

Was just wondering whether anyone could point me towards any other accessible modern scholarship on the topic of Carthage and her ascendency in the Western Med (emphasis on accessible as I am not that knowledgeable as perviously stated). All help would be much appreciated! :)

 

BTW Noricum I haven't heard of Mary Renault's books on Alexander The Great's life. Sounds like an interesting angle will have to look them up :).

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I am currently reading Richard Miles' Carthage Must Be Destroyed The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization. I have to say Miles' style of narrative really appeals to me... it is really accessible as well as informative, as to be honest I am not exceedingly knowledgeable when it comes to the Western Mediterranean Civilizations. I first came across Richard Miles in my local library where I borrowed and read his book on Alexander the Great's Successors and I've been somewhat addicted to his books ever since. :)

 

I think Richard Miles is fairly main stream and well known, so I would imagine many of you would have heard of him or read some of his work. Ever since I picked up his book on Carthage I haven't been able to put it down... I would most definitely recommend it!

 

Was just wondering whether anyone could point me towards any other accessible modern scholarship on the topic of Carthage and her ascendency in the Western Med (emphasis on accessible as I am not that knowledgeable as perviously stated). All help would be much appreciated! :)

 

BTW Noricum I haven't heard of Mary Renault's books on Alexander The Great's life. Sounds like an interesting angle will have to look them up :).

 

I'm having trouble replying - darn computer plus fat fingers!

 

You might like Adrian Goldsworthy's book The Fall of Carthage - it's a great read and I do enjoy his writing style

Edited by Noricum

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Anyone here read any books by Mary Renault? I've just started reading a book by this author - The Persian Boy, which was recommended by a work colleague who has kindly lent it to me

 

It traces the last seven years of Alexander the Great's life through the eyes of his Persian lover, the eunuch Bagoas - who is based on a real historical figure

 

It's such a pain having to work - if only I could retire and read all the books I need to read before I fall off the perch!

 

I read FIRE FROM HEAVEN, THE PERSIAN BOY, and THE KING MUST DIE by Renault. They were all good and I've listed them in order of my preference.

 

Also, anyone considering Steven Saylor might want to start with his first book ROMAN BLOOD. I love his writing and have read a about six of his novels. I've read Scarrow too, but I lean toward Saylor more.

 

For those who like the 5th century like me there's THE SWORD OF ATTILA by Michael Curtis Ford and THE SCOURGE OF GOD by William Dietrich.

 

Cinzia

 

Thanks for your recommendation - I'll look for those other books by Mary Renault

 

The Persian Boy is good - the writng is so evocative and there hasn't been a page of the book where I've felt like skimming over to the next page

 

We picked up a Steven Saylor book in an everything for $5 bookshop before Christmas but I haven't started it yet - Empire

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You might like Adrian Goldsworthy's book The Fall of Carthage - it's a great read and I do enjoy his writing style

 

And there's also the documentary 'Carthage: The Roman Holocaust' that is presented by Richard Miles himself. It sometimes finds its way onto More4.

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I am currently reading Richard Miles' Carthage Must Be Destroyed The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization. I have to say Miles' style of narrative really appeals to me... it is really accessible as well as informative, as to be honest I am not exceedingly knowledgeable when it comes to the Western Mediterranean Civilizations. I first came across Richard Miles in my local library where I borrowed and read his book on Alexander the Great's Successors and I've been somewhat addicted to his books ever since. :)

 

I think Richard Miles is fairly main stream and well known, so I would imagine many of you would have heard of him or read some of his work. Ever since I picked up his book on Carthage I haven't been able to put it down... I would most definitely recommend it!

 

Was just wondering whether anyone could point me towards any other accessible modern scholarship on the topic of Carthage and her ascendency in the Western Med (emphasis on accessible as I am not that knowledgeable as perviously stated). All help would be much appreciated! :)

 

BTW Noricum I haven't heard of Mary Renault's books on Alexander The Great's life. Sounds like an interesting angle will have to look them up :).

 

Carthage must be Destroyed is currently on my future reading list> I got the book as a gift this Christmas, but I still haven't got round to reading it yet.

 

this book is one my wish list as well.. and this is encouraging the buying of it :):)

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Anyone here read any books by Mary Renault? I've just started reading a book by this author - The Persian Boy, which was recommended by a work colleague who has kindly lent it to me

 

It traces the last seven years of Alexander the Great's life through the eyes of his Persian lover, the eunuch Bagoas - who is based on a real historical figure

 

It's such a pain having to work - if only I could retire and read all the books I need to read before I fall off the perch!

 

I read FIRE FROM HEAVEN, THE PERSIAN BOY, and THE KING MUST DIE by Renault. They were all good and I've listed them in order of my preference.

 

Also, anyone considering Steven Saylor might want to start with his first book ROMAN BLOOD. I love his writing and have read a about six of his novels. I've read Scarrow too, but I lean toward Saylor more.

 

For those who like the 5th century like me there's THE SWORD OF ATTILA by Michael Curtis Ford and THE SCOURGE OF GOD by William Dietrich.

 

Cinzia

 

Thanks for your recommendation - I'll look for those other books by Mary Renault

 

The Persian Boy is good - the writng is so evocative and there hasn't been a page of the book where I've felt like skimming over to the next page

 

We picked up a Steven Saylor book in an everything for $5 bookshop before Christmas but I haven't started it yet - Empire

 

I didnt enjoy Mary Renault's books but theSword of Attila looks likes interesting and so does Gods and Legions(Julian is one of my most favourite Romans.) and I must find out where my copy of The Eagle in the Snow is. It is time for a re-read.

Edited by Artimi

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I am currently reading Richard Miles' Carthage Must Be Destroyed The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization. I have to say Miles' style of narrative really appeals to me... it is really accessible as well as informative, as to be honest I am not exceedingly knowledgeable when it comes to the Western Mediterranean Civilizations. I first came across Richard Miles in my local library where I borrowed and read his book on Alexander the Great's Successors and I've been somewhat addicted to his books ever since. :)

 

I think Richard Miles is fairly main stream and well known, so I would imagine many of you would have heard of him or read some of his work. Ever since I picked up his book on Carthage I haven't been able to put it down... I would most definitely recommend it!

 

Was just wondering whether anyone could point me towards any other accessible modern scholarship on the topic of Carthage and her ascendency in the Western Med (emphasis on accessible as I am not that knowledgeable as perviously stated). All help would be much appreciated! :)

 

BTW Noricum I haven't heard of Mary Renault's books on Alexander The Great's life. Sounds like an interesting angle will have to look them up :).

 

I'm having trouble replying - darn computer plus fat fingers!

 

You might like Adrian Goldsworthy's book The Fall of Carthage - it's a great read and I do enjoy his writing style

 

Adrian Goldsworthy definitely ring a bell for me, I think I may have read a book by him on the Roman Army already... and if the memory serves I found it rather enjoyable will have to look it up! Thanks Noricum! :)

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Anyone here read any books by Mary Renault? I've just started reading a book by this author - The Persian Boy, which was recommended by a work colleague who has kindly lent it to me

 

It traces the last seven years of Alexander the Great's life through the eyes of his Persian lover, the eunuch Bagoas - who is based on a real historical figure

 

It's such a pain having to work - if only I could retire and read all the books I need to read before I fall off the perch!

 

I read FIRE FROM HEAVEN, THE PERSIAN BOY, and THE KING MUST DIE by Renault. They were all good and I've listed them in order of my preference.

 

Also, anyone considering Steven Saylor might want to start with his first book ROMAN BLOOD. I love his writing and have read a about six of his novels. I've read Scarrow too, but I lean toward Saylor more.

 

For those who like the 5th century like me there's THE SWORD OF ATTILA by Michael Curtis Ford and THE SCOURGE OF GOD by William Dietrich.

 

Cinzia

 

Thanks for your recommendation - I'll look for those other books by Mary Renault

 

The Persian Boy is good - the writng is so evocative and there hasn't been a page of the book where I've felt like skimming over to the next page

 

We picked up a Steven Saylor book in an everything for $5 bookshop before Christmas but I haven't started it yet - Empire

 

I didnt enjoy Mary Renault's books but theSword of Attila looks likes interesting and so does Gods and Legions(Julian is one of my most favourite Romans.) and I must find out where my copy of The Eagle in the Snow is. It is time for a re-read.

 

 

Thank you for recommending Gods and Legions. Julian is one of my favourite Romans too. Have read the Last Pagan about him and also the Gore Vidal one called Julian. Both brilliant. So have added Gods and Legions to my wish list.

 

At present I am reading Imperium by Harris - about Cicero and am enjoying it. And have just finished Apuleius' Golden Ass which is just weird - but strangely enjoyable!

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Thank you for recommending Gods and Legions. Julian is one of my favourite Romans too. Have read the Last Pagan about him and also the Gore Vidal one called Julian. Both brilliant. So have added Gods and Legions to my wish list.

 

 

 

 

 

I too have read these books. The Vidal book years and years ago and no longer have a copy. It may be time to reread The Last Pagan. another book about Julian - Julian The Apostate by GW Bowersock, which is non - fiction.. I may have to reread that one too. For some reason I have no 'taste' in my mind about that book unlike the The Last Pagan.

 

I haven't read Gods and Legions yet, but it is on my wish list.

 

One of my all time favourite books on Rome - Bryan Ward-Perkins, The Fall of Roman and the End of Civilization.. a small but extremely well written and well researched book. An interesting book, of a past space of time that some consider a transition rather and an end.

Another favourite which not about the Empire but about the Republic - The Roman Republic by Michael Crawford. It was nice to see some of the ideas I thought about in print.

 

Right now I am slowly reading Civilization Before Greeece and Rome by HWF Saggs. Which seems to organized on themes in civilizations and with in the themes a chronoloigical discussion. Chapter 4 is Writing.

 

 

 

 

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Thank you for recommending Gods and Legions. Julian is one of my favourite Romans too. Have read the Last Pagan about him and also the Gore Vidal one called Julian. Both brilliant. So have added Gods and Legions to my wish list.

 

 

 

 

 

I too have read these books. The Vidal book years and years ago and no longer have a copy. It may be time to reread The Last Pagan. another book about Julian - Julian The Apostate by GW Bowersock, which is non - fiction.. I may have to reread that one too. For some reason I have no 'taste' in my mind about that book unlike the The Last Pagan.

 

I haven't read Gods and Legions yet, but it is on my wish list.

 

One of my all time favourite books on Rome - Bryan Ward-Perkins, The Fall of Roman and the End of Civilization.. a small but extremely well written and well researched book. An interesting book, of a past space of time that some consider a transition rather and an end.

Another favourite which not about the Empire but about the Republic - The Roman Republic by Michael Crawford. It was nice to see some of the ideas I thought about in print.

 

Right now I am slowly reading Civilization Before Greeece and Rome by HWF Saggs. Which seems to organized on themes in civilizations and with in the themes a chronoloigical discussion. Chapter 4 is Writing.

 

Has anyone read DEN of WOLVES by Luke Devenish? A friend sent me this one. The setting is 44 B.C. and surrounds a young Tiberius Nero and Livia Druscilla. It is narrated by an old slave. It's very well written, but it is also, in my opinion, VERY graphic. I'm no prude but some scenes and actions are really rough and cross into bestial realms and behaviors. I don't know enough about this era to know how historically accurate it is, but if you like uncensored debauchery (is that redundant?), you might like this! LOL

 

If anyone has read any of his books, I'd be interested in your opinion.

 

Cinzia

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