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Silentium

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Everything posted by Silentium

  1. Silentium

    North Africa and Latin

    I have found this fascinating post by Andrew Dalby on another thread which I am quoting, as I think it will be a great contribution for this thread: I was researching Berber to see if there was any trace of latin loanwords that could help reconstruct the nature of the Latin spoken in North Africa, and I
  2. Silentium

    Life after People

    The first one was broadcast again on RaiTre (Italian tv) only a few days ago. I'll watch the new series.
  3. Silentium

    An Ancient Roman Make-Up Lesson

    Brilliant =)
  4. Silentium

    Need translation help

    Sorry Viggen, I hadn't noticed this thread! Unfortunately Latin is very context-sensitive so I am not sure a word to word translation will do but here it is: The most complete SEO book ever! Completissimus SEO liber ex omnibus. 2nd revised Edition Editio secunda aucta et emendata esclusive at Hic solum [...] Here is the answer to all questions Hic omnibus questionibus responsa reperta sunt. (interrogationibus? again, context sensitive) You need more and/or better Links Oportet meliores iunctiones habere.
  5. That's what I was trying to say earlier but alas!My post was ignored I worked as a teaching assistant of Italian and Latin in a grammar school in Kent for some time. From what I've gathered only very few "upper class" schools have Latin (and Italian) in their curricula, i.e. the best grammar schools and the
  6. Silentium

    Roman Underworld

    Not really, the marble blocks and the bronze are still in good condition, they have guided tours of the meridiana (although, as I said before, you have to go through the basement of a house in Via di Campo Marzio). I was thinking about Roman era underground complexes (as the solarium very much used to be at the ground level) where most (or all) of the the probably few complexes are most likely to be heavily damaged or filled with mud and inaccessible. I'm having a very hard time imagining that anything like Casa dei Grifi would survive underground at the fields of Mars. Oh, sorry, I thought you were referring to the meridiana. Of course, the rest is either gone/deep in mud...everything was originally at ground level, as you pointed out earlier, and the site was soon earthed due to regular floodings from the Tiber. Well, at least Augustus' mausoleum is still standing and the Ara Pacis is safe inside a museum.
  7. Silentium

    Roman Underworld

    Not really, the marble blocks and the bronze are still in good condition, they have guided tours of the meridiana (although, as I said before, you have to go through the basement of a house in Via di Campo Marzio).
  8. Silentium

    Happy Birthday, Rome

    Would have been cool but I'm off to Naples for the week I'm not going either, flying back to England in a few days, but I attend the Natalis Romae every year (although each time they come up with something new). I recommend the members of UNRV and the visitors who are in Rome to go to the Circus Maximus for the celebrations, it is really worth it!
  9. It is in good grammar schools and in very posh schools.
  10. Silentium

    Roman Underworld

    I am not sure one can call it a "network" but there sure is something in Via di Campo Marzio. Deep underground in the area were the Campus Martius once was (7 metres underground), lies the so called Solarium sive Horologium Augusti. It was a huge solar clock (meridiana) which also consisted of an egyptian obelisc (it was built to commemorate the defeat of the egyptians). We know from Pliny that soon afterwards the meridiana stopped functioning properly (it no longer gave the exact time). At present you can get there passing through someone's basement... I've heard that it is under water nowadays, do you know if this is true? (Maybe this topic should be moved to another section at some point by the way?) Yes, about 10 centimetres under water.
  11. Silentium

    Happy Birthday, Rome

    Oh!Our eternal Rome, city of the seven hills! Here the roads lead, the rivers flow and here is the old Capitolium. Oh!Our Rome, once kept safe by geese, was made of marble bricks by Augustus Princeps. Love (your name spelt backwards) still lasts to this age. Let us cry out "Immortal Rome, we salute you" etc... NB:Roma spelt backwards is Amor, which means love in Latin. On the day of the Natalis Romae there will be celebrations at the Circus Maximus, with legions coming from all over Europe. You are all invited to the Circus Maximus (5.30 p.m.) to celebrate the founding of Rome .
  12. Silentium

    Roman Underworld

    I am not sure one can call it a "network" but there sure is something in Via di Campo Marzio. Deep underground in the area were the Campus Martius once was (7 metres underground), lies the so called Solarium sive Horologium Augusti. It was a huge solar clock (meridiana) which also consisted of an egyptian obelisc (it was built to commemorate the defeat of the egyptians). We know from Pliny that soon afterwards the meridiana stopped functioning properly (it no longer gave the exact time). At present you can get there passing through someone's basement... Picture here: You can find the obelisc in today's Piazza Montecitorio.
  13. Silentium

    Roman Underworld

    As a roman I think I can compile a list with the less known mithraea, tombs, necropolis, colombari, etc. The burial sites are usually concentrated in the Via Appia area, for obvious reasons. Mithraea: *Mithraeum Barberini - Via delle Quattro Fontane This is one of the few mithraea in Italy with wall paintings and frescos. It has all the fascination of the castra tenebrarum. *Mithraeum of the baths of Caracalla *Mithraeum of the Circus Maximus, Via dei Cerchi 6 There is another one under the Basilica of San Clemente, but I think it is one of the most famous and best-known in Rome. Tombs/Necropoleis/Mausolea: *Tombs of the Scipios, Via di San Sebastiano 9 *Tombs of the Via Latina, Via dell'Arco di Travertino 50 *Monte del Grano, Piazza dei Tribuni *Necropolis Ostiense, Via Ostiense *Generally, the Via Appia Antica (Mausolea of Priscilla, Caecilia Metella, Romolus) *Lucilius Petus' mausoleum, Via Salaria 125 bis Columbaria: *Pomponius Hylas, Via di Porta San Sebastiano 9 *Columbaria of Via Taranto, Via Pescara 2 *Columbaria of Vigna Codini, Via di Porta San Sebastiano 13 The Catacombs AD DECIMUM in Grottaferrata are probably the less known to tourists, being outside of the city. http://www.lecatacombe.it/lazio/territorio...rata/ad-decimum I could also list the Hypogea, Nymphaea and the various temples but I am not sure they would be relevant to the topic. If you can read Italian I suggest the book "Roma Sotterranea" by Ivana della Portella.
  14. Silentium

    Proto-Romance and Romance Languages

    The phenomenon you describe here (assimilation of the consonant nexus "nd" to "nn") is in no way an exclusive of Neapolitan. The same thing happens in the Roman dialect mondo>monno , Abruzzese mondo>munnu and in practically all of the dialects of central and southern Italy. If the assimilation of nd>nn was really due to the Oscan substratum then we would have to hypothesise that such substratum was extended to all of central and southern Italy, and I am not sure that is the case. I can't argue with you there. Italian or Italian dialects are not exactly my area of expertise - Portuguese is. So it's good of you to set things straight. Of course, I used "you" in an impersonal way but I should have said Wikipedia, really. My English is far from perfect as you can see . Welcome to UNRV, Aurelia, nice to have a Portuguese native speaker on the forum . By the way, for clarity's sake, my source for the previous post is: Bonomi, Elementi di Linguistica Italiana, 2003 pp. 25-26, it is an excellent introduction for those who want to deepen their knowledge of the Italian language and all of its varieties (geographical, social, historical, etc.).
  15. Silentium

    Proto-Romance and Romance Languages

    I agree, I remember Rohlfs' work dealt with the percentage of Greek lexicon in the language of these regions, usually higher than in the rest of the paeninsula, with the exception of southern Calabria, of which he says in a speech at Forte dei Marmi in 1964 (in Italian, sorry):
  16. Silentium

    Of my gods! I have to read this.

    LOL this is now on my priority list Main Characters: Jill Valentine Bennet, Chris Redfield Darcy
  17. Silentium

    Forma Urbis Romae

    I maybe wrong but I think it's located in Museum of Roman Civilization (Museo della Civilt Romana), located in the Roman suburb of EUR (Exposizione Universale di Roma). Which I believe is quite a long way from the city centre. What they keep at the Museo della Civilt
  18. Silentium

    Proto-Romance and Romance Languages

    The phenomenon you describe here (assimilation of the consonant nexus "nd" to "nn") is in no way an exclusive of Neapolitan. The same thing happens in the Roman dialect mondo>monno , Abruzzese mondo>munnu and in practically all of the dialects of central and southern Italy. If the assimilation of nd>nn was really due to the Oscan substratum then we would have to hypothesise that such substratum was extended to all of central and southern Italy, and I am not sure that is the case. Sorry Doc, I don't have one at the moment but will look for it.
  19. Silentium

    Picture of the day.

    Great pictures!How long will you be staying in Rome, Klingan? I don't know what the purpose of your visit is, but if you're interested I could post a list of archaeological sites in the Roman outskirts (including museums) some of them are really magnificent, yet sadly unknown to most visitors who come to Rome.
  20. Silentium

    Earthquake in L'Aquila, NE of Rome

    Thank you Nephele...I just wanted to say I am safe... the earthquake was very powerful here in my area, despite being miles away from the epicentre. I haven't been so scared in quite some time...at least I'm here to recount what happened, as we say in Italy. I'm very sorry for those who lost loved ones and are now homeless..
  21. Silentium

    North Africa and Latin

    Interesting. A similar phenomenon of substitution was occurring in the rest of the Rom
  22. Silentium

    Video clips in Latin via YouTube

    This is excellent! To an Italian speaker they sound like they have a slight accent, but it is an excellent production!
  23. http://www.beniculturali.it/luoghi/ricerca.asp?nd=lc,ri Here is a map of Italy with all the sites/museums available during the "settimana della cultura" (just click on the region or search the name of the museum/site you want to visit to see if it's included).
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