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Formosus Viriustus

Plebes
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About Formosus Viriustus

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  • Birthday 04/01/2008

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  1. Formosus Viriustus

    truly diabolical

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6QCzK0EVISo...feature=related michael jackson - black or white
  2. Can any parallels be drawn between the arrogant and condescending attitude of the present day Anglo-Saxons towards the rest of the world and the attitude of the Romans towards conquered peoples ? FV
  3. Formosus Viriustus

    "The Ancient Greeks and Global Warming"

    We might learn from the Ancient Greeks to stop smoking and we might learn to go on foot like them instead of driving around in cars killing pedestrians and cyclists by running them over and poisoning them with exhaust fumes. If all anti-tobacco fanatics would do away their cars instead of demonizing people who do no harm to anybody, they might really do something to safeguard other people's health and really do something to stop the complete destruction of the planet. I think we do not need any wise Greek statements for that. But maybe the Ancient Greeks have a wise statement on how to live ecologically in a world that has a population about 35 times that of their time ? And maybe they could teach us not to be Bigotz & Bitchez & Haterz all the time ? If it comes from a Greek instead of from a Jew, people here may take more notice ? FV
  4. Formosus Viriustus

    "The Ancient Greeks and Global Warming"

    Probably then more than now. FV
  5. Formosus Viriustus

    "The Ancient Greeks and Global Warming"

    Maybe the Ancient Greeks can also teach us a thing or two about the dangers of secondary smoking ? FV
  6. Formosus Viriustus

    Identification of a motif

    The Amazons also occurred to me as a possibility. But then the rider on the left seems to have a beard ? FV
  7. Formosus Viriustus

    The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross

    Thanks. Well, it's not a must maybe, Unless you're really into sex & drugs & history. And why buy a book if you can read it for free ? That's always been my philosophy. If the library hasn't got it, befriend an old hippy ; He's bound to have a copy. And he'll be glad to lend it to thee. F rmosus
  8. Formosus Viriustus

    Identification of a motif

    It's a warrior mounting a chariot. I agree. (Somewhere near Troy perhaps ? ) FV
  9. Formosus Viriustus

    Sinister Romans

    Thanks for the quote. I'm not sure if we can conclude much from it about left-handedness. I think that the fact that all legionaries had to fight right-handed is in little or no doubt anymore if ever it was. I find Livy's description also a bit counterintuitive : as a right-handed soldier in the middle of a battlefield, I would hold onto my sword at all costs ; use it to chop off heads and carry the heads with my left hand. It sounds to me more like a scene where the battle is already essentially won -- some enemy units still resisting or fighting a rearguard action -- and the victors failing to maximise their victory because of the trophy hunting and plundering. A rather common occurence, I think, at the time. In that case their might have been quite a few guys running around with both their hands holding heads. But Livy is right in concluding that such a method of awarding individual prizes may seriously hamper the efficiency of your soldiers at fighting as a unit, even in the heat of the battle.
  10. Formosus Viriustus

    Identification of a motif

    Looks like a shield to me. And they are carrying bows. On top, might that be the Horse of Troy with some warriors with shields around it ? FV
  11. Formosus Viriustus

    Identification of a motif

    They look like Scythians to me. FV
  12. Formosus Viriustus

    Codex Sinaiticus

    Codex Sinaiticus: text, Bible, book International conference, 6-7 July 2009 at the British Library Codex Sinaiticus Codex Sinaiticus is one of the most important books in the world. Handwritten well over 1600 years ago, the manuscript contains the Christian Bible in Greek, including the oldest complete copy of the New Testament. Its heavily corrected text is of outstanding importance for the history of the Bible and the manuscript
  13. Formosus Viriustus

    Pope claims human remains belong to St Paul

    Maybe it is King Tut's body in the St-Paul sarcophagus ? I wouldn't put that beyond the catholics. F rmosus
  14. Formosus Viriustus

    Wimbledon 2009

    BBC 1 - June 21th, 2010
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