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okay thanks a lot again guys. it was really helpful and got me interested in latin too. your advice and help will be really useful and appreciated thanks again.

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a request please- what would "bringer of wisdom from the sea " be translated as?

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Sapiens prudentiae ab mare. ( You can use de or ex instead of ab too. In a sense, all those means the same thing, well not really but in the sense.)

 

Sapiens means a wise(virtuous) man, sage philosopher.

You probably can use educator which means tutor; bringer up.

Also magister which means teacher.

The latin literally says A wise man of wisdom from the sea.

Well if you use sapiens, I doubt you need the word wisdom because the person himself is already wise.

Edited by FLavius Valerius Constantinus

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yet another request:-what do you think would be a reasonable Roman interpretation of a name meaning " son of the champion" or " son of the hero"?

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Filius viri ( or herois) or Filius campionis ( or promachi meanign champion)

 

Sorry, I have no expertise on this. In terms of "Son of a hero or god," they would think in terms that you were the son of a legendary general or god. Same as believing that Octavianus was great because his father Julius Caesar was a god. Anything having to do with glory would make people assume that person was great and so would his children be too.

 

Again, my expertise here sucks.

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Yes, you'll have to explain just what type of champion you're talking about. Hero, heros would be demigod (such as Hercules) victor as conquerer (like the champion of a battle)? A divine personage like Augustus would be divus.

 

Filius Herois

Filius Victoris

Filius Divi

 

Take you pick.

 

Constantine - ubi lexisti "promachus" et "campio" ut verba Latinae? Perhaps you're thinking of Medieval Latin words?

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Darn, I need to get a new dictionary. I have a vocabulary of mixed latin origins(including Church latin), so don't mind me. :P Sorry, I was using NeoLatin words, so its not classical then. But then again, promachus is of Greek origin which means one who leads.

Edited by FLavius Valerius Constantinus

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Guest Emyn

Hello, could someone please translate the phrases "The truth is out there" and "Trust no one" into Latin? If a direct translation does not work: "out there" in the first phrase implies that the truth does exist, and can be found or discovered. "Trust" is in the sense of one's confiding in, believing and relying upon a person, and "no one" simply means no person.

 

I think the first phrase should be something like "veritas est illic" and the second phrase something like "(confido/credo/fides) nemo" but I'm not sure if those are the most appropriate words. I know only a few Latin words and very little grammar, so any help is appreciated. I want to make sure these phrases are as close to 100% accurate as possible. Thanks!

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The truth is out there.--> Veritas foras est.

I wouldn't use illic since its points directly to one point instead of out there some where vaguely. I used foras( or peregri) because its an adverb meaning out of doors/ abroad.

 

Trust no one.---> Nulli crede.

Imperative, but the verb must be used with the dative and the word nemo is sorta irregular being that it has no plural and it has no gen or dative, so you have to use nullus,-a,-um.

 

I'm not so sure about the first one, I may be totally wrong with the choice of words.

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Guest residentgearhead

hi,

a friend wants to get "control is an illusion" translated into latin for a tattoo shes getting. she had an online translator come out with "imperium est figmentum".

i'm not too good with latin, but the -UM endings seem too simple, as though they havent been conjugated. that and any automated translator is kinda scary.

anyone confident enough to translate for a tatoo?

thanks in advance

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Imperium praestigia est.

Figmentum is a word that means fiction, so I suppose you can use it. I'm not so sure myself if the meaning of praestigia is truly classical meaning illusion/deception. Everything is in the nominative since you're stating that power/authority and illusion are the same thing.Another word for power is auctoritas, mainly meaning authority.

By the way, don't trust my advice, nor bother tell you're friend yet, my expertise is often wrong.

 

I'm going to have to wait for you, Scerio, to correct me. ;)

Edited by FLavius Valerius Constantinus

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Can you translate this song? I don't quite know how to spell it so I'll guess at it then do it phonetically. We sing it in chorus and I want to know what it is.

 

Uve latte deo

 

you-vee-la-tae-day-oh

 

(and yes, that's pretty much all there is to the song lol but its pretty when sung as a group with different "levels")

 

I think you mean Jubilate Deo? "Shout with joy to God."

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Can you translate this song? I don't quite know how to spell it so I'll guess at it then do it phonetically. We sing it in chorus and I want to know what it is.

 

Uve latte deo

 

you-vee-la-tae-day-oh

 

(and yes, that's pretty much all there is to the song lol but its pretty when sung as a group with different "levels")

 

I think you mean Jubilate Deo? "Shout with joy to God."

 

You're right. Its the mistake of hearing the wrong pronunciation. It even ponders me more how people listen to opera.

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Hello, could someone please translate the phrases "The truth is out there" and "Trust no one" into Latin? If a direct translation does not work: "out there" in the first phrase implies that the truth does exist, and can be found or discovered. "Trust" is in the sense of one's confiding in, believing and relying upon a person, and "no one" simply means no person.

 

I think the first phrase should be something like "veritas est illic" and the second phrase something like "(confido/credo/fides) nemo" but I'm not sure if those are the most appropriate words. I know only a few Latin words and very little grammar, so any help is appreciated. I want to make sure these phrases are as close to 100% accurate as possible. Thanks!

Illic would work, or procul. Est is not needed necessarily.

 

Credi nemini (or neminem, although the first is preferred) for trust no one.

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